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Into The Labyrinth (Ltd Ed) Original recording remastered, Hybrid SACD

4.3 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 269.93
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Frequently Bought Together

  • Into The Labyrinth (Ltd Ed)
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Total price: CDN$ 304.23
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 24 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Hybrid SACD, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Select Distributions
  • ASIN: B0015YFOHY
  • In-Print Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #180,720 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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Product Description

Product Description

The 2016 LP version is a double LP like the original release, but will come with brand new cover artwork and an altered track sequence. Into The Labyrinth (1993) is Dead Can Dance’s sixth album, one of their most successful releases, its title a reference to the Greek legend of Theseus going into the Labyrinth to slay the Minotaur. It came when Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard had embarked on more individual personal paths, now writing their songs independent of one another, and on separate continents. Engineered and produced by Brendan at his Quivvy Church studio in Ireland, the album is an audiophile benchmark and also noted for being their first without any guests, instead they played all the instruments.

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Their goth-sounding name and dour visual image aside, the prolific duo of Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard produce wildly eclectic but utterly unique music. Their painstakingly crafted albums encompass numerous arcane genres, from European classical music to ancient Celtic and Middle Eastern folk styles, often employing authentic antique instruments to achieve their ambitious, emotive soundscapes. The 1993 effort Into the Labyrinth found Dead Can Dance mixing their medieval leanings with more exotic Eastern influences on "Saldek" and "Yulunga," while exploring Celtic balladry on the traditional "The Wind That Shakes the Barley" and theatrical songcraft in their interpretation of Bertolt Brecht's "How Fortunate Is the Man with None." --Scott Schinder --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
This CD was recommended to me years ago by Clive Barker during a promotional signing for his (rather blah) Razorline comics. The recording floored me back in '93, but not until the past few months have I become equal to its breadth and design. I'd like to take a moment to try and understand why it took me seven years to "thread" this extraordinary sonic achievement.
*Into the Labyrinth* is what synthesizer technology was made for. The "upgrading" of human spirituality and expression, the surgical transposition of tonal multiplicity, the democratic rendering of "world-beat" multiculturalism beyond all notions of ethnocentric culture-mongering.
Granted, I normally avoid music that requires racks of digital equipment to get itself off the ground. I'd prefer to hear the squish of sweaty calluses sliding across nickelwound strings, feedback woofing through analog speaker cabinets, a real live acoustic drum set and bass guitarist sweating bullets on a 30-minute prog-rock epic. But the power-duo of Dead Can Dance, along with their arsenal of machines and recording-technology, have ensouled their music in waves of digital sorcery as moving and "organic" as the most bare-bones unplugged meat-and-potatoes blues number. Even the pastoral a cappela "Wind that Shakes the Barley" is rendered with so much digital reverb my speakers buzz and vibrate whenever I spin that track. If nothing else, Brendan Perry's machine-savvy production values stand as an inspiring artistic rebuttal to the lurid vulgarizations of "techno" music with its chooming BASS BASS BASS thundering out of car stereos these days.
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Format: Audio CD
Oddly enough, if this album was made by any other artist that's even similar to Dead Can Dance it would have received five stars. But I couldn't help but feel something was missing here, something missing from Dead Can Dance. This is not their best album, not by a long shot. And upon finishing "Into The Labyrinth" my initial reaction was somewhat disheartening. One of my favorite bands has made a great album (for the non-Dead Can Dance fan, great doesn't measure up to their usual standard of perfection). Great isn't a bad thing though, and this album has it's moments, but something is definitely missing. It starts off with "Yulunga (Spirit Dance)", it has an arabic feel to it and sets the flow of the album. The follow up, "The Ubiquitous Mr. Lovegrove" is along the same vein of "Yulunga". Those are two great songs, but still, their Arabic/Egyptian feel is not as uplifting as a Dead Can Dance fan would hope. Thankfully, what might be the best song here, "The Wind That Shakes The Barley" left me in awe. The beauty and power of Lisa Gerrard's voice is something not of this realm. And "The Carnival Is Over" lives up to that as well thanks to Brendan Perry and his crystal-clear voice. Sadly, the album takes a dip. "Ariadne" is great, and "Towards The Within" isn't bad, but "Saldek" is complete filler in my opinion. "Tell Me About The Forest (You Once Called Home)" is breathtaking, yet another highlight. It drops the Arabic/Egyptian feel for a more Gothic/Arcane one. Very nice.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
The name "Dead Can Dance" speaks so much...the music, inspired by ancient roots, is lifted, at first silent, from the dust. New life makes the dry bones come to life like the movement of feathers, slowly changing color, where the wind catches the words and the notes and the heart strings and slowly......with eyes coated in dreaming, it begins to dance.
This music speaks of the old ones, memories, feelings of home and remembrance....reviving the past if only for an hour or so...bringing that sacred remembrance and thankfulness to those of the past, ancesters, the elder ones....those who are turned to dust still remembered in the hidden corners of our minds....
Although this album is not as smooth or as flowing as some of the opther Dead can Dance albums, there are haunting harmonies and beautiful vocals. There is a beautifully somber version of "the wind that shakes the barley" on this cd, and the almost middle eastern vocals of lisa gerrard kiss you on the cheek and reach into your soul while tickling your heart as it starts to bleed....very emotional and intense, if you are in the right mood for it, but not if you are feeling sarcastic or fidgety. You have to almost be willing to lie down and just listen...or to let yourself dance.
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Format: Audio CD
After many spins in my CD player, this CD has become one of my favorite DCD albums. Of course, when I first got the CD, I would never have said that. It just seemed really strange to me then. Luck for me, this CD was not my introduction to DCD, which was The Serpent's Egg (their finest, in my opinion, due to the marvelous song "The Host of Seraphim"). So, while I recommend this album to all true music lovers, you should be aware that it was a turning point in DCD's musical career, and it is very different from their earlier more European, Classical works, which I heartily recommend you sample first. The best songs on the album for me are: "Ariadne," "Yulunga," and "Towards the Within." A lot of people I know also like "The Ubiquitous Mr. Lovegrove" and "The Carnival is Over." Finally, I would like to point out that this is DCD's best selling album but not necessarily their absolute best overall, although I really love it.
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