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Jack the Bodiless

4.3 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Random House Value Publishing (April 11 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0517116448
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517116449
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 16.8 x 24.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 522 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,870,895 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

May's newest series, following from her two Intervention titles, begins by combining galactic-scale intrigue with the smaller but no less turbulent affairs of the powerful Remillard family. In the mid-21st century, earth's humanity, led by the mentally gifted Remillards, is awaiting acceptance into the vast Galactic Milieu, a political and telepathic alliance of alien races. But some beings on earth, even some among the Remillard clan, are wary of the aliens. At this delicate juncture, Teresa, wife of clan leader Paul Remillard, conceives a child who promises to be the most powerful mental talent ever, but whose genetic defects condemn him to death under Milieu law. Meanwhile, a demonic force calling itself Fury has begun to kill off Remillards and others with "metapsychic" powers, creating a chaos that threatens to delay humanity's admission to the Milieu. The plot is engaging and May's prose adequate to it, but the story is marred by its unbroken focus on elites, with no attention paid to ordinary people, and by its aliens, who seem too much like humans. Literary Guild's Science Fiction Book Club selection.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal

As a consortium of five alien races stands ready to accept Earth as a full partner in the Galactic Milieu, the birth of a very special child heralds a new stage in human evolution. As in Intervention and "The Saga of Pliocene Exile" series, May combines a compelling vision of humanity's future with the drama and political intrigue surrounding the Remillard family, whose metapsychic powers and personal ambitions shape the destiny of the world. Familiarity with the earlier books is helpful in unraveling the complex relationships in this ambitious trilogy opener; nevertheless, the author's imagination and careful choreography make this title a necessary purchase for most sf collections. Highly recommended. Science Fiction Book Club main selection.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Jack the Bodiless is the first book in the Galactic Milieu Trilogy. This book and the rest of this trilogy should be read after reading the other related series, the Intervention books (Surveillance and The Metaconcert) and The Saga of The Pliocene Exile (The Many Colored Land, The Golden Torc, The Nonborn King, The Adversary). Those two series can be read in any order, but I would recommend perusing first the Saga and then Intervention. Those two series will give you a significant grounding in the characters and setting you encounter in the Galactic Milieu trilogy.
I tried to read this book after reading the Intervention series and it was too jarring a transition for me at the time. So I put the book away for a few years and then came back later after having read the Saga of The Pliocene Exile and found this series much more comprehensible and absorbing. Once I came back to his series I read all three books in about a weeks time.
The Galactic Milieu trilogy is set in the not too distant future where earth has been drawn by spacefaring aliens into a grand design of interstellar fellowship. The primary plot device of the series is the grand mental powers recently developed by humanity and the growth of the significant power wielded in this regard by the Remillard family.
The story (and in fact the whole Galactic Milieu trilogy) is told as a recollection of Rogi Remillard a familiar character to those who read the Intervention books. Many times his is the voice telling the story and at other times we transition to the individuals themselves to see from their perspective.
This book is mainly about the events that form around the time frame encompassing the gestation, birth and early life of Jack the Bodiless.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Jack the Bodiless is the first book in the Galactic Milieu Trilogy. This book and the rest of this trilogy should be read after reading the other related series, the Intervention books (Surveillance and The Metaconcert) and The Saga of The Pliocene Exile (The Many Colored Land, The Golden Torc, The Nonborn King, The Adversary). Those two series can be read in any order, but I would recommend perusing first the Saga and then Intervention. Those two series will give you a significant grounding in the characters and setting you encounter in the Galactic Milieu trilogy.
I tried to read this book after reading the Intervention series and it was too jarring a transition for me at the time. So I put the book away for a few years and then came back later after having read the Saga of The Pliocene Exile and found this series much more comprehensible and absorbing. Once I came back to his series I read all three books in about a weeks time.
The story (and in fact the whole Galactic Milieu trilogy) is told as a recollection of Rogi Remillard a familiar character to those who read the Intervention books. Many times his is the voice telling the story and at other times we transition to the individuals themselves to see from their perspective.
This book is mainly about the events that form around the time frame encompassing the gestation, birth and early life of Jack the Bodiless. These events include the early life of Marc Remillard and the threat to the Remillard family caused by the Fury and Hydra entities. I found the Remillard family interaction and characters created in the series to be very compelling overall.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Next to Intervention this is May at her best. The scope of the book is incredible. Character development is solid with enigmatic characters whom manage to aquire heroic stature whilst having devistatingly flawed characters. This is the future in impressionist form. We have broad brushstrokes and you will, outside of the boys own adventure, have to evaluate the morality of this world on your own. May meerly describes the scene and doesn't chose to comment one way or another. As in the Saga the obscure use of technology in entirely plausable ways make this universe *real*. Technology not of a solely violent/macho nature but used in the sunday suppliment useless gadget of the week way. Like having a women design kitchen appliances the resultant differences from "masculine" views of technology are profound and practical. No rail guns or mass drivers here boys... sorry! The whole thing (tied in with Saga) is of an order of scale of the finished tolkein works IMO. The scope of what occurs is titanic. The foces at work throughout the series are glacial. There are periods where nothing *appears* to be happening but the landscape has changed dramaticly when the ice thaws! Things have happened in this series over epochs and we don't have the sudden violent release found in other modern fiction. May has written of the sculpting of a race and the forces at work as as great as those that form mountains. Beware... the last book is a real let down compared to the rest of the work. *shrug* But then you can't have everything... where would you keep it all?
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