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Faith Original recording remastered

4.5 out of 5 stars 51 customer reviews

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Frequently Bought Together

  • Faith
  • +
  • Seventeen Seconds
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  • Pornography
Total price: CDN$ 39.48
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 28 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Rhino-Atlantic
  • ASIN: B000ENC73Q
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 51 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #74,479 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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1. Holy Hour
2. Primary
3. Other Voices
4. All Cats Are Grey
5. Funeral Party
6. Doubt
7. Drowning Man
8. Faith

Product Description

Originally a goth-flavored post-punk outfit, The Cure evolved into one of the truly seminal bands of the '80s, and ultimately one of modern rock's most celebrated and influential acts. Guided by creative visionary Robert Smith, The Cure's signature sound balances dreamy pop savvy and poetic lyricism with a dark, brooding intensity. The band's first four groundbreaking albums-newly remastered-are a series of masterpieces that laid the groundwork for their phenomenal and enduring popularity. Fusing superbly crafted songs with charged emotional depth from the very beginning, The Cure's early catalogue, as upgraded by Rhino, is ready to be revisted. Elektra. 2006.


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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
You know what, it's not a bad album at all and "The Drowning Man" is amazing, but, if I were you and if you're a fan, which would in turn make you like me, I'd wait for the digital remaster due out in a few months. Robert Smith, the singer, always said the record company messed up the original mastering of this album on CD to the point he feels the cassette tape sounds better; he hopes to correct that by supervising the remaster. It'll also contain an extra disc of bonus sides.
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Format: Audio CD
Part II of the unofficial trilogy that begun with 17 seconds and ends with pornography.When listened to in order, you hear the deconstruction of the cure's sound and move towards a sparse landscape throughout 17 seconds, and faith moves to a fuller tone that is at times etheral.The cover's dreary, undefined hue is congruent to the emotion expressed on most of the eight trks. This journey climaxes with th rage,regret,and resentful despair spilled out on pornography.The first trk.(the holy hour)opens with the faraway rings of cathedral bells,somber bass strumming, and a voice on the edge of tears.Primary,1 of 2 up-tempo trks, finds smith spewing vocals cloaked in insoucinace, and a sing-song chorus evoking images of children at recess. Other voice's marching drums,and echo tinged vocals have the feel of a vague dream,and features the lyric that simply conveys a sense of alienation;"I live with desertion...and 8 million people".All cats are grey is the perfect soft lull to precede the funeral party,which marries mournful vocals to morbidly serene music. The 6th trk.(doubt) is the 2nd up-tempo # which has the vocal pacings of earlier songs like so what,and grinding halt.The drowning man has smith's vocals submerge and surface steadily in the tide of music as faint rhytmic claps splash throughout the background.The title trk. has a long intro which effectively establishes the mood needed to accomodate smith's pensive vocals."There's nothing left but faith",is repeated several times,making it sound less like a stated fact,but as if everything tangible is gone,and he must convince himself that he has at least something to cling to. Faith is a good album,but is better when heard in the context of a triumvirate,nestled between 17 seconds and pornography.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
"Faith" is an album laden with misery, desperation, loss, and brief flashes of hope quickly extinguished. The best time to listen to this album is on rainy afternoons.
A couple of the songs on "Faith" were influenced by Mervyn Peake's gothic fantasy "The Gormenghast Trilogy". These are "All Cats Are Grey" and "The Drowning Man." Gormenghast is a castle that is 77 generations old. Grey and cobwebbed, crumbling and rotten, choked with weeds of tradition and ritual. A place where nothing changes. The tradition everyone goes through is repetitive drudgery. That is the issue Robert Smith was tackling with this album. Smith was interested in people's blind acceptance and unquestioning faith - faith in something that doesn't always make sense, but gives life a sense of purpose. In our world we call this religion.
The songs I like best on the album are "Primary" and "The Funeral Party". The latter has the hypnotic quality of the "Twin Peaks" theme music, but sadder. (That's my impression anyway.)
It's no secret that The Cure's trademark was depression and gloom. Even the Wedding Singer admitted he was influenced by this band when he wrote his ballard "Somebody Kill Me." "Faith", and to a greater extent, "Pornography", would have been the key influences.
If you're a fan of early eighties music, you have to have "Faith" in your collection.
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Format: Audio CD
I have every Cure album. I love this album, and "Pornography", because they are (to me) The Cure's two "trance" albums (for want of better words), they distort the room's ambience and twist your head. Both Faith and Pornography are best appreciated by lying down on the floor with your eyes closed and head between the stereo's speakers. Just lie still and let Faith's reverbing emptiness slowly descend and wash over you and it will put you into it's trance. You'll progress effortlessly through these moody tracks, rolling along with the momentum of "Primary", soaking up Smith's disturbed ambience in "The Holy Hour"... and by the time you get through "All Cat's Are Grey" and "The Funeral Party" it will have meditated within you a listless futile vulnerable feeling. There's a manically hostile detour with "Doubt", and then slowly the mood decends more and more into a cerebral despair - the utter melancholy of "The Drowning Man", symbolic of the whole Faith experience, spartan disjointed and spooky riffs which accompany Robert Smith's desperate "drowning" voice, blurring into the final track "Faith" where he finally declares his absolute despair. Remember this is 1981, the height of New Wave synthesizer pop - The Cure managed to perfect a balance with the new electronic sounds, not abusing it, just skilfully crafting this trademark sombre mood. There's lots of stand outs (tracks like "Other Voices", "Doubt", "Primary", etc) but I prefer to take this album as one continuous 'thing', from start to finish, the sum being more powerful for me than the parts. A masterpiece of "mood engineering".
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