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Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch Mass Market Paperback – 1991

4.6 out of 5 stars 358 customer reviews

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CDN$ 2.07 CDN$ 1.93

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Corgi; Reprint edition (1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060853980
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060853983
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.2 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 45 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 358 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #54,247 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you wonder sometimes about good and evil and what it might all mean ... And it wouldn't hurt to have sat through a lot of church sermons thinking "Really?", then read this book. Lots of fun, I loved the characters, and pretty deep in spite of the laughs.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Bad news. The Apocalypse is coming. Soon. Luckily, Heaven and Hell have left the business with the Anti-Christ in the hands of Crowley and Aziraphale, demon and angel respectively. Now they have misplaced the Anti-Christ and pretty much decided they really like humanity a lot more than their either of their bosses.
In the first edition, the full title of this book was "The Nice & Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch." "Nice," in this context, meaning precisely correct. Agnes saw it all coming, from her being burned alive as a witch to the air force base where Armageddon will begin ("Peas is our professiune."). Agnes, her descendant, Anathema, the Four Horseman - Horsepersons - and the Other Four Horseman (a different chapter of Hell's Angels); it all comes together with the serried ranks of angels and demons gathered overhead.
Yes, this is an hysterically funny book. A satire and a parody, it lampoons everything in sight. From Elvis sightings to televangelists to the destruction of all intelligent life ("nothing left but dust and fundamentalists."), little escapes the scathing wit of Gaiman and Pratchett.
Of course the demon, Crowley, drives a 1926 Bentley. Of course any tape left in its glove box for more than two weeks turns into something by Queen. Of course the flaming sword used by War is delivered to her by International Express.
And what happens to the telephone solicitor, Lisa Morrow? Come on now, you secretly thought all telephone solicitors deserved it, right?
In the tradition of Jonathan Swift and Mark Twain, the satire makes a point. That point may be unpalatable to the religiously inflexible, or to those whose sense of righteousness hampers their sense of humor.
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Format: Paperback
Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman are both master storytellers, whose books are constantly humorous, insightful, fantastic, and intelligent. Having them both work together in penning a tale about the Apocalypse, from the perspectives of an angel and a demon who are friendly and both kind of distressed that this rather pleasant world is about to get destroyed, but don't quite know how to stop it, is almost too good to be true. This is a light read, but it provides a great adventure full of laughs. I absolutely loved it, and it was also the first book I read by either author, although I had heard so much praise for both (and was not disappointed!) After reading GOOD OMENS I can say that I am a fan for life of both authors and am eagerly reading the rest of their works. The style is also a bit reminiscent of Douglas Adams, and fans of the HITCHHIKER or DIRK GENTLY novels may want to check this out, as well.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Think Monty Python meets Douglas Adams' Hitchiker's Guide. Throw in a bit of Dogma (the Kevin Smith film), and you have this book. If you like all three of these, you'll probably enjoy Good Omens. It helps to have a basic understanding of Biblical prophecy and a bit of appreciation for British humor. Without these, you might get a bit lost.
The only thing I didn't like about this book is that I had a hard time figuring out where it was going a lot of the time. It felt like there were a lot of unnecessary scenes. I kept waiting and waiting for the Apocalypse to come around, but it seemed to take forever.
Still, it was worth reading. I laughed outloud at several of the jokes, and the two main characters--the representitves from heaven and hell pictured on the cover were hysterical. It's worth the seven dollars just for them.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I love this book! The first time I came across it, it was hidden in a corner in a bookstore. It cried out to me. I had to take it home. I laughed so hard that I cried, more than once. I loved it so much I gave it away. Which is an extraordinarily difficult thing for me to do. But it wanted to be shared, and I can't deny a book its destiny. My brain, however, is not so capable of release. I had to buy it again. And read it over and over and over. Until I gave it to my boyfriend, before we were dating. And still, I read it at his house. When he forgot and gave it back to me, I cruelly didn't correct him. (It came back to me! It must be fate!) Now, there's a new edition out, with comments by the authors. I have to go get it.

I'm obsessed. It's unhealthy. I know. Come join me. It's the best apocalypse you'll ever survive.

Crowley and Aziraphale have been locked in the battle between good and evil since, well, at least the beginning of time. In fact, it's been so long that it's become more of a debate then a battle. Actually more of a conversation. Aziraphale is an angel, and part-time rare bookseller. It's a front; he really collects the books for himself. Crowley is sort of a fallen angel; well, as the book says "an angel who did not so much fall as saunter vaguely downward". So he's a demon, ish. Mostly he's an instigator. These two have been enemies for so long that they've become pretty good friends.

But that's all going to end. Everything is going to end. Next Saturday. That's when the apocalypse has been scheduled for. The final battle between good and evil. What's an angel, or demon, to do when it comes time to end the world, but they really don't want to?
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