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Introspective Import

4.3 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 16 1995)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: EMI/Capitol
  • ASIN: B00000633N
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews
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1. Left To My Own Devices
2. I Want A Dog
3. Domino Dancing
4. I'm Not Scared
5. Always On My Mind/In My House
6. It's Alright

Product Description

Product Description

Remastered & repackaged reissue of 1988 compilation includes 36 page booklet featuring exclusive photos & liner notes along with a 15 track bonus disc packed with rarities & remixes. EMI.

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Avec ce troisième album, Neil Tennant et Chris Lowe regagnent les dance floors en beauté. Six morceaux dont la durée moyenne dépasse les huit minutes composent Introspective, paru en 1988. Légèrement influencé par l'air du temps, rythmes latins et textures sonores empruntés à la house music des débuts, ce disque ressort au final comme l'un des meilleurs albums de disco-pop de l'époque. Proche par le détachement des paroles, cérébrales, de l'écriture stylée, clinique et froide de Brett Easton Ellis, Introspective explore en dansant la distance et le détachement propres aux yuppies des années quatre- vingt. La reprise de "It's Alright", morceau club classique de Blaze, est l'un des sommets du disque, sophistiqué et esthétique à souhait. --Florent Mazzoleni --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
The Pet Shop Boys have a habit of releasing 'minor' albums between their major releases. Between their first and second albums, Please and Actually, they released Disco, a six-track piece which featured no real new material, but rather remixes of previously released tracks (some primary, some B-side works).
Between Actually and Behaviour, the Pet Shop Boys released this album, Introspective, another minor album, with six tracks. However, this time there was new material--remixes of two previously released pieces, and four new works. This was done in an interesting format--each of the tracks on the album were in the form of 'extended dance versions', usually the kind of thing one gets when purchasing the single apart from the album. However, to get the tradition 'album' version of songs such as Domino dancing, Left to my own devices, or It's alright, one had to purchase the singles. This was an interesting marketing ploy, and extended the sales and life of this small album far beyond what it otherwise would have had.
Domino dancing was released first, and a classic Pet Shop Boys sound took over dance floors worldwide, combined with a Latin rhythm which was also in vogue during the fall of 1988. This had also perhaps the last MTV-hit video for the Pet Shop Boys; after this time, the videos released by the Pet Shop Boys no longer fit the game-show-and-rap-video dominated MTV schedule, although their videos continued to be played extensively on Euro-MTV.
Left to my own devices features more of the signature obscure-intellectual lyrics that Neil Tennant has been noted for:
I was faced by a choice at a difficult age,
would I write a book, or should I take to the stage,
but in the back of my head, I heard distant feet
Che Guevara and Debussy to a disco beat.
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Format: Audio CD
The Pet Shop Boys have a habit of releasing 'minor' albums between their major releases. Between their first and second albums, Please and Actually, they released Disco, a six-track piece which featured no real new material, but rather remixes of previously released tracks (some primary, some B-side works).
Between Actually and Behaviour, the Pet Shop Boys released this album, Introspective, another minor album, with six tracks. However, this time there was new material--remixes of two previously released pieces, and four new works. This was done in an interesting format--each of the tracks on the album were in the form of 'extended dance versions', usually the kind of thing one gets when purchasing the single apart from the album. However, to get the tradition 'album' version of songs such as Domino dancing, Left to my own devices, or It's alright, one had to purchase the singles. This was an interesting marketing ploy, and extended the sales and life of this small album far beyond what it otherwise would have had.
Domino dancing was released first, and a classic Pet Shop Boys sound took over dance floors worldwide, combined with a Latin rhythm which was also in vogue during the fall of 1988. This had also perhaps the last MTV-hit video for the Pet Shop Boys; after this time, the videos released by the Pet Shop Boys no longer fit the game-show-and-rap-video dominated MTV schedule, although their videos continued to be played extensively on Euro-MTV.
Left to my own devices features more of the signature obscure-intellectual lyrics that Neil Tennant has been noted for:
I was faced by a choice at a difficult age,
would I write a book, or should I take to the stage,
but in the back of my head, I heard distant feet
Che Guevara and Debussy to a disco beat.
Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
"Introspective" is a one-of-a-kind release from Pet Shop Boys. Is it an EP? A remix album? Or is it a new studio recording? It is all these things and more. The album contains remixes of previously released material, newly recorded songs, and a couple covers to boot. Although "Introspective" is a grab-bag of an album, it's by no means a throwaway record. "Left to My Own Devices" is a stomping disco number, replete with a full orchestra and Neil Tennant's spoken vocals. "I Want a Dog" is a funked-up remix of the original b-side, while we're treated to a housed version of their No. 1 "Always On My Mind." In addition, there's "I'm Not Scared," which Patsy Kensit would later record, and they do a decent cover of Sterling Void's "It's Alright." Though the record is only 6 tracks long, "Introspective" is a triumph of quality over quantity, and at the time, it was the most disco-centric release of their catalogue. If "Very" or "Behaviour" is the duo's best album, then "Introspective" ranks a close second.
More interesting, still, is the second disc, which has rare remixes, demo versions, and songs they originally recorded for Dusty Springfield and Liza Minnelli. The song of note is "I Get Excited (You Get Excited Too)" which was a b-side to the single "Heart" but is strong enough to be released as a single.
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Format: Audio CD
The PSB recently remastered and re-issued their first six albums. "Introspective" has always been my favorite CD by them and I was only too happy to but it again to get all the extras. Disc 1 is the original CD remastered. It sounds great and these dance tracks now thump with extra power. My all-time favorite PSB song is included, Left to My Own Devices, which accomplishes their goal of putting "Debussy to a disco beat."
Disc 2 contains various remixes and b-sides from the era (1988-1989). It has several versions of Domino Dancing, including the lovely, stripped-down "alternative version" and the demo version which is beautiful in its own right, but a mere skeleton of the song it would eventually become. They also include two songs that the wrote and produced for others - Liza Minelli (So Sorry, I Said) and Dusty Springfield (Nothing Has Been Proved, which was inspired by the Profumo scandal).
Best of all is the extras that have been released with this re-issue. The 36-page booklet has tons of pictures and all song lyrics. Plus, the PSB comment on the entire CD and each song. For example, they reveal that "Losing My Mind" was their attempt at doing a ZZ Top type song! Brilliant!
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