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Final Cut (W/1 Bonus Track) Original recording remastered

3.8 out of 5 stars 113 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 4 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: EMI Music Canada
  • ASIN: B0001KZM3O
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 113 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #37,701 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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1. The Post War Dream
2. Your Possible Pasts
3. One Of The Few
4. When The Tigers Broke Free
5. The Hero's Return
6. The Gunners Dream
7. Paranoid Eyes
8. Get Your Filthy Hands Off My Desert
9. The Fletcher Memorial Home
10. Southampton Dock
11. The Final Cut
12. Not Now John
13. Two Suns In The Sunset

Product Description

Product Description

Pink Floyd 2011 Remasters

Amazon.ca

The last release from the Roger Waters-led incarnation of the band, The Final Cut is easily the most darkly provocative entry in the entire Pink Floyd catalog. Many fans and critics tend to think of it as a Roger Waters solo album, though it certainly hangs together much better than The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking or Radio K.A.O.S.. Others view it as a sequel to The Wall--and indeed, The Final Cut tackles many of the same issues (the futility of war, the innate powerlessness of the individual in modern society), albeit with twice the bile and intensity. The anger that fires songs like "The Hero's Return" and "Not Now John" is certainly legitimate, and Michael Kamen's orchestral arrangements are absolutely stunning, but the entire listening experience can be pretty draining. On the other hand, if you found The Wall to be too soft or commercial, The Final Cut is definitely the record for you. --Dan Epstein --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
This just isnt a very good album, in the year 2014 it seems very dated, like an old simpsons episode, yes some of the lyrics are good but in most cases they are not, and yes there are a few flashes of good music but for the most part not and it does have some pretty neat ambient sounds and sonic special effects, but not enough to get it over 2 stars.

This might be worth l;istening to once every 5 years or so when in an introspective mood, or you are thinking about how the powers that be are turning england/UK into an islamic state complete with zones where only muslims are allowed to go, you know the failure of the postwar dream, but apart from that, forget about it

this album could kill a party faster than accordian music
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Format: Audio CD
Pink Floyd's The Final Cut was originally released in April of 1983. The album was the first Pink Floyd album of new material since 1979's 23 million plus seller The Wall. The album was mainly the work of Roger Waters(bass player/vocals) with muted contribution from drummer Nick Mason and guitarist/vocalist David Gilmour. Keyboardist Rick Wright was kicked out the band during The Wall sessions by Waters. The Final Cut was supposed to be the soundtrack to The Wall movie but instead became a gloomy vivid portrait of a morally crumbling post-WWII/Falklands War era England. The album is fixated on the second World War and what the personal and societal sacrifices of that conflict meant to Great Britain in 1982/1983. "What have we done to England?/Should we shout, should we scream/'What happened to the post war dream?'" lyricist Roger Waters asks on the opening The Post War Dream. Throughout the album, Roger(whom had lost his father in World War II) explores that inquiry. Your Possible Pasts are taking shots at then UK and US leaders Thatcher and the late Ronald Reagan, which dates this song slightly. The main character in this album is the teacher from The Wall whom was disappointed in the generation they preserved (One of the Few and The Hero's Return), trying to keep a fellow serviceman's dream alive(The Gunner's Dream which is one of the album's best tracks), pursued by ghosts (Paranoid Eyes). Get Your Filthy Hands Off My Desert is great and is followed by my favorite song on the album The Fletcher Memorial Home which depicted Thatcher and Reagan as overgrown infants and tyrants(though I did like Reagan but c'est la vie). Southampton Dock was about Thatcher waving goodbye to the men and not about wives waving their husbands goodbye to go to war. The title cut is a great song too.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
So this isn't Floyd's best, and isn't experimental. The songs bare no resistance to dark side of the moon. It seems, to me, like Roger was a little influenced by Lennon's death three years earlier. The resemblence is striking on tracks like the gunner's dream (listen to imagine), and like John's music, this is strikingly honest, political and personal. Weither or not John's death contributed to these things is your own call, I think it did, in part.
This stands as one of the harshest political statements in ages, in fact it reminds me of how Dante used the inferno to condemn political figures to hell. The statement in Fletcher Memorial is similiarly strong, exposing leaders as being "overgrown infants."
The song "Two Suns in the Sunset" almost brings me to tears when I hear, "and you'll never hear their voices" "Daddy! Daddy!". So powerful.
I simply love the sick sarcastic setting for "get your filthy hands off my desert." It illustrates the level in which those in power are detached from those without. The totally ironic strings come in with lame pompus music, its almost comical.
Possible Pasts show cases the way in which what could have been haunts us. In fact, like butterflies, they play around just out of reach.
In the song "not now John" I am trying to figure out if John is lennon. Although the first time i heard it i dennounce the possiblity, I am now not sure. It talks about how we are putting art, the environment, and indeed our own education behind the needs of the state to be powerful. Either it is that John Lennon is being used as a symbol for artists and works of Art, or John means a common person, like Joe and they are telling John not to indulge in art. If anybody knows, they arent' telling me.
All in all a very theatrical release and I love it.
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Format: Audio CD
Pink Floyd's last studio album to feature Roger Waters is getting a full audio polish and having the track, 'When the Tigers Broke Free, mixed into it's running order. WTTBF was originally written by Roger Waters for the Pink Floyd film 'The Wall and has only ever appeared on the album 'Echoes - The Best of Pink Floyd. A 7" vinyl release did appear in 1982, and curiously has a sticker on the front that read, "from the forth coming Pink Floyd album - The Final Cut." At the time the next Pink Floyd album was going to be a medley of songs from the film, first titled 'Spare Bricks then 'The Final Cut. As Roger watched the Falklands War unfold, he felt moved to write an album that looked at the post war dream. When 'The Final Cut album was finally released in 1983 there was no WTTBF or any music from the film, 'The Wall.
Between July and December of 1982, 'The Final Cut was born via various recording studios in England. Pink Floyd no longer featured Rick Wright who had played out the live 'Wall shows (1980 and 1981) knowing he was no longer required as Pink Floyd's keyboard player. His replacement on the next Pink Floyd record would be Michael Kamen; who would play piano and harmonium on the album. While Rick Wright didn't appear on the album at all, David Gilmour, who's vocal requirements on 'The Wall had been more sparse than previous Pink Floyd albums, would now only sing lead on one song 'Not Now John. Indeed Dave's very recognisable guitar solos would also hardly appear on the album, it seemed Roger saw 'The Final Cut, more as a solo project. In sound and vocal delivery 'The Final Cut has far more in common with Rogers' solo album 'The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking, than any previous Pink Floyd albums.
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