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Fahrenheit 451 School & Library Binding – Aug 12 1987

4.1 out of 5 stars 1,014 customer reviews

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School & Library Binding, Aug 12 1987
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Product Details

  • School & Library Binding: 179 pages
  • Publisher: Turtleback Books (Aug. 12 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0881030198
  • ISBN-13: 978-0881030198
  • Product Dimensions: 17.9 x 11.3 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 1,014 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #628,624 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

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In Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury's classic, frightening vision of the future, firemen don't put out fires--they start them in order to burn books. Bradbury's vividly painted society holds up the appearance of happiness as the highest goal--a place where trivial information is good, and knowledge and ideas are bad. Fire Captain Beatty explains it this way, "Give the people contests they win by remembering the words to more popular songs.... Don't give them slippery stuff like philosophy or sociology to tie things up with. That way lies melancholy."

Guy Montag is a book-burning fireman undergoing a crisis of faith. His wife spends all day with her television "family," imploring Montag to work harder so that they can afford a fourth TV wall. Their dull, empty life sharply contrasts with that of his next-door neighbor Clarisse, a young girl thrilled by the ideas in books, and more interested in what she can see in the world around her than in the mindless chatter of the tube. When Clarisse disappears mysteriously, Montag is moved to make some changes, and starts hiding books in his home. Eventually, his wife turns him in, and he must answer the call to burn his secret cache of books. After fleeing to avoid arrest, Montag winds up joining an outlaw band of scholars who keep the contents of books in their heads, waiting for the time society will once again need the wisdom of literature.

Bradbury--the author of more than 500 short stories, novels, plays, and poems, including The Martian Chronicles and The Illustrated Man--is the winner of many awards, including the Grand Master Award from the Science Fiction Writers of America. Readers ages 13 to 93 will be swept up in the harrowing suspense of Fahrenheit 451, and no doubt will join the hordes of Bradbury fans worldwide. --Neil Roseman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"One of this country's most beloved writers . . . A great storyteller, sometimes even a mythmaker, a true American classic." --Michael Dirda, "The Washington Post"

"The sheer lift and power of a truly original imagination exhilarates . . . His is a very great and unusual talent." --Christopher Isherwood, "Tomorrow"

"Brilliant . . . Startling and ingenious . . . Mr. Bradbury's account of this insane world, which bears many alarming resemblances to our own, is fascinating." --Orville Prescott, "The New York Times"

"A masterpiece . . . A glorious American classic everyone should read: It's life-changing if you read it as a teen, and still stunning when you reread it as an adult." --Alice Hoffman, "The Boston Globe"

"Frightening in its implications . . . Mr. Bradbury's account of this insane world, which bears many alarming resemblances to our own, is fascinating." --"The New York Times" --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I've read F-451 a dozen times and it never gets old for me. Bradbury is at his best here with his passionate language and superb characterization, and creative storyline. This year, because I was swamped with other reading, I decided to try the audio. Awesome. This book reads well in audio (some don't), and Tim Robbins does a terrific job narrating it. I recommend it hightly
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When I got this book, I didn't know what I was getting myself into. I knew the book was about a guy who worked as a "fireman" but that was about it. When I finally started reading the book, it far exceeded my expectations. It got me thinking about a lot of things in our society today that sort of mirror things happening in the book. It also got me thinking about I can do to prevent things like in the book from happening (SPOILER:unlike a character in the book). I enjoyed this book and I would recommend it to anyone who has read other distopian novels.
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Format: Paperback
Stop Thinking.

Stop Thinking Right Now.

Because that book you have in your hands will cause you to Think.

Unacceptable Behavior.

Prepare for the book to burn.

Thank You for your cooperation.

This is the future world existing just around the corner, only a scant few minutes from our present times. Everyday, books which are filled with ideas to provoke thoughts and feelings in us, are routinely challenged and banned by unthinking and unfeeling scoundrels. These immoral vapid inhabitants of our planet are constantly trying to control what you read in order to control how you think. The scary insane world they propagate is shown in all of it’s terrifying fullness in one book. A literary classic by one of our modern masters.

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. And yes, “they” have attempted to ban this book as well.

A Spoiler Filled Summary Follows.

First published in 1953, this slim volume tells the complete tale of Earth, sometime down our future road, where books of all types are banned. Reading is prohibited by law. Virtually everyone drugs themselves out on television all night and day. Into this time and place we are introduced to Montag, who, while out walking one night, meets a teenage girl named Clarisse. She does the unthinkable and goads him into thinking, creating thoughts of his own, and wonder about all aspects of his life. Montag’s wife is whiling her life away in front of the television, and he cannot seek solace for these uncomfortable ideas at work either. For Montag has the profession of enforcer of this societies rules. He is a fireman.

For in this twisted tormented existence, all houses are fireproof.
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Format: Paperback
This compact little story still packs a punch, although parts of it seem less prescient than others. In this futuristic tale, Bradbury imagines a world where books are illegal and firemen are hired to burn book stashes wherever they are found. Bradbury's protagonist, the fireman Montag, is jolted by a series of encounters and events into rebelling against his vocation and secretly hiding books himself. This leads to a clash with the authorities and the need for Montag to go on the run.

The contempt for the written word certainly seems to fit our times as well as the times of Bradbury, however the distinct roles played by the different sexes comes across as quaint in our world. As well, our time seems more indifferent to the words of the past than hostile, more Brave New World than Fahrenheit 451. Nevertheless this tale engagingly provokes thought about the value of the written word, and how easily it can be lost
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What a talented writer. The book is short and to the point without lacking any of the details necessary for a good story. This writer is brilliant and clearly put a lot of thought into this book. It's written in such a way that it can be read by any reader at any level.
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Format: Paperback
I do not want to tell much of the story, as the unfolding is part of the intrigue. However now that houses are fire proof the purpose of firemen is performing a service by burning books to maintain the happy social order.

Naturally one fireman goes awry after several emotional incidences from someone burning up with the books to a young neighbor with strange ways, which run counter to his carrier. This leads to all kinds of deviant things like reading. What are you doing now?

One big rift between the book and the movie [Fahrenheit 451 (1966) -- Oscar Werner, Julie Christie] is that in the movie the "written word" was completely removed (even from the credits); where as in the book the state was against was literature and not technical writing.

Books are just symbols of ideas that could have been on the screen also. There is deference between training and education. Among other reasons the book was a symbol of one mans superiority over another in a world of equals.

Fahrenheit 451

Zen in the Art of Writing: Essays on Creativity by Ray Bradbury
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Format: School & Library Binding
One big rift between the book and the movie [Fahrenheit 451 (1966) -- Oskar Werner, Julie Christie] is that in the movie the "written word" was completely removed (even from the credits); where as in the book the state was against literature and not technical writing. Books are just symbols of ideas that could have been on the screen also. There is a difference between training and education. Among other reasons the book was a symbol of one mans superiority over another in a world of equals.

I do not want to tell much of the story, as the unfolding is part of the intrigue. However now that houses are fire proof the purpose of firemen is performing a service by burning books to maintain the happy social order.

Naturally one fireman goes awry after several emotional incidences that run counter to his carrier. This leads to all kinds of deviant things like reading. What are you doing now?
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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