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Frankenstein Hardcover – Nov 1 2007

4.1 out of 5 stars 343 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Sterling (Nov. 1 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1402743386
  • ISBN-13: 978-1402743382
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 15.9 x 21 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 635 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 343 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #131,194 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From School Library Journal

Grade 7 Up- The name Frankenstein conjures a host of screen and cartoon images. This radio theatre presentation of Mary Shelley's horror story done by the St. Charles Players uses language compatible with the original text. The script is coupled with appropriate sound effects including some bloodcurdling screams. The combination should encourage student listeners to learn about Dr. Victor Frankenstein and his monstrous creation. There are contemporary issues in this classic novel's themes such as the moral implications of scientific discovery and how one person's zeal for success can affect others. Although the emotional portrayal of multiple deaths is sometimes melodramatic and the wooden speech of the monster is appropriately pathetic, overall the company moves briskly and skillfully through the story. This recording is best suited for use as a classroom aid in introducing or reviewing the book. Also, it might prove valuable to students preparing a radio theatre adaptation. The thin cardboard jacket is not sturdy enough for frequent circulation and cover art is minimal. Cassettes are clearly marked, and each side is announced. This presentation of Frankenstein is a useful but not essential purchase for school libraries.
Barbara Wysocki, Cora J. Belden Library, Rocky Hill, CT
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Gr. 8^-12. Part of the Whole Story series, this is the full text of Mary Shelley's classic gothic story, which was first published in 1818 and has been a wild success ever since. Philippe Munch's illustrations have none of the power of Barry Moser's unforgettable woodcuts that evoke the loneliness of the grotesque outsider (in the Pennyroyal edition published by the University of California Press in 1984). The design here is crowded, and the type is small. However, the many period prints and maps in color and in black and white, with long, detailed captions, do provide the historical setting for the story, its geography, customs, and ideas. Teens enthralled by pop versions of the myth as well as science fiction fans will be interested in going back to the full version of what has been called the first science fiction novel and learning about the circumstances under which it was written by a woman, just 18 years old, 170 years ago. Hazel Rochman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
On writing this review, I had to remind myself this novel is 200 hundred years old and likely the first of its kind, and therefore as original as a novel can ever be. Today's horror writers would not get away with the long narratives, wordy dialogue and second (and third) accounts told through various people.

But none of this really mattered. The rich and dense writing style did not get in the way of the story, which drew me in from the first. Poor Frankenstein is doomed the moment he creates the monster and immediately regrets doing so. I had to smile to myself when Frankenstein returns to see the monster gone. 'Thank heavens,' he thinks, 'my troubles are over!' As if! The monster denied a companion or of humanity returns to pick off Frankenstein's loved ones. I felt sorry for the monster that bore no resemblance to the Hollywoodized cliché we imagine. A creepy and dark tale; horror fans who omit this book from their reading list are missing out.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Third or fourth time reading; and I would guess as many times buying a copy - maybe a couple more. Can't go wrong with this classic. This should be read instead of 'A Separate Peace' or 'Lord of the Flies'.
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Format: Paperback
Almost everybody I know has heard of Frankenstein. Maybe not its original story, but various adaptations and references either in movies, music songs, video clips, television, and video games involve Mary Shelley' storyline or its two characters; Victor Frankenstein and his unnamed creature which some people or movies have even named or confused with the title of the book's title/creator's name. For me, it wasn't until I saw Ken Russell's movie Gothic that I decided to read the original story.

In this 200 pages novel, we have a story within a story where Captain Walton, in an epistolary prose, narrates his sailing toward the North Pole and his rescue of Victor Frankenstein he found strapped on a block of ice. Saving the man's life, but also learning the misfortunes that the scientist experienced as he gave birth to a creature whose existence has destroyed his life. In a story about the quest for knowledge and power, but at the terrible cost of several losses.

Of the Arcturus Edition, this novel doesn't have any illustrations apart from the front cover. The text is transcribed in its entirety, along with a summary on Mary Shelly's life. The prose is easily readable, an fusion of both the Gothic and romanticism currents. Lots of descriptions regarding the emotions, torments, and joys of the characters. Making it a very expressive and emotional read.

As such, this novel was a wonderful opportunity to uncover the original story that inspired all those adaptations. Which some have called one of the first example of Science Fiction literature.
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 22 2014
Format: Paperback
Everyone has heard of Frankenstein's monster... or at least the Hollywood version, with green skin, boxy head and bolts in his neck.

But the original creature is quite different in Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein," which starts off rather slow but builds into a tragic, darkly hypnotic tale about tampering in God's domain, and the terrible consequences that come from it. Also: if you create a new creature out of dead body parts, don't disown him or he'll kill your family.

During a trip across the Arctic, a ship picks up a starved, half-frozen man named Victor Frankenstein. As he recovers, Frankenstein tells them his life story -- especially about how he became fascinated with science, and developed a process to reanimate dead tissue. Eventually he constructs a new creature out of dead body parts, and brings him to life.

But while the creature is intelligent and articulate, he's also hideously ugly. Horrified that he's not beautiful, Frankenstein flees... and has a nervous breakdown. Wimp.

But months later, the murder of his little brother brings Victor back to his home, where he figures out that the creature was involved. And to his horror, the creature now wants a mate. But the loathing between them -- caused by Frankenstein's disgust and the creature's increasing bitterness -- leads to even more tragedy...

"Frankenstein" is one of those rare novels that is almost beyond classification -- it's gothic horror, it's sci-fi, it's a tragedy about scientific ambition that goes where it shouldn't go. Mary Shelley was only eighteen years old when she began writing this book, but she interwove religion, science and a fiercely intelligent knowledge of human nature into it.
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By Bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER on Nov. 3 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Victor grew up reading the works of Paracelsus, Agrippa, and Albertus Magnus, the alchemists of the time. Toss in a little natural philosophy (sciences) and you have the making of a monster. Or at least a being that after being spurned for looking ugly becomes ugly. So for revenge the creature decides unless Victor makes another (female this time) creature, that Victor will also suffer the loss of friends and relatives. What is victor to do? Bow to the wishes and needs of his creation? Or challenge it to the death? What would you do?

Although the concept of the monster is good, and the conflicts of the story well thought out, Shelly suffers from the writing style of the time. Many people do not finish the book as the language is stilted and verbose for example when was the last time you said, "Little did I then expect the calamity that was in a few moments to overwhelm me and extinguish in horror and despair all fear of ignominy of death."

Much of the book seems like travel log filler. More time describing the surroundings of Europe than the reason for traveling or just traveling. Many writers use traveling to reflect time passing or the character growing in stature or knowledge. In this story they just travel a lot.

This book is definitely worth plodding through for moviegoers. The record needs to be set strait. First shock is that the creator is named Victor Frankenstein; the creature is just "monster" not Frankenstein. And it is Victor that is backwards which added in him doing the impossible by not knowing any better. The monster is well read in "Sorrows of a Young Werther," "Paradise Lost," and Plutarch's "Lives." The debate (mixed with a few murders) rages on as to whether the monster was doing evil because of his nature or because he was spurned?

The Thirteenth Floor
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