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Full Cry Hardcover – Nov 4 2003

2.3 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books (Nov. 4 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345465199
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345465191
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 3.2 x 24.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 653 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.3 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,301,944 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From the Inside Flap

In the third novel of her captivating foxhunting series, Rita Mae Brown welcomes readers back for a final tour of a world where most business is conducted on horseback-and stables are de rigueur for even the smallest of estates. Here, in the wealth-studded hills of Jefferson County, Virginia, even evil rides a mount.
The all-important New Year's Hunt commences amid swirling light snow. It is the last formal hunt of the season; therefore, participation is required no matter how hungover riders are from toasting the midnight before. On this momentous occasion, "Sister" Jane Arnold, master of the foxhounds, announces her new joint master and the new president of the Jefferson Hunt. And her choices will prove to be no less than shocking.
The day's festivities are quickly marred, though, by what appears on the surface to be an unrelated tragedy. Sam Lorillard, former shining star and Harvard Law School alum, lies dead of a stab wound on a baggage cart at the old train station, surrounded by the outcasts and vagabonds who composed his social circle at the end of life. No one can remember when Sam started drinking, but the downward spiral was swift-and seemingly deadly.
Murder is followed by scandal when Sister Jane discovers dishonest hunting practices going on in a neighboring club. Unsure whether to turn a blind eye or report the infringement to the proper authority, Sister and her huntsman, Shaker Crown, decide to investigate a little further, with the help of their trusty hounds. But when they come a little too close to the staggering truth-and uncover an unforeseen connection to Lorillard's murder-they realize they might not survive to see the next New Year's Hunt.
Intricate, witty, and full of the varied voices of creatures both great and small, "Full Cry is an astute reminder that even those with the bluest of blood still bleed red.

"From the Hardcover edition. --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

About the Author

Rita Mae Brown is the bestselling author of Rubyfruit Jungle, In Her Day, Six of One, Southern Discomfort, Sudden Death, High Hearts, Bingo, Starting from Scratch: A Different Kind of Writers’ Manual, Venus Envy, Dolley: A Novel of Dolley Madison in Love and War, Riding Shotgun, Rita Will: Memoir of a Literary Rabble-Rouser, Loose Lips, and Outfoxed. An Emmy-nominated screenwriter and a poet, she lives in Afton, Virginia.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I'm a big fan of Brown's novels and mysteries, and her latest, "Full Cry," did not disappoint me.
I was hooked from the first pages. It's a great read, especially for horse lovers, giving us an up-close look at the fox-hunting culture - particularly Virginia's deeply traditional version. According to her, for example, fox hunters prefer not to kill healthy foxes at the end of a hunt; instead, they are "run to ground" and left to run another day. According to her, the foxes actually come to enjoy the chase. Could this really be true?
Not only is the plot fascinating, including an unusual twist on a murder mystery - who IS killing all those drunks down at the train station, and why? - it's also packed with odds and ends of information. The reader learns, for instance, much about the history of fox hunting and the training of the dogs; perhaps more even than horse-related information.
As always, Brown's animal-empathetic technique of allowing them a point of view and voice as characters in their own right, remains an improbable but enchanting hallmark of her style. In this novel, Brown demonstrates a deeply empathetic concern for the minorities and the marginal in society. I can agree with her there, although sometimes she does fall into a bit of preachiness.
Altogether, however, a wonderful read, especially appealing to animal lovers.
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By A Customer on April 18 2004
Format: Hardcover
Others have written this book is disappointing because the book description and inside flap blurb don't match the story. This is the least of the novel's problems! I have to preface my review by stating that I'm horse owner, all-around animal lover, and have read all of Rita Mae's work. I'm a big fan.
In the case of this novel, I am baffled that her editor didn't ask her to go back to the drawing board, and I wondered if a crazed fan stole an early rough draft of the book from her desk drawer and somehow got it published on the sly. More bothersome than the fact that foxhunting triva seems to eclipse the mystery storyline is the tendency for Brown to use the novel as vehicle for two things: her opinions on human nature, and a "how-to" manual for rural life. It just got so tedious! Lists of brands her characters prefer, how to fix a hole if a dog digs under the fence, how the Ford F350 Dually handles for everyday driving (she writes about those friggin' trucks in every novel. Enough, please!), how to interpret a foxhound pedigree--geeeeez.
The characters aren't interesting or fully developed, and this seems like unedited stream-of-consciousness rather than a well-crafted tale--which is what Brown usually produces. I'll continue to buy her work, and sure hope this one is the exception.
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By A Customer on April 18 2004
Format: Hardcover
Usually, I love Rita Mae Brown's work--especially the Mrs. Murphy series. I recently got into the Jane Arnold series, and was very excited to read this book. However, within the first 50 pages, my excitement vanished and was replaced with bewilderment.
First off, unless I fell asleep for a while, the murder of "Sam Lorillard, former shining star and Harvard Law School alum, [who is found] ... dead of a stab wound on a baggage cart at the old train station..." never takes place. Sam is still alive and well by the end of the book.
Aside from this glaringly obvious mistake, I found myself wading through page after page of what very well may be Brown's personal pontifications on life, drugs, the state of youth, and illiteracy, all thinly disguised as her characters' opinions during tedious conversations.
I did enjoy the many hunting scenes in this novel. Although heavy on details only a foxhunter would love, Brown does do a fair job of relating the "thrill of the chase" to her readers. It remains to be seen whether I will bother reading her next Jane Arnold attempt.
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By A Customer on Jan. 29 2004
Format: Hardcover
After greatly enjoying the Mrs Murphy mysteries as well as "Outfoxed", I couldn't wait to read "Full Cry". It was a big disappointment. First, the blurb on the cover described a plot that had nothing to do with this book. So what book was it for? At least the blurb sounded interesting. Second, the book was supposed to be a mystery, instead it was either a primer for foxhunting or a romance - I never was sure which and wanted to read neither. The plot was rambling, mostly invisible and seemed like an afterthought, mostly ignored during the main part of the book. The book itself was far too preachy and devoid of many of the things that kept up interest in her other books. The animals were chatty, but either preachy or saying nothing. The foxhunting got overwhelming. How many hunts can you read about in which nothing happens to move the plot along? Unlike her other books, this one seemed to hang up on small details, like the color of Sister's makeup or how many pieces made up a glove. None of this moved the plot along or even contributed to it. It was a very disappointing book. Instead of buying this book, go visit your local library. That way you won't feel taken when the book turns out to be far from what it is represented to be.
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Format: Hardcover
I don't mind if fictional authors occasionally spout some social or moral opinions in their books, usually through their protagonist. Almost all writers do it to some extent or another. But when the length of the book is dependent upon that soap-box preaching, and when the mystery takes such a back seat to that preaching that it is hard to remember what the plot is about, then the writer has gone too far. I enjoy Rita Mae Brown's books. I enjoy this particular series having to do with fox hunting in the U.S. because I suspect if I had been raised in Virginia, I'd be out on the horses too. I really enjoy the backgrounds and historial information that Brown gives in her books. And the anthromorphizing of the hounds, horses, and foxes does not bother me in the least. I've always suspected some animals are smarter then humans anyway...I know many dogs and horses who are nicer then most people.
But...having said all that, Ms. Brown needs to decide whether she wants to sermonize or write a mystery. If she wants to break into nonfiction genre, go for it. But preaching is going to alienate her mystery choir (audience), and it tends to slow down the books and make the books less well-written.
This is a decent book, by a decent author...but newbies to Rita Mae Brown should start with another of her older books, because this one left much to be desired.
Karen Sadler
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