Buy Used
CDN$ 0.84
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ships from the USA. Please allow 14-21 business days for delivery. Very good condition - book only shows a small amount of wear. Biggest little used bookstore in the world.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Friendly Dictatorship Hardcover – Sep 18 2001

4.0 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 43.99 CDN$ 0.84

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
click to open popover

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: McClelland & Stewart; First Edition edition (Sept. 18 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0771080786
  • ISBN-13: 978-0771080784
  • Product Dimensions: 15.9 x 2.4 x 23.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 499 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #225,085 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

From Amazon

Television, Gen-Xers, a Senate that "is an affront to federalism and demo-cracy"--these are just some of the factors Jeffrey Simpson says have allowed Jean Chretien's Liberals the opportunity to maintain a "friendly dictatorship" in Canada for much of the '90s and into the new millennium. In his rampaging, somewhat rambling rant, the Globe and Mail national affairs columnist points out, and attempts to solve, what he sees as the central problem with Canadian democracy: that, due to a combination of voter apathy, media manipulation, a faulty political system, and internal wrangling within opposition parties, the Chretien government has been allowed uncontested access to the leadership of the country. The checks and balances that might hold the government accountable are useless. Question Period in the House of Commons, for instance, "is political theatre" in a manner that, as presented by nightly newscasts, "suggests that otherwise normal people, upon becoming politicians, shout and holler and otherwise make such fools of themselves." While the Conservatives fight amongst themselves, thereby effectively eliminating any chance at consolidating the country's right, the labour-minded NDP has been completely at a loss, "caught in an intellectual time warp." After all, "more Canadians own stock than union cards," as Simpson points out.

Simpson's argument, buttressed with examples gleaned from years of Ottawa-watching, is convincing, and his suggestions for reform sensible. The book is also repetitive (twice Simpson points out that "whole Canadian forests" have been chopped down to produce government reports), fusty on subjects like "chronically unhappy interest groups," and long-winded (do we really need histories of Canada's political parties?). Still, it's necessary reading for anyone interested in the increasingly farcical nature of Canadian politics which, according to The Friendly Dictatorship, is going to get worse before it gets better. --Shawn Conner

About the Author

Jeffrey Simpson, the Globe and Mail’s national affairs columnist, is one of Canada’s premier journalists. He has won several major prizes for his writing during his career at the Globe and Mail. In recognition of his contribution to journalism, in 2000, Simpson was made an Officer of the Order of Canada.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
There isn't a day that goes by that I don't remind myself how lucky I am to live in Canada and by no means do I think the United States is any better with their political system. However, that doesn't mean I will accept everything the Liberals have thrown at us the past nine years like how they've recently blown about $1.6 billion on gun registry.
This book finally points out what I have thought for quite a while now: Canadian voters have no one to complain about other than themselves for our sad political state. People in this country have been blind to what Jean Chretien has done to this country and I put the blame on everyone who has voted Liberal in elections since 1993. This book makes it clear that the people of Canada have to wake up and start voting for other parties or the Liberals will continue to waste our money and embarrass us on a global scale. I just hope people in Canada realise this before we really do become a one-party country. I think this book is a must for all Canadians to read.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
There isn't a day that goes by that I don't remind myself how lucky I am to live in Canada and by no means do I think the United States is any better with their political system. However, that doesn't mean I will accept everything the Liberals have thrown at us the past nine years like how they've recently blown about $1.6 billion on gun registry.
This book finally points out what I have thought for quite a while now: Canadian voters have no one to complain about other than themselves for our sad political state. People in this country have been blind to what Jean Chretien has done to this country and I put the blame on everyone who has voted Liberal in elections since 1993. This book makes it clear that the people of Canada have to wake up and start voting for other parties or the Liberals will continue to waste our money and embarrass us on a global scale. I just hope people in Canada realise this before we really do become a one-party country. I think this book is a must for all Canadians to read.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Jeffrey Simpson offers very insightful and readable commentary on Canadian political systems in his 'The Friendly Dictatorship.' His observations are exactly in line with what I witnessed as an intern with a backbench Government MP in 2001, and his deep understanding of Canadian history adds an essential depth to his analysis.
That said, the title and cover are especially misleading. For someone who decries the media's over-sensationalization of politics, Simpson (or his publisher) obviously panders to the mass market with a bold, emotion-inducing, and sensational title that does not do justice to Simpson's nuanced arguments. Simpson often (perhaps to often) returns in his book to his catch phrase of 'friendly dictatorship,' but each time he does seems more and more forced. Though Simpson makes good points about the dangers of over-centralized government power, it is completely inappropriate to even imply a similarity between Canada and Libya or North Korea.
"The book takes the form, if you like, of four extended essays rather than an academic treatise, but offers no apologies for that." Of the four, the second (Our Friendly Dictators) and fourth (Now What?) were particularly excellent and enjoyable to read, but the first and third are worth your time as well.
The first essay (Prime-Ministerial Government) is well-written and mostly well argued, but comes back too often and too bluntly to the theme of unfettered Primie-Ministerial power. In fact, Simpson's argument is very similar to the ones I often heard from Opposition MPs as they criticized the iron grip Jean Chretien holds over the parliamentary process. Like those MPs, Mr.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse


Feedback