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House of Wax [Blu-ray] [Import]

4.1 out of 5 stars 46 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Format: Blu-ray, Multiple Formats, NTSC, 3D, Widescreen, Import
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • Release Date: Oct. 1 2013
  • Run Time: 88 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 46 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B00DQLQN3S
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Product Description

Product Description

HOUSE OF WAX (2005/HD/3D/BLU-RAY) (3-D)

Amazon.ca

House of Wax brought Vincent Price into the horror genre, where he fit as snugly as a scalpel in a mad scientist's hand. A remake of the 1933 film Mystery of the Wax Museum, this entertaining Gothic shocker casts Price as a sculptor of wax figures; his unwilling victims--er, "models"--lend their bodies to his lifelike depictions of Marie Antoinette and Joan of Arc. The film was one of the top 10 moneymakers of its year, thanks in part to the 3-D gimmick, which explains why so many things are aimed at the camera (why else would the paddleball man be there?). Footnote to history: director Andre De Toth was blind in one eye, and thus could not see in three dimensions. --Robert Horton --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
VIDEO:

“House of Wax” 3D arrives on blu-ray with MPEG-4 MVC 1080p 1.37:1 encode. First of all, high praise must be given to Warner Brothers for its wonderful restoration, using a 4K scan of the original dual-projection film elements by the highly regarded Warner Bros. Motion Picture Imaging (MPI) team. With lots of depth and dimensionality, objects in the far distance penetrate deep into the screen, making large open rooms feel incredibly spacious and expansive. Actors walk from foreground to background and vice versa with stunning realism, and separation between various items is flawless, creating the sort of layered effect that also feels natural. The few gimmick shots, like the famous paddleball sequence, protrude and jump from the screen almost as if the ball bounces in the middle of the room or threatens to hits someone in the audience. Colours are rich and blacks are deep. The picture would look soft at times, but this has more to do with the filmmaking process of the period than a fault in the encode. One point I appreciate from watching an old movie with detailed restoration is not how razor sharp the picture is, but rather than how accurate it was when compared to the original film. This is a very enjoyable 3D experience. (4.5/5)

AUDIO:

“House of Wax” was one of the first films to introduce stereophonic sound which required two 35mm fully-coated magnetic prints containing audio for separate Left-Center-Right channels, which the studio dubbed as “WarnerPhonic”. Arriving on blu-ray for the first time, this DTS-HD stereo soundtrack accurately reflects and faithfully reproduces the original design to great effect.
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Format: DVD
I mananged to see a version of "House of Wax" on Turner Classic Movies and I thought that it was a great horror movie. Not being a big fan of horror films, I can't compare to other ones of that time, but this one was great. It stars horror movie legend Vincent Price and a young Charles Bronson who is credited as Charles Buchinsky. Having been to wax museums in the past, I can relate to the fact that after seeing the was figures for so long, you could begin to believe that all of the people around you who are not moving are actually made of wax, something that was briefly mentioned in the movie. A big problem with the movie was that it was made in 3D during its first release. This could create a problem for the present viewings because some things are pointless. They made things for the movie just so people can see the 3D effect. For example, a three minute sequence of women dancing, throwing their legs in the air. When it was made, it was cool seeing the legs come out of the screen, but while I was watching it, it was pretty much pointless.
The movie begins with Vincent Price as Professor Henry Jarrod. He takes pride in his wax figures which he often refers to as his friends. They speak to him, and he understands them well, and how they want to be made. In a way to make more money, an investor burns up the museum and flees the sight leaving Jarrod for dead. A couple of years later, people begin to disappear, kidnapped in the night. This happens at the same time that Jarrod, who is now in a wheelchair, wants to reopen his museum, with new figures that resemble some of the people that disappeared. He claims that he uses pictures of the missing people in the paper as a muse for the figures, but a women named Sue knows better.
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Format: DVD
Has anyone ever portrayed the Nice Man Gone Crazy as well as Vincent Price? Of course not, and in House of Wax, Price is in top form as a loving sculptor who emerges from a fire with a different, errr, method for creating his wax sculptures. I don't know about you, but just the thought of being alone in a wax museum after dark gives me the creeps. Add a dose of homicidal mania, and there's your recipe for terror.
Most people will find this movie creepy even today; those who love camp will enjoy the prolonged ping-pong paddle scene catered to the orginal 3-D audience.
All in all, one of Vincent Price's best films, proving once again that nobody goes horribly insane quite like Vincent Price.
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Format: DVD
1953's "House Of Wax" launched the career of horror film star Vincent Price. He would later become the king of classic horror films from the 50's, including House On Haunted Hill, the original The Fly and others. This is a remake of the 30's version, which on DVD, comes as an extra bonus. Vincent Price stars as a wronged artist whose wax figures, stunningly life like, cause a jealous rival to burn down his museum. I may be mistaken but I saw this film a while ago late night but I'm sure that's the plot. The fire also left Vincent Price's character horribly scarred so that he looks like the Phantom Of The Opera.
The wronged artist takes his revenge by creating a House Of Wax or Chamber Of Horrors in the style of today's Ripley's Believ It Or Not Museum. Wax figures pose in scenes of dramatic violence taken directly from history - the beheading of the wives of Henry the 8th in Tudor England, the burning of Joan of Arc, the guillotine executiones of the French Revolution, etc and a very impressive Ford's Theatre replica in which John Wilkes Booth shoots Abraham Lincoln. Vincent Price's character is killing his victims and then uses their corpses as wax statues. The heroine of the film picks up on his little scheme since the death of her friend (played by Carolyn Jones who would later play the role of the tv mom Morticia Addams in The Addams Family 1964-1966). Her body became encased in wax as the Joan of Arc statue. The film was originally made for 3-D, the current rage in the movies of the 50's especially for sci-fi films and monster movies. Much of the movie is scary because it's so subtle. The creepy, eerie sense of being alone in a wax museum, where the eyes of the figures watch you is very predominant.
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