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Gardens of Stone (Sous-titres français) [Import]

4.7 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 44.87
Only 1 left in stock - order soon.
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Product Details

  • Actors: James Caan, Anjelica Huston, James Earl Jones, D.B. Sweeney, Dean Stockwell
  • Directors: Francis Ford Coppola
  • Writers: Nicholas Proffitt, Ronald Bass
  • Producers: Francis Ford Coppola, David Valdes, Fred Roos, Jay Emmett, Michael I. Levy
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, DTS Surround Sound, DVD-Video, Full Screen, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: None
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: None
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : Ages 14 and over
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • Release Date: June 25 2002
  • Run Time: 111 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B000066C6J
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Product Description

Product Description

The story of the war at home and the people who lived through it. From director Francis Coppola (The Rainmaker, The Godfather saga) comes GARDENS OF STONE, a poignant look at stateside military life during the Vietnam War featuring outstanding performances by James Caan, James Earl Jones and Academy Award(r) Winner Anjelica Huston.* "Gardens of Stone" refers to Arlington National Cemetery, its endless rows of tombstones marking the graves of America's fallen war heroes. This garden is tended by the "Old Guard," an elite Army unit led by decorated veterans no longer serving active duty. When brash young recruit Jackie Willow (D.B. Sweeney) is assigned to the unit, he becomes a surrogate son toSgt. Clell Hazard (Caan) and Sgt. Major "Goody" Nelson (Jones). The older men must prepare the younger for the deadly environment of war. Meanwhile, Hazard begins a love affair with an anti-war newspaper reporter (Huston) and Willow rekindles a romance with a former college sweetheart (Mary Stuart

Amazon.ca

The subtext of this grim, snail-paced Francis Ford Coppola film is the death of Coppola's son, Giancarlo, in a boating accident. Coppola came back with this Vietnam-era military drama about the men assigned to patrol and serve at the funerals at Arlington National Cemetery. James Caan is the world-weary patrol leader with a fatherly interest in a gung-ho cadet (D.B. Sweeney). Caan tries to show Sweeney the potentially fatal future that awaits him if he volunteers for combat, but he can't break through his young charge's zealousness. The subplot involves crusty Caan's attempts at romance with Anjelica Huston, who can't quite fathom his contradictions. The story is all glum and lumbering, despite a warm, full-bodied performance by James Earl Jones as one of Caan's buddies. --Marshall Fine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
This movie surprised me in its ingenuity, but then Coppola always does. The story is based on a novel by Nicholas Proffitt, screenplay by Ronald Bass, and explores the physical, emotional and spiritual aspects of war in general and the Vietnam War in particular. Excellent portrayals by an all-star cast make this movie one of the most interesting war movies out there. With lines as: 'Denying yourself is still lying.' and 'Men need to feel good about themselves.' this film digs into the grim reality of the Vietnam War and the doubt that ensued. Real video footage from Vietnam ruthlessly unveils the ugly side of soldiering. I am not really a huge war movie fan, but Gardens of Stone held me from beginning to end.
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Format: VHS Tape
Gardens of Stone is the end of the line for old generals and young privates of the Vietnam War. Before one embarks on a war or support of one, they should watch this film that gets to the heart of the matter, human cost. This movie is the story of the 3rd Infantry, The Old Guard. We see them on parade at WHite House functions and patrolling in front of the tombs of the unkowns but I think it is forgotten that they have a military mission as well. This mission is illustrated in the film, over and above the ceremonial.
James Caan as a tired NCO meeting an eager young soldier. I got the feeling that Caan was seeing himself in this and was trying to prevent a needless tragedy. The young man meets a girl, they get married. He goes to OCS and Vietnam and returns to the Old Guard in a coffin. I think he was understanding what Caan was trying to tell him when he was killed.
This is a difficult movie to watch as Caan attempts to win a woman with strong anti-war feelings. Caan is not exactly anti-war but I think he is speaking from a world weariness of having been in two wars and knows first hand, what this woman can only intelectualize. It is an interesting plot and one that is quite realistic.
This is a sober movie, with a few light moments, but is in reality a realistic look at what life was like for soldiers burying their fellows at Arlington. A must see for anyone with an interest in the cost of war.
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Format: VHS Tape
Can a movie that never actually goes to Vietnam truly portray the horror and tragedy of the war? This movie proves it can be done. Coppola's treatment of the Old Guard during the time of upheaval that was the Vietnam era brings home the true despair that both the public and some members of the military felt during the war.
This movie sports several great performances. James Caan and James Earl Jones in particular stand out. Those two along with D. B. Sweeney, Angelica Huston, Joe Desjardin, Lawrence Fishburn, Dean Stockwell and Sam Bottoms make a great "war" movie without ever showing a battle. The characters develop the story and make this movie worth not just one, but several watches.
There were several great Vietnam movies that came out in the 80's, but as much as any of them, this movie truly brought home the feelings of the time to someone who was not yet an adult during that time.
This movie did not get a lot of publicity that Platoon, Full Metal Jacket and Apocolypse Now received, but it is just as powerful and entertaining as those movies.
See this movie. It is very good.
Now, where is the DVD?
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Format: VHS Tape
This is the most authentic portrayal of the early (late 1960's) Vietnam-era Army I have seen. James Caan as a old platoon sergeant (veteran of Korea and Vietnam), and James Earl Jones is his old friend and Sergeant Major (World War II, Korea, and Vietnam vet). These are the guys I met when I joined the Army in 1968. These are the guys who were killed off or retired when their fourth tour in Vietnam came up. These were the guys who were missing when the Army started rebuilding in the early 1970's.
There is also an up-close-and-personnal view of the Vietnam-era home front, as James Caan's character befriends a promising young soldier, coaches him into OCS, and sees him go off to Vietnam as an infantry platoon leader, not to return.
If you're curious about what the Army was like in the late 1960's, as the casualties from Vietnam were begining to bite on the professional Army, this is the movie to see.
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By A Customer on Feb. 22 1999
Format: VHS Tape
As a soldier in the Army, I saw this movie about 2 years ago, and it left me with tears rolling down my face. This movie touches the depths of the brotherhood that is developed within the confines of the service of this great Country, and tells it with dignaty and grace. James Earl Jone's outstanding portrayal of an well worn Sergeant Major, is done to his normal masterful self. James Caan's charactor is done in such a moving way, that makes me wanna snap a salute, and tell him how great of job he did and that he did the service good with his performance.
The costume department deserves great addoration for the details. I could not find one uniform that did not conform to the Army Regulations that I live by daily.
This is an outstanding movie for anyone who wants to know that soldier really do care!
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Format: DVD
This is a film with a difference -- many people come to it with preconceived notions of how a military-themed film should be, and are somewhat disappointed. This is not an action film, and while it fits the overall genre of being a protest film about Vietnam, it is not unambiguously so. It is an anti-war film, to be sure, but is not an anti-military or even anti-American film. It has an emphasis on duty and honour that transcends minor considerations of the particular patriotism for particular nations -- the themes as old as the Roman centurion's honour for fallen compatriots run through to the Old Guard at Arlington National Cemetary.
The plot winds its way around the Old Guard, the honour guard at Arlington National Cemetary, charged with the performance of a hallowed trust, one of the few in a secular nation such as the United States -- that of overseeing the gravesites of the honoured dead who died after service to the nation, including the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The primary senior characters are Platoon Sergeant Hazard (James Caan) and Sergeant Major Nelson (James Earl Jones), two crusty veterans overseeing operations; both served in Korea and Vietnam with distinction, and are now sitting on the sidelines of the expanding war in Vietnam in a place where the body count is very apparent. Into this mix comes the young and idealistic Specialist Willow (D.B. Sweeney in one of his earliest roles), an Army brat whose father is (of course) a friend of Hazard and Nelson.
Willow has an unrequited love (played by Mary Stuart Masterson) in the daughter of a colonel, who seems to think that the son of a sergeant is beneath his daughter, even as Willow has ambition toward becoming an officer.
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