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The Exile Hardcover – Aug 12 2004

4.2 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 704 pages
  • Publisher: Forge Books (Aug. 17 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765309467
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765309464
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 4.7 x 24.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,893,253 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From Booklist

Folsom, the author of the thrilling Day after Tomorrow (1994), which has no connection to the recent movie, and the decidedly less thrilling Day of Confession (1998), returns mostly to form in this fast-paced, exciting adventure. John Barron, a young LAPD detective, assists in the capture of a vicious killer, who dies during surgery following a gunfight. But some of his fellow cops are also killed in the process, and Barron is forced to leave the department, and the country, to avoid retribution from his former colleagues and friends. He assumes a new identity, moves to Europe, meets a nice lady--and then is confronted with the terrifying prospect that the villain who supposedly died in L.A. is not dead after all and is moving forward with his original plan. Written in short chapters, with a sturdy hero and a despicably clever villain, the novel grabs readers from the opening scenes and rarely lets them loose. Although it seems as though the author has written the book with an eye toward a future movie adaptation--short chapters, plenty of physical action, a constant reminder of the date and time, some scenes even written from an audience's point of view ("The viewer realized that somewhere out there was Raymond")--it isn't an outline posing as a novel. Sure, it's slick and a bit superficial, but it does what it sets out to do: deliver breathless excitement. David Pitt
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

"A heart-thumping, stay-up-late novel . . . Wild, unputdownable . . . Brilliant."
---Los Angeles Times Book Review on The Day AfterTomorrow

"Once you start The Exile, forget sleep. Its fierce, complex suspense is fast as a 9mm slug and tight as a hangman's noose."
---Stephen Coonts

"More twists and turns than a strand of DNA."---William Peter Blatty, bestselling author of The Exorcist, on The Exile

"Hold on tight---from the first scene Folsom spins a tale of page-turning suspense."
---W. E. B. Griffin on The Exile

"You only have to read the explosive opening to know you're in the hands of a natural storyteller."---Andrew Klavan on The Exile

"A chilling jigsaw puzzle . . . This thriller doesn't leap out of the starting gate---it's catapulted."---Cleveland Plain Dealer on The Day After Tomorrow

"Folsom is an enthusiastic storyteller with a talent for vivid characterization on a big canvas."
---Chicago Tribune on Day of Confession





"Once you start The Exile, forget sleep. Its fierce, complex suspense is fast as a 9mm slug and tight as a hangman's noose." (Stephen Coonts)

"Hold on tight---from the first scene Folsom spins a tale of page-turning suspense." (W.E.B. Griffin)

"More twists and turns than a strand of DNA." (William Peter Blatty Bestselling author of The Exorcist)

"You only have to read the explosive opening to know you're in the hands of a natural storyteller." (Andrew Klavan Two-time Edgar Award winning author of True Crime and Don't Say a Word)

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
This appears to be some kind of research project. How many rhetorical questions can you pose before the reader nods off? The characters--all of whom are stereotyped and unengaging--ask those questions endlessly, in a futile attempt to appear portentous or intelligent or something, and eventually it all founders in one big yawn.
It's not so much the fact that the only thing pacy is the rate at which the cliches fly at you. It's not even the ludicrous improbability of events--and yes, this is fiction, but some internal logic would be nice. And it isn't the lousy research either--if one uses Russian names one should at least familiarize oneself with the rules that govern the patronymic (ditto for the correct address of various types of British nobility); and no, 'Enkratzer' does not mean 'skyscraper' in Swiss German or any other known language.
It's the obvious indifference of both author and editor that makes this book so annoying. Hey, the reader's studpid; he/she/it won't notice. Well, most of them probably do.
The really sad thing is, if this were the manuscript of an aspiring author, the guy would be laughed at instead of published.
Save your money!
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Format: Paperback
Maureen, the emotionally battered Glaswegian introduced in Garnethill, finds herself caught in a trap of depression and dispair, separated from nearly every important relationship in her life. One of the most important relationships she feels she losing is with her friend Lesley. So when Lesley asks her help in finding out what happened to a client of the shelter for abused women she agrees for the sake of Lesley and the client's husband, who appears to be a most unlikely batterer.
Many of the characters from Garnethill reappear including the sympathetic and unsympathetic officers of the law, Maureen's protective brother Liam, and Lynn his first girlfriend. New characters are introduced, notably Kilty Goldfarb, a disenchanted social worker and Vik, Maureen's new love interest.
The plot twists and turns between London and Glasgow, as Maureen tries to puzzle out exactly what happened to Ann Harris and why. Don't start this one late in the evening, it might keep you up most of the night!
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Format: Hardcover
The second in Glasgow author Denise Mina's projected trilogy ("Garnethill" won the John Creasey Award), "Exile" again features the driven, hard-drinking, damaged Maureen O'Donnell and the grimmer, grimier precincts of Glasgow.
The story concerns the murder of Ann Harris, a battered alcoholic who briefly resided at the women's shelter where Maureen reluctantly works. Agreeing to help her best friend, Maureen looks in on Harris' harassed husband, one of life's ..., who is, however, touchingly devoted to his four "weans." When Harris' body turns up in London, Jimmy goes to the top of the suspects list.
Partly to escape her own haunting problems - her sexually abusive father has returned to Glasgow and his proximity fills her with dread - Maureen goes to London when Ann's body surfaces there. She traces Ann's movements among the drug and alcohol addicted, and the violent traffickers in human weakness. The suspense builds as Maureen slowly gathers the pieces of Ann's messy life, crossing paths and swords with prey and predator.
The story is absorbing, gritty and well organized, the pace wonderfully irregular. But the heart of this novel is Mina's writing, her visceral evocations of people and place. Maureen is a complex knot of longings, intellect, fearlessness and terror. Nothing is simple.
Maureen's reaction to clueless, ... Jimmy: "He tried to smile at her, sliding his lips back, but his face was too tired to pull it off. He had threateningly sharp teeth, which slanted backwards into his mouth. They looked like a vicious little carnivore's, naturally selected because they slid deeper into the flesh when the victim resisted."
And this is the man she decides to champion. Maureen is no trusting soul. But she does yearn.
Read more ›
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Format: Hardcover
Denise Mina has embarked upon a series, featuring her most unlikely heroine, sexually abused and haunted by the experience, Maureen O'Donnell. Mina gets high marks for her depiction of a young woman battling her mental store of horrors; angry, confrontational and daring, Maureen hurls herself into everything: love, family relationships, encounters with strangers, even danger. Her recklessness is emblematic of those troubled by and driven by abusive pasts. And Mina is right on the money when it comes to detailing her endless doubts--about her friendships, her family, herself--and her forays into situations anyone less driven wouldn't approach for any amount of love or money.
Embarking with her best friend, Leslie (who is a rough-hewn gem in her own right, just as Maureen is in hers) on tracking down the missing battered-wife Ann Harris, the embattled friends travel over exceedingly rocky terrain. Some of Maureen's actions might defy credibility were it not for the solidly established foundation of her angry determination to right injustices and unfairness where she finds them.
When the search evolves into investigating the murder of Ann Harris, Maureen puts herself in the way of danger with fear that comes as an afterthought. This young woman is a fascinating study of contradictions: she is bold and brash, good-hearted, humorous and unstoppable. And in spite of the enormous potential for personal harm, Maureen prevails and unearths the truth.
Mina has great skill at characterization; it is her primary asset, along with her ability to give the reader a powerful sense of Glasgow--its often mean streets, its weather, its population, its often unexpected gallows humor.
This is a fine book, on the way to becoming a fine series. It's anything but light reading, but completely compelling.
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