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The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement Paperback – Jun 1 2012

4.5 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 408 pages
  • Publisher: North River Pr; 3rd Revised, 30th Anniversary ed. edition (June 1 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0884271951
  • ISBN-13: 978-0884271956
  • Product Dimensions: 22.6 x 15.2 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 635 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #35,627 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

'A survey of the reading habits of managers found that though they buy books by the likes of Tom Peters for display purposes, the one management book they have actually read from cover to cover is The Goal.' The Economist 'Goldratt's system, in essence, forces production managers and workers alike to coordinate their work-with an underlying principle in mind: that 'bottlenecks'...are what ultimately constrain the manufacturing environment.' Business Week 'This theory provided a persuasive solution for factories struggling with production delays and low revenues.' Harvard Business Review 'Like Mrs. Fields and her cookies, The Goal was too tasty to remain obscure. Companies began buying big batches and management schools included it in their curriculums.' Fortune Magazine 'Anybody who considers himself a manager should rush out, buy and devour this book immediately. If you are the only one in your place to have read it, your progress along the path to the top may suddenly accelerate...one of the most outstanding business books I have ever encountered.' Punch Magazine 'Goal readers are now doing the best work of their lives.' Success Magazine 'The Goal has always been essential reading for those looking to eliminate bottlenecks from their business. The latest edition also shows how its ideas have been applied in real life.' Works Management ' Written in the style of a novel it treats the subject of ongoing personal development in a unique way. although the scene is set in a US manufacturing company it can easily be transferred to your business. You will learn as you read this story, recognizing the changes you need to make as you progress. Definitely a book to read...' The Hairdresser --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Jeff Cox is the co-author or author of seven works of business fiction, which include "The Goal", "Zapp", "The Quadrant Solution", "Heroz", "The Venture", "Selling the Wheel" and "The Cure". Both "Zapp" and "The Goal" ranked first and second, respectively, on a list of bestselling business books from the 1990s. Jeff and his family live near Pittsburgh, PA.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Eliyahu Goldratt's "The Goal" is an entertaining novel and at the same time a thought provoking business book. The story is about a plant manager, Alex Rogo, whose plant and marriage are going downhill. He finds himself in the unenviable position of having ninety days in which to save his plant. A fortuitous meeting with an old acquaintance, Jonah, introduces him to the Theory of Constrains (TOC). He uses this new way of thinking to ...
TOC postulates that for an organization to have an ongoing process of improvement, it needs to answer three fundamental questions:
1. What to change?
2. To what to change?
3. How to cause the change?
The goal is to make (more) money, which is done by the following:
1. Increase Throughput
2. Reduce Inventory
3. Reduce Operating Expense
Goldratt defines throughput (T) as the rate at which the system generates money through sales. He also defines inventory (I) as everything the system invests in that it intends to sell. Operating expense (OE) is defined as all the money the system spends in order to convert inventory into throughput.
The author does an excellent job explaining his concepts, especially how to work with constraints and bottlenecks (processes in a chain of processes, such that their limited capacity reduces the capacity of the whole chain). He makes the reader empathize with Alex Rogo and his family and team. Don't be surprised if you find yourself cheering for Alex to succeed.
The importance and benefits of focusing on the activities that are constraints are clearly described with several examples in "The Goal". One example from the book is the one in which Alex takes his son and a group of Boy Scouts out on a hiking expedition. Here Alex faces a constraint in the form of the slowest boy, Herbie.
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Format: Paperback
The Goal is a fantastic business novel that wraps up a whole lot of common sense that most of us miss. The novel follows Alex Rogo, a manager in a manufacturing plant that is in danger of going out of business as he and his team figure out how to get back into the black and making money. Aside from being a reasonably well written novel, the advice provided through out the book is great and has application in many more areas of business and industry than just manufacturing.

The first point of common sense it comes to is the goal of any business. In its simplest form, the goal of every business should be to make money. This gets elaborated on more in the statement: The goal is to make money by increasing net profit while simultaneously increasing ROI and simultaneously increasing cash flow. This is done through these areas:
Throughput: the rate a system generates money through sales. This is your money coming into the system.
Inventory: all the money that the system has invested in purchasing things which it intends to sell. This is money stuck in the system.
Operational Expense: All the money the system spends in order to turn inventory into throughput. This is the money going out of the system.

While all of this will likely make sense to anyone in business, the even more valuable lesson learned within the book is the importance of measuring these three areas and NOT worrying so much about irrelevant measurements, which is pretty much every other measurement we seem to use. Examples of what not to measure in manufacturing seemed to focus around efficiencies and keeping people busy while in software, it would be common measurements such as lines of code written per hour or a daily defect fix rate.
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By alks on Oct. 4 2011
Format: Paperback
I recommend this book with all my heart to the regular folk, especially to ones that find themselves putting fires out daily. I love the fact that you have to make your own deductions to learn anything out of the book, which then stays with you for a life time. Nothing is put in front of you in a silver plate. I praise Mr. Goldratt.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book had way too much filling and beating around the bush to finally get to the point. There were about three key ideas explained in the book within 300 pages, which could have all easily been summarized in less than a couple pages. Its a fun novelization, but not worth much as tool to learn about the manufacturing industry.
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Recommendation: a worthy read for a secondary educational program, but not university and most critically not Amazon worthy (a required reading for Amazon mangers; this is concerning).

Outdated concepts and situations have been laid out in a very inconsistent manner. Frankly, Alex Rogo and his team are not suited for their positions, as they never understand their job to begin with, nor the targets and plant performance, especially with an abundance of resources at their fingertips. When push came to shove, they were all ambushed by a short term target and had little clue why. Concepts so basic stumped long employed managers, a teaching that is very concerning if companies hire management recruits who do not actually understand common sense business.

Because of this, it is my opinion that this is not a proper leadership and operations management novel suited for university and corporate programs.

Strongly recommend do not buy - business has evolved so great that this is such basic concepts not worth your read.
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