FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Engineering Infinity has been added to your Cart
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ships from the USA. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. Book shows a small amount of wear - very good condition. Selection as wide as the Mississippi.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Engineering Infinity Mass Market Paperback – Dec 28 2010

3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 9.89
CDN$ 2.75 CDN$ 0.01

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
click to open popover


Frequently Bought Together

  • Engineering Infinity
  • +
  • Edge of Infinity
  • +
  • Reach for Infinity
Total price: CDN$ 32.37
Buy the selected items together

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Solaris (Dec 28 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1907519521
  • ISBN-13: 978-1907519529
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.8 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #310,640 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

About the Author

Johnathan Strahan is an editor and anthologist. He co-edited The Year's Best Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy anthology series in 1997 and 1998. He is also the reviews editor of Locus. He lives in Perth, Western Australia with his wife and their two daughters.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
As I have stated more than once in previous reviews, I am a great fan of short stories and they are one of the best means to experience unfamiliar authors. This anthology has a nice mix of the familiar & unfamiliar and most of the stories fit pretty well within my preferred sub-genre of `hard sf' although, as the foreword admits, I would definitely categorise a couple of them as fantasy. Not that this matters; I thoroughly enjoyed reading them all and I will definitely expand my scope of authors as a consequence.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
By John M. Ford TOP 100 REVIEWER on Feb. 22 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This is an odd little collection of fifteen science fiction stories. For one thing, the table of contents is on the last page. I have no idea why. I also can't see what the theme of the collection might be. The editor, Jonathan Strahan, outlines the history of science fiction from Hugo Gernsback to the present. The field has matured beyond the restrictions of early hard science fiction and become something wider, richer, and apparently harder to define.

What about the stories? "[S]ome of the stories are classic hard SF, some are not. [I]t is part of the ongoing discussion about what science fiction is in the 21st century." Since the stories are not related in any systematic way, perhaps the collection is a celebration of diversity. I am never sure what people mean by that, either. Ah, well. The stories are all pretty good, each in its own way. Four stood out for me:

Hannu Rajaniemi's "The Server and the Dragon" has no human characters. But it is rich with motives and emotions that humans have no trouble understanding. From two, one.

Robert Reed's "Mantis" is two stories, edited. A man and a woman exercise and watch another man and woman meet on the street outside. Between the two couples a high tech window subtly alters what they see of each other. Oh, and there's a bug.

In Gwyneth Jones' "The Ki-anna" a fraternal twin investigates his sister's death on a war-torn planet. An accident or a murder or the self-sacrifice of a seasoned anthropologist?
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A very good collection of short stories.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa5222b10) out of 5 stars 21 reviews
30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa522f798) out of 5 stars Gernsback to the Future April 18 2011
By John M. Ford - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is an odd little collection of fifteen science fiction stories. For one thing, the table of contents is on the last page. I have no idea why. I also can't see what the theme of the collection might be. The editor, Jonathan Strahan, outlines the history of science fiction from Hugo Gernsback to the present. The field has matured beyond the restrictions of early hard science fiction and become something wider, richer, and apparently harder to define.

What about the stories? "[S]ome of the stories are classic hard SF, some are not. [I]t is part of the ongoing discussion about what science fiction is in the 21st century." Since the stories are not related in any systematic way, perhaps the collection is a celebration of diversity. I am never sure what people mean by that, either. Ah, well. The stories are all pretty good, each in its own way. Four stood out for me:

Hannu Rajaniemi's "The Server and the Dragon" has no human characters. But it is rich with motives and emotions that humans have no trouble understanding. From two, one.

Robert Reed's "Mantis" is two stories, edited. A man and a woman exercise and watch another man and woman meet on the street outside. Between the two couples a high tech window subtly alters what they see of each other. Oh, and there's a bug.

In Gwyneth Jones' "The Ki-anna" a fraternal twin investigates his sister's death on a war-torn planet. An accident or a murder or the self-sacrifice of a seasoned anthropologist?

In John Barnes' "The Birds and the Bees and the Gasoline Trees" the growth of a huge undersea structure is investigated by a nearly-indestructible genetically engineered woman who has been recalled to Earth from the environment she was designed for. She works with her ex-husband and his new wife.

I recommend the collection for its interesting and dissimilar stories. Don't invest a lot of time trying to figure out how the stories are related or what this means for the future of science fiction. Just read and enjoy.
26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa522f9e4) out of 5 stars Decent Stories, but False Premises Oct. 9 2012
By Julia M Nolan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
So, I purchased "Engineering Infinity" with the idea that, hey, I like short stories! I like hard science fiction! I want to read a collection of hard science fiction stories!

The thing is, most of the short stories are okay. Some I liked, some I disliked. Same as most short story collections. (Although there were no standouts in this one for me, but that may be personal taste. At the very least, none of the short stories were ghastly.)

But...out of the 15 stories in the book, only one could be classified as hard science fiction. The rest were sociological science fiction or fantasy with "nanotech" or some other buzzword added in to make them sound like science fiction. (Like the story about angels. Like, I'm cool with angels. The story was fine. But...it's not hard science fiction by any stretch of the imagination, unless we're going to use new definitions and classify Tolkien as "hard science fiction" since, hey, why not?)

I'd be fine with the premise if the anthology was sold as "vaguely science fiction-y concepts". But when it's explicitly supposed to be hard science fiction, and yet <10% of the stories are hard science fiction (and the copy on the cover doesn't seem to describe any of the short stories found within), I'm left wanting my money back. Like...I paid for hard science fiction. I want hard science fiction. This collection is *not* hard science fiction.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa522fc24) out of 5 stars Frustrating Sept. 10 2011
By T. Sherman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Overall, this collection was disappointing. There are a few real clunkers, and many stories just don't live up to the ideas behind them; or at least deserved better endings. A few stood out as pretty good. None of them blew my mind, that's for sure.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa522fdc8) out of 5 stars Good collection, but some are not very extreme. Feb. 10 2013
By kcd - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Some of these stories were only barely scifi, and it took an active imagination and stretched interpretation of the stories to actually understand what would make them extreme--as in, I could see numerous readers interpreting a handful stories as mere journal entries of random events in the characters' lives with mundane events that barely mean anything. Only if you interpret them at their most stretched interpretations are they "extreme". Otherwise, they're only about as extreme as a Chevy S-10 "Xtreme Edition" is for a normal Chevy S-10 pickup truck. If that's your idea of "extreme" then you'll LOVE these stories. Otherwise, I recommend the Mammoth Book of Extreme Science Fiction--which by far may be one of the greatest extreme scifi anthologies I've read.
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa522fc9c) out of 5 stars Decent, but not fantastic. June 10 2011
By Erik Williams - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this because the title sounded super interesting; the collection, however, disappointed on that front. Most of the stories were forgettable and almost none of them had me thinking for more than a minute or two. Don't get me wrong - it's a good read if you're looking for something just to 'read'. But, if you're looking for something really thought-provoking, you ought to look elsewhere.


Feedback