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Good in Bed Hardcover – May 1 2001

4.2 out of 5 stars 539 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Atria (May 1 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743418166
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743418164
  • Product Dimensions: 24.1 x 3.2 x 16 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 658 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 539 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #920,646 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

It is temping at first but unwise to assume Candace Shapiro is yet another Bridget Jones. Feisty, funny and less self-hating than her predecessor, Cannie is a 28-year-old Philadelphia Examiner reporter preoccupied with her weight and men, but able to see the humor in even the most unpleasant of life's broadsides. Even she is floored, however, when she reads "Good in Bed," a new women's magazine column penned by her ex-boyfriend, pothead grad student Bruce Guberman. Three months earlier, Cannie suggested they take a break apparently, Bruce thought they were through and set about making such proclamations as, "Loving a larger woman is an act of courage in our world." Devastated by this public humiliation, Cannie takes comfort in tequila and her beloved dog, Nifkin. Bruce has let her down like another man in her life: Cannie's sadistic, plastic surgeon father emotionally abused her as a young girl, and eventually abandoned his wife and family, leaving no forwarding address. Cannie's siblings suffer, especially the youngest, Lucy, who has tried everything from phone sex to striptease. Their tough-as-nails mother managed to find love again with a woman, Tanya, the gravel-voiced owner of a two-ton loom. Somehow, Cannie stays strong for family and friends, joining a weight-loss group, selling her screenplay and gaining the maturity to ask for help when she faces something bigger than her fears. Weiner's witty, original, fast-moving debut features a lovable heroine, a solid cast, snappy dialogue and a poignant take on life's priorities. This is a must-read for any woman who struggles with body image, or for anyone who cares about someone who does.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Weiner's first novel should satisfy readers from older teens and above. Cannie Shapiro is in her late twenties, funny, independent, and a talented reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer. After a "temporary" break-up with her boyfriend of three years, she reads his debut column, "Good in Bed," in the women's magazine Moxie. Titled "Loving a Larger Woman," this very personal piece triggers events that completely transform her and those around her. Cannie's adventures will strike a chord with all young women struggling to find their place in the world, especially those larger than a size eight. Despite some events that stretch credulity and a few unresolved issues at the end, this novel follows the classic format of chasing the wrong man when the right one is there all along. Veteran storyteller Maeve Binchy gave us Bennie in Circle of Friends; now Jennifer Weiner gives us Cannie. Look for more books from Weiner. Rebecca Sturm Kelm, Northern Kentucky Univ. Lib., Highland Heights
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Like others who hated this book, I really wanted to enjoy it. Like the main character, I'm a fat word-lover, often too smart and sarcastic for my own good, who considered the Pink Rose Bakery in Philadelphia a second home. Unfortunately, I spent most of my time screaming at this book, and when I was finally finished I threw it against my wall. On the one hand, I admire the author for presenting a full-figured, flawed character. However, Cannie, the heroine, remains self-centered, self-pitying, immature, judgmental, condesceding, elitist, and cruel throughout the whole book, and is repeatedly indulged by friends, loved ones, and worst of all the author, Jennifer Weiner. Weiner allows Cannie to dance through life without having to take responsibility for herself, and the "redemption" she experiences rings false. Worse, the book is littered with cliches, including, most offensively, a lesbian with two cats named Gertrude and Alice, who is reviled by Cannie and her siblings even though it may be the closest her mother has come to a partner in her life. I pity the lesbian reader who reads this book and encounters such a one-dimensional, snide rendering of a stereotype.
A thing that aggravates me about reviews of this book is that many claim it's better than Bridget Jones because the character is heavier, a "real fat woman." I found Bridget a lot more likeable, regardless of her weight, because you got to see her standing by her friends. Cannie seems to have friends who treat her a lot better than she treats them, or herself. While I'm sure that the author saw Cannie as very kind, the glimpses of a loving Cannie are few and far between her monologues of self-loathing.
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Format: Paperback
I just got done reading Tino Georgiou's masterpiece--The Fates, and thought Good in Bed would be just the same old vapid chick-lit. Yeah, an overweight woman insecure about her weight. Wow, that's reinventing the wheel. Yet Cannie was different. She wasn't middle aged, like most protagonists in such works, she was in her late twenties. She wasn't an unattractive recluse who did nothing but eat all day. She was actual cultured, articulate and intelligent with an active social life. The book tended to be a bit topical at times, like Cannie's mother announcing at 56 years old she's a lesbian. But Cannie is uncomfortable with this, like most people would be. Despite being a Princeton graduate, living in Philadelphia, working for a newspaper their (a recipe for being a liberal if I ever heard one) Cannie cannot bring herself to put on a happy face about this development. Even the more farfetched events that take place don't seem so farfetched when written in Cannie's glib, self-deprecating voice. While not much on plot (an aspect that doesn't bother me as characters should dictate your plot not the other way around) the characters and stories are more than engaging. If you missed Tino Georgiou's novel--The Fates, I'd recommend reading that instead.
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Format: Paperback
It can be difficult to read books that are as painfully truthful as Jennifer Weiner's first novel. However, "Good In Bed", while painful at times, is also fun and touching.
In the book, we meet Cannie (a thouroughly modern woman struggling with life's complexities). Cannie's biggest problem is a BIG problem, she is overweight. The book is Cannie's journey to come to terms with how others see her and more importantly how she sees herself. There are definatley road bumps along the way. Large road bumps along the way. Cannie's ex writes a tell all article for a rival magazine about "loving a larger woman".
Any woman will appreciate Cannie's sense of humor as she deals with all of the implications of Bruce's betrayal and as she struggles to make the right choices.
In the end, the reader will appreciate the ending as much as they appreciate the path to get there. I purchased this book through Amazon.com right after another great purchase, THE LOSERS' CLUB: Complete Restored Edition by Richard Perez, about a writer addicted to the personals. Both are fun, recommended books. Enjoy!
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Format: Hardcover
Having been a fan of Jennifer Weiner's column in the "Philadelphia Inquirer", I was not surprised to become a fan of her first novel, "Good in Bed". Every single woman can identify with some part of the main character, Cannie, who is an amazing person yet has been rendered insecure by a bumpy family history, poor male influences and a society that has bought into the beauty before substance equals worth equation. But Cannie perseveres, as we all do, and carves out a path through a series of positives and negatives all the while offering a bitingly sarcastic commentary of the people and world around her. Even in this work of fiction, women who don't fit the "Sex and the City" mold can see that they are not alone. After finishing this book, I felt inspired - to do what I'm not sure, but it's still a great feeling to have. I highly recommend this book and hope that Jennifer will continue writing for all women.
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Format: Paperback
It can be difficult to read books that are as painfully truthful as Jennifer Weiner's first novel. However, "Good In Bed", while painful at times, is also fun and touching.
In the book, we meet Cannie (a thouroughly modern woman struggling with life's complexities). Cannie's biggest problem is a BIG problem, she is overweight. The book is Cannie's journey to come to terms with how others see her and more importantly how she sees herself. There are definatley road bumps along the way. Large road bumps along the way. Cannie's ex writes a tell all article for a rival magazine about "loving a larger woman".
Any woman will appreciate Cannie's sense of humor as she deals with all of the implications of Bruce's betrayal and as she struggles to make the right choices.
In the end, the reader will appreciate the ending as much as they appreciate the path to get there. I purchased this book through Amazon.com right after another great purchase, THE LOSERS' CLUB: Complete Restored Edition by Richard Perez, about a writer addicted to the personals. Both are fun, recommended books. Enjoy!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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