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The Introvert Advantage: How Quiet People Can Thrive in an Extrovert World Paperback – Feb 1 2002

4.3 out of 5 stars 65 customer reviews

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Frequently Bought Together

  • The Introvert Advantage: How Quiet People Can Thrive in an Extrovert World
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  • Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking
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  • The Highly Sensitive Person
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Workman Publishing Company (Feb. 1 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0761123695
  • ISBN-13: 978-0761123699
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.9 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 399 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 65 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #16,309 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

“Tamara Marston’s narration makes the material relatable and informative. . . . [She] is able to identify with her audience, making her reading all the more effective and intimate. The result is a helpful, enlightening, and entertaining listen.”
      —Publishers Weekly

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Marti Olsen Laney, Psy.D., is a researcher, educator, author, and psychotherapist. One of America’s foremost authorities on introversion, she speaks and leads workshops on the topic in the United States and Canada. She and her extroverted husband have two grown daughters and four grandchildren. They live in Portland, Oregon.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
"Introverts are like a rechargeable battery. They need to stop expending energy and rest in order to recharge. Extroverts are like solar panels that need the sun to recharge. Extroverts need to be out and about to refuel." ~Marti Olsen Laney
Imagine feeling alone in a crowd, preferring a quiet corner to the limelight and feeling overwhelmed by phones, parties and office meetings. Do people often think you are shy, aloof or antisocial? If you are an introvert, you are going to completely relate to a variety of comments that are like fireworks going off in recognition of truth. Introverts can hide their talents and only show them in certain situations.
Through reading this wonderful and often humorous book, you will be assured that nothing is wrong with you. In fact, there is a connection between Introversion and Intelligence.
What is fascinating is how Marti Olsen Laney explains how introverts create energy in the opposite way extroverts do. I'm often drained of all energy after being with people for extended periods of time, but being with a book can set me on fire with creativity and energy. I can handle small groups and connecting with familiar faces can actually energize me, but after three hours, I want to find a more peaceful setting.
This book helped me understand why I have deeper thoughts when I'm by myself than in a group setting. People seem to not know who I am in the "real-world," but online, I have found a place to show my true self. This is apparently because introverts are more comfortable with writing than speaking in public.
Are You an Introvert?
Are you detail oriented yet details in public spaces overwhelm you?
Do you prefer small parties with intimate friends?
Do you avoid crowds?
Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
I'm a college student that recently went away to school and it wasn't too long before I started getting cranky and depressed. Being an intovert my whole life, i figured that throwing myself into a social situation would increase my ability to like being social, but all it ever seemed to do was annoy me and make me feel like a failure because i hadn't adapted to all of my extroverted peers. I started reading this book one day when I escaped to the bookstore as a way to get away from campus. I usually don't appreciate any self help books, because they tend to make me feel worse about myself. But this book was quite different. The author has a way of empathizing with the reader and explained to me things about myself that I never would have suspected. The reviews on here that criticize the book for not being complete enough, should realize that it was probably not intended for that purpose. The book does give some quidelines however in helping the introvert understand their situation better. Overall, it gives the introvert hope and reasons to finally accept who they are, because it is difficult to be an introvert in an extroverted world.
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Format: Paperback
Some illuminating tidbits here and there, but too often the book lacks hard data. The author makes broad extrapolations from personal or anecdotal experience and then presumes that all introverts are like her or the people she interviewed (many of whom I suspect to be her psychotherapy clients, which would automatically skew her "data.") She rarely cites specific scientific studies to back up what she's saying (although many studies exist on the topic)and thus the reader is left with gnawing doubts about what's a personal viewpoint and what's scientific fact. She goes on endlessly, for example, about introverts' "low energy" with virtually no national survey cited to prove that such a startling assertion is based on reality. She goes on about her own low energy so much that one begins to suspect that what she herself may be suffering isn't introversion but mild depression. Too, she tries noticeably hard to distance herself from "shyness," insisting again and again (she doth protest far too often) that she is not, when again and again she describes bouts of social anxiety whenever in large groups of people. Although she tries to tease out introversion from shyness, one powerful study she does finally present (and with an illustration no less)shows that the introvert processes socializing through a neural fear center much more often than do extroverts. Although she tries to make a case that the introvert's thinking process is slower because it is more complex, in fact it appears to merely go through inhibitory pathways that the extrovert's brain often skips.Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
I agree with those reviewers who complained that the author too often confuses introversion with shyness or even various types of social phobia.
I am an introvert among introverts and repeatedly score as far into introversion as one can get on the MBTI and other scales, so I know whereof I speak.
Contrary to what Marti Olsen Laney says, we introverts don't want extroverts to ask us for our opinions. In most situations, we prefer to listen and analyze, but when we have something to say, we will pontificate on it ad nauseum, which is why most academics, scientists and researchers are introverts.
We also don't prefer to socialize in small groups. We actually like being in large groups because then we are not forced to speak when we'd rather observe and listen. (We can get happily lost in a crowd.)
And God save us from those well-meaning souls who feel they are doing us introverts a favor by "drawing [us] out."
We prefer formality and value our privacy. We'll thank you to respect that.
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