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Fires of Azeroth (Morgaine Saga, Book 3) Mass Market Paperback – 1979

5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Penguin Putnam~mass (1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0879974664
  • ISBN-13: 978-0879974664
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 2.5 x 12.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,693,167 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you can only read one of the Morgaine trilogy, let it be this one. As with "Well Of Shiuan", this book presents important moral questions to Nhi Vanye and to the reader. But unlike "Well..." this one is far less dark, and not all the characters Vanye and Morgaine encounter are quite as ruthless and self-serving as most of the characters in the previous novel in the series. The dealings of Morgaine and Vanye with the peace-loving humans and qhal of the forest adds a Tolkien-esque air to this particular installment. All this coupled with the development of Roh's character, and Vanye's developing relationship with him, makes for superb reading.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I'm the guy who wrote reviews more or less trashing the first two books of the series, largely because of the repetitive quality of the narrative. The first book does set up the characters and plot, but still dwelled on campires and cold food and finding shelter all too much. The second book continued that trend, but in some ways was worse: e.g. it spent the first few chapters on a character whom the writer just gives up on soon thereafter, and it was repetitious thematically in addition to narratively. The little bit of action suffered from Cherryh's penchant for being cryptic at the crucial moments of confrontation. "Fires of Azeroth" stands in sharp contrast to both, and it rewards the reader who decides to keep reading. The book flies by with fascinating, unique creatures, deep, complex, and fleshed-out characters of all kinds, towns (instead of just wilderness hacking), confrontations, plausible character development and transformation, a very delicate authorial touch on the subtle romantic tension between the two main characters, and action more gripping than I've read in ages. Cherryh still suffers from a tendency to write a bit cryptically during the action scenes, but these make sense (compared to "Wells" the action of which I thought was pretty close to incomprehensible to the reader) here, and are engaging. That's to be preferred, perhaps, to writers who merely dictate the action, or, like Tolkein, keep deferring it (in my opinion). A huge surprise, this is one of the best fantasy books I have ever read. I'd read the first book at a good pace, really blow through the second book, and then savor this one, the third.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This whole series, consisting of "Gate of Ivrel", "Well of Shiuan", "Fires of Azeroth", and "Exile's Gate", is my favorite of any author's, and I've read A LOT.

Cherryh's style is clean and dry, but at the same time very intense and passionate. Instead of using flowery words and melodrama to spoon-feed emotion to the reader, she uses common words and short, almost aggressive phrasing. The tension and passion and danger are drawn with a sharpness and clarity that is almost painful. A deceptively simple word or glance between these characters, whether friends or enemies, will at times bring that tension to a breathless peak, but without the expected release afterwards.

This is not an easy, exciting Harlequin-esque roller-coaster of peaks and valleys. This is a sharp ridge on a bare mountain with an occasional rock slide.

This is not a graceful Puccini aria that makes you want to weep and feel melancholy. This is avant-garde jazz where a single painfully high note is drawn out in the background for so long that you find yourself begging for a release that you fear may never come but then again do you really want it to?

It's exhausting, but in the best sense.

And about the 4th time I read the series, I found that it was funny too! It is, of course, a very dry humor, but it's there. And not a joke or eccentric comedic bit player to be seen.

It's easy to fall in love with these characters. They're very different from each other, but they're both excruciatingly familiar!

Cherryh creates the perfect male characters for a straight female audience. Cherryh's men are the kind many of us would create for ourselves. (Which is very different from the men male writers create.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is One Of The Best Fantasy Books I've Ever Read.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9e0b3b34) out of 5 stars 8 reviews
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9e0046cc) out of 5 stars TENSION ... that makes you beg for more. Jan. 2 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This whole series, consisting of "Gate of Ivrel", "Well of Shiuan", "Fires of Azeroth", and "Exile's Gate", is my favorite of any author's, and I've read A LOT.

Cherryh's style is clean and dry, but at the same time very intense and passionate. Instead of using flowery words and melodrama to spoon-feed emotion to the reader, she uses common words and short, almost aggressive phrasing. The tension and passion and danger are drawn with a sharpness and clarity that is almost painful. A deceptively simple word or glance between these characters, whether friends or enemies, will at times bring that tension to a breathless peak, but without the expected release afterwards.

This is not an easy, exciting Harlequin-esque roller-coaster of peaks and valleys. This is a sharp ridge on a bare mountain with an occasional rock slide.

This is not a graceful Puccini aria that makes you want to weep and feel melancholy. This is avant-garde jazz where a single painfully high note is drawn out in the background for so long that you find yourself begging for a release that you fear may never come but then again do you really want it to?

It's exhausting, but in the best sense.

And about the 4th time I read the series, I found that it was funny too! It is, of course, a very dry humor, but it's there. And not a joke or eccentric comedic bit player to be seen.

It's easy to fall in love with these characters. They're very different from each other, but they're both excruciatingly familiar!

Cherryh creates the perfect male characters for a straight female audience. Cherryh's men are the kind many of us would create for ourselves. (Which is very different from the men male writers create.) Cherryh's men are capable of great valor and honor, but also of very deep emotion and affection, and self-reflection.

Also, her men often feel strong love and affection and respect for other men, without there being any sexual element to it. This is not only unique, but very difficult. The ability to create tension between male characters who love each other without it reading like sexual tension or a Sunday night "family drama" is something I rarely see. I appreciate it when I do.

My circle of friends has a shorthand way of expressing our reaction to this exhausting mix of physical danger and emotional tension, just by groaning "AAAAAHHHHGHHHHGHGHHHHHG!!!". If one of us starts off a conversation this way, another might say "Are you dying, or did you just finish a Cherryh?"
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9e004b34) out of 5 stars Character-driven fiction of the VERY highest quality . . . May 28 2007
By Michael K. Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Wow -- what a climax! The final extended battle scene in this third volume of the trilogy, the summing up of all the threads of plot and character that began in Andur-Kursh months ago -- or maybe thousands of years ago -- all are brought together here. And Cherryh's skill in laying out the scene is such that you don't know what's going to happen until it does. Where the first volume was set in a land of mountains and crags, and the second in a drowning, swampy world, Azeroth is a land of vast forest and vaster plains. The qhal in this world have become the best they could be over the centuries, guarding the forests and the villages of men, laying down laws that ensure peace, and protecting the Gates of their world. Unfortunately, this also makes them difficult to persuade of the need for violence to deal with the scores of thousands of invaders from Hiuaj and Shiun who came through the Gate from their dying home world at the end of the last volume. Vanye is separated again from Morgaine, to whom he is bound by an unbreakable oath, though it's clear now that his regard for his mistress is far stronger than any oath he could take. The character of Roh, Vanye's cousin, inhabited now by an ancient, shape-changing qhal, is also developed with great adeptness and considerable sympathy. Finally, the crescendo of the final chapters is nearly unmatched in fantasy or science fiction, even in Cherryh's other works.
HASH(0x9e004b58) out of 5 stars A many-layered story with several very strong personalities competing for the reader attention. Feb. 4 2016
By Paul F. Brooks - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Fires of Azeroth" - book 3 of the Morgaine cycle - C.J. Cherryh [fantasy novel - February 4, 2016 - 0677]

The Morgaine book series by C.J. Cherryh consist of four novels. The third book "Fires of Azeroth"(1979) is commented upon in this report.

The following is my synopsis of the back-story for the four novels "Morgaine Cycle".

The ancient Qhal Empire expanded and dominated civilizations throughout the Galaxy. The Qhal are human in appearance and can breed, if desired, with other humanoid beings. The teleportation Gates technology the Qhal reversed engineered and utilized for interstellar travel were discovered in ruins on a dead world. The Qhal did not invent the Gates. Using the Gates the ruthless Qhal who despised other "native" beings imposed their wills without remorse. In the end the downfall of the Qhal was in the nature of the Gates. The Gates in addition to providing instantaneous travel between star systems could also be used to travel forward in time. It is speculated from analysis of ancient Qhal artifacts on many worlds that travel back in time unraveled the Qhal civilization. Qujalin are human offspring that have bred with Qhal beings. Morgaine is a Qujalin who has undertaken a quest to go from world to world destroying the master Gates since there influence corrupts societies, nature and individuals. It should be noted that all worlds contain many Gates but only one Master Gate. Shutting down the Master renders them all just dead stone monuments.

I have not been able to definitely determine the motivation that propels Morgaine to go from world to world closing the Gates. Certainly the Gates are inherently evil but was she given a mandate by some council or organization or is she self - motivated, the latter appears to be the case as best I can determine. Her journeys are difficult and dangerous yet her persistence and dedication never waivers. There is enormous opposition to her task since those in power lose all when the Gates is sealed. In addition her actions will inadvertently result in the loss of many lives. Her reputation that proceeds and follows her is that of a witch, bringer of death and bearer of destruction. Fortunately she is in possession of an incredibly magical sword - Changling by name - that is partnered with the mystical evil of the Gates and provides her a weapon that can irrevocably draws individuals to oblivion. How she aquired this incredibly powerful weapon is unknown. Use of the sword takes a psychic toll on her. All the books take place in medieval type world. The technologies evident are body armor and cross bows; horses are the only means of transportation. These pre industrial revolution locals makes for interesting stories but I question if the Qhal who were interstellar travelers what happened to their technology?

These novels combine elements of medieval horse and sword adventures with mythical/magical super science. Many chapters are devoted detailed descriptions of setting up and breaking camp. Grooming the horses and a running narrative of the nuances of landscape and weather.

Vanye the bastard son of Nhi Rijan killed his half-brother Nhi Kandrys and cut off several fingers of his other half-brother Nhi Erij in a fight he was goaded into by the half-brothers. His father was incensed with grief and anger and cursed his son and pronounced him an "ilin" an outcast. Vanye was "claimed" by the Qujalin Morgaine to assist her in defeating a clan leader who aspires for the forbidden knowledge of the Gates. At the stories unfold he becomes her trusted assistant is elimination worlds of Master Gates. Their relationship is akin to a knight and her squire - but a very talented one. He has admirable sword and bow skills and is a skilled horseman. He must attend to grooming the horses, caring for the gear, hunt for game and set up and break down camp. There is a strong undercurrent of resentment, wounded pride and a sexual tension by Vanye towards Morgaine.

"Fires of Azeroth" - book 3 of the Morgaine cycle:

The setting for this book is another alien planet that had in the distant past been an outpost of the Qhal and, as expected has a Master Gate that requires destruction. The planet has earth-like conditions and is populated with men, descendants of the Qhal and a non-human race, the Harilim, with extraordinary powers. Morgaine is forced to confront a group of ancient Qhal who have tempered their native arrogance and rule a pastoral society compassionately. Annihilate the Master Gate will cause them to scatter and dissipate and their civilization to wither. Vanye and Morgaine are almost seduced but remain steadfast to their goal of destroying the Master Gate. The Harilim play a critical role in the story but unfortunately from a readers perspective very little is said who and what they are. One strong undercurrent that propels this story is Vanye's relationship with a cousin. The cousin shares a personality/soul with an evil being merged through Qual powers.

The story laid out in "Fires of Azeroth" exhibits for this reader a more compelling and dramatic narrative that the other three novels. In so far as the novels were published separately - and can be read as a stand-alone story - I would recommend this novel to any individual interested in reading one the Morgaine novels.

These book screams for a glossary of terms - alas there isn't one. The author with a masters of arts in mythology fills her books with cryptic terms for tribal groups, places and locations that, frankly, made following the story difficult for this reader. Alas I had to slow down take a few notes and use some page index tabs to refer back too and I was ok and good to go. It was worth the effort - this is a many-layered story with several very strong personalities competing for the reader attention.

I have read several of Ms. Cherryh's other books and to be honest they are decidedly an acquired taste and put demands on the reader not accustomed to her writing style and narrative pacing. In this book the narrative pacing proceeded glacially. Nonetheless I enjoyed this book and will eventually read the remaining book "Exile's Gate".
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9e004e70) out of 5 stars The apex of the Morgaine series. July 1 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you can only read one of the Morgaine trilogy, let it be this one. As with "Well Of Shiuan", this book presents important moral questions to Nhi Vanye and to the reader. But unlike "Well..." this one is far less dark, and not all the characters Vanye and Morgaine encounter are quite as ruthless and self-serving as most of the characters in the previous novel in the series. The dealings of Morgaine and Vanye with the peace-loving humans and qhal of the forest adds a Tolkien-esque air to this particular installment. All this coupled with the development of Roh's character, and Vanye's developing relationship with him, makes for superb reading.
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9e004ce4) out of 5 stars Stunning: heads and shoulders above the first two books May 3 2002
By N. Caine - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I'm the guy who wrote reviews more or less trashing the first two books of the series, largely because of the repetitive quality of the narrative. The first book does set up the characters and plot, but still dwelled on campires and cold food and finding shelter all too much. The second book continued that trend, but in some ways was worse: e.g. it spent the first few chapters on a character whom the writer just gives up on soon thereafter, and it was repetitious thematically in addition to narratively. The little bit of action suffered from Cherryh's penchant for being cryptic at the crucial moments of confrontation. "Fires of Azeroth" stands in sharp contrast to both, and it rewards the reader who decides to keep reading. The book flies by with fascinating, unique creatures, deep, complex, and fleshed-out characters of all kinds, towns (instead of just wilderness hacking), confrontations, plausible character development and transformation, a very delicate authorial touch on the subtle romantic tension between the two main characters, and action more gripping than I've read in ages. Cherryh still suffers from a tendency to write a bit cryptically during the action scenes, but these make sense (compared to "Wells" the action of which I thought was pretty close to incomprehensible to the reader) here, and are engaging. That's to be preferred, perhaps, to writers who merely dictate the action, or, like Tolkein, keep deferring it (in my opinion). A huge surprise, this is one of the best fantasy books I have ever read. I'd read the first book at a good pace, really blow through the second book, and then savor this one, the third.

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