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Jake West - The Keeper of the Stones: US Edit (The Jake West Trilogy Book 1) by [Webb, M. J.]
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Jake West - The Keeper of the Stones: US Edit (The Jake West Trilogy Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product Description

Product Description

When fifteen year old Jake West and his best friend, Ben Brooker, help Jake's grandfather clear his attic of the junk he's collected from his years of travelling, the boys discover an old chest containing a beautifully carved wooden box. The box contains a set of five mysterious stones and when they erupt to emit a bright beam of light, it sparks an epic journey which will lead Jake into a dangerous world and to the discovery of some strange family secrets. The future of our world and countless others now lies in the hands of a fifteen year old boy. If he can't protect the stones.....?
Author's note ; This book is the first in a trilogy I penned for my children so it is aimed at readers from twelve and over. Information in book 1 is needed for books 2 and 3.

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 999 KB
  • Print Length: 288 pages
  • Publisher: M J Webb; 1 edition (Aug. 6 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005GA9AQ4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,017,777 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Kindle Edition
Jake and Ben weren't supposed to be snooping through Jakes's grandfather's attic. But of course, this doesn't stop two young teenagers. They were only looking for adventure in an otherwise tedious existence, after all. As the old adage says, be careful what you wish for. Jake and Ben get more than they bargained for when they discover a seemingly mundane wooden box containing stones. Stones that begin to glow and open a door to a place beyond even their young imaginations.

What makes a warrior? A strong arm and skill with a weapon is helpful. But none of these matter if one doesn't posses a warrior's heart. Jake and Ben find themselves thrust into the midst of a war; fighting for a country not their own. Yet they soon discover what they are made of and that courage and integrity are the real weapons in a fight.

My favorite element to The Keeper of the Stones is the characters. The author managed to create a story filled with many different players. Whether good or bad, they are vibrant and real; it's easy to love some and despise others. But most importantly, our heroes grow throughout the story and the reader follows right along with them.

Overall, Webb created a wonderful tale. The dialogue ranges from humorous to poignant. The plot is a rollercoaster ride of emotional moments and raging battles. It is filled with adventure, magic and bonded together with the themes of honour, courage and doing what is right. It is a story for all ages and I recommend it to everyone.
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By Jonel TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Jan. 30 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
The descriptions in this novel are clear and to the point. They also fit with the writing style. There is no disconnect in the writing between the conversations, narrative, and descriptive sections. Also, the author uses the correct terms when fitting and explains what needs explaining. My biggest issue with the descriptions was that, although you learn a great deal about the lay of the land, you never really learn what it looks like. Throughout the novel as a whole there is a flow that leads the reader from one point to the next very smoothly. The tone of the story changes based on the event at hand, but it never becomes disjointed.

All of the characters are unique, personable, and well developed. I enjoyed that the heroes comically go about fulfilling their quest. The protagonist's plight puts coming of age in a whole new light, or perhaps light show would be a better description. You also cannot help but feel a little sorry for Ben who is basically just along for the ride. The differing speech patterns used for characters really helps to distinguish who is talking without a lot of "he said, she said" moments.

This novel was the perfect setup for the series. There is just enough background information that you know what's going on. You learn enough about the future to want to find out what happens, but not so much that you don't need to come back for more. It's the perfect balance. I also quite enjoy the fact that the reader learns why there is a Keeper in the first place. There are no large holes in the history of the story.

All in all, this is a very fun novel. It was very action packed with everyone always doing something, and not everyone always doing the same time. However, who did what, when, and how remained clear throughout the entire novel.
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Format: Hardcover
It should have been a relaxing day of rummaging through his Grandfathers attic and Jake was enjoying himself...at first. Jake and his best friend, Ben, found some collectibles, a few antiques and some odds and ends, but nothing of real value until Ben spotted something that resembled a music box. Curious about what it contained, they open the box and BOOM! The rest as they say, is history...

JAKE WEST: The Keeper of the Stones is the first book in an action-packed, adventure-filled, character-driven YA Fantasy series that should be on the New York Times Bestsellers list. This is not an idle boast; one simply has to read the book to find out how very right we are. This story reads like a big screen movie and focuses on themes of loyalty, trust, friendship and camaraderie and their polar opposites. Every character is skillfully written and with great depth; they each have their own distinct personality and unique character traits. The story should be equally enjoyable for both genders and it is also highly recommended for adult fantasy. The story does contain a fair amount or violence and some blood/gore, but it is well-written, adds depth to the story and brings the battle and action scenes to life. The book is beautifully packaged as a perfect paperback or a hard cover edition, with three, high quality, b&w, maps that are included inside the front cover. Mark our words; M.J. WEBB is an author to watch and readers will be clamoring for the next book in the series! Very highly recommended. For YA and adult fantasy readers who are searching for a brand-new, superb fantasy series to get into, look no further...

Copyright 2011 © Nurture Your BOOKS --- Bobbie Crawford-McCoy
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Format: Kindle Edition
First in a trilogy, 'Jake West - The Keeper of the Stones' is the type of boyhood adventure tale that will make a reader out of any child, teenager, or young adult. It's the type of page-turning novel that aspires one not only to read, but also to write. It's a modern day Huckleberry Finn with writing that grips like C.S. Lewis and an imagination that possesses like Tolkien.

Fifteen-year-old Jake West and his buddy Ben discover a box of five stones in his grandfather attic which sets them on a daring path. These precious stones bring with them great responsibility and great peril. Jake and Ben must become warriors in a fight to defend all that is good. Always, they must protect the stones from those who covet them for evil purposes. In keeping with the earthy nature of the story, M.J. Webb paints a vivid world that is both mortal and fantasy. As with all great literature, there are life lessons strewn throughout.

This is a fantastic start to a series. The characters are well-developed (especially Jake) and the storyline leaves you wanting more, and more, and more. An incredible page-turner that will ripen the imagination of any child, it’s a must-read for all fantasy lovers.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9d9e9378) out of 5 stars 53 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9fac4078) out of 5 stars Lord of the Rings for the next generation Nov. 8 2011
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is the first installment of an epic fantasy tale that vibrates with the influences of Tolkien whilst developing its own identity, characters and worlds. The story sucks you in from the start as you explore Harry's attic with Jake, his grandson, and his best friend Ben where they discover an ancient box that contains five powerful stones, which, being the curious teenagers they are, they open and trigger a series of events that take them and you on an incredible journey to another world and brings that other world to our own.

Webb has created a world with just enough echoes of Middle Earth to pay homage to the origins of this genre and keep the reader in mildly familiar territory and enough originality and unique attributes to keep you guessing. The races found in this other world are vivd in their appearances and cultures with characters that suit each perfectly. Jake and Ben's relationship is brilliantly balanced and written with a familiarity that all readers will be able to connect with (unless you were raised in complete isolation, but even then you should still enjoy it) and it adds a certain lightness and realism to the story that will bring a smile to your face even in the most dire circumstances (and, I should warn you, there are one or two).

My only minor (and very personal) gripe is the inner monologues that appear every so often, which came across more detailed than necessary, although it could just be that I speak to myself in a abnormally simplistic manner. This is only a small gripe and one that doesn't detract from the superb story and vivid worlds that Webb has created. Can't wait to get stuck into the next installment.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d927030) out of 5 stars Premise had all the potential... Aug. 3 2013
By Shelby Lee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I was given this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you Mr. Webb for offering up your story.

Jake West and his best friend Ben have all the enthusiasm and curiosity of any 15 year old boy. One day while digging around in Jake's grandfather's attic Ben stumbles over a strange box buried in an old war trunk. Showing it off to Jake the boys are puzzled as to how to open it. It looks to be an impossible task until Jake passes his hand over the unique design on the top. Suddenly the box begins to open revealing four colored stones surrounding a fifth stone. As the stones begin to glow the center stone rises and suddenly a beam of bright white light shoots from the crystal and out the window into the sky with a loud boom.

From the garden Jake's grandfather Harry hears the boom and stares in horror at the beam. As terror grips him he runs to the attic and slams shut the box. He screams at the boys that they have no idea what they've done, what evil and horrors they've brought upon themselves. For that box opens a path to another world, one where evil abounds, an evil that will stop at nothing to gain control of the box.

As Harry calms down he explains to Jake about his legacy; his destiny as a Keeper of the Stones. Harry never wanted this life for his grandson, and had hoped after his last confrontation with those from Rhuddan that Jake would never have to know. During his last battle Harry made it appear as if himself and the box were destroyed. For almost 20 years he's been able to live in peace, but now that the box has been opened those who would wish to claim it for their own will know that it still exists.

As Harry's grandson, Jake has the blood legacy to be the next Keeper. There is a war going on in Rhuddan between two brothers, one an evil warlock and the other the rightful king of the land. The box is extremely powerful and as Keeper it will imbue Jake with powers beyond his imagination. Powers that could help those in need or hurt them if it fell into the wrong hands.

When enemy soldiers appear Jake and Ben are forced to flee for their lives through the beam of light from the box. In an unfamiliar land, the two find themselves unwittingly thrust into a battle for the fate of a world. Bound and determined to help the dethroned king rebuild his rebel army and rescue an impoverished land from an evil tyrants' rule the two boys have a lot to discover about themselves, and a world full of magic.

Sounds like the great start to a wonderful story of magic and adventure. Unfortunately the writing does not live up to the beauty of the pitch. From the first page the writer's style began to bug me. Now, while I may have adapted to the boys use of a strong British dialect over time, if it had remained consistent, it doesn't. As an American I'm not sure what dialect the author was originally going for, but the phonetic misspellings of words just bothered me when shortly there after all traces of the dialect were gone. Mr. Webb does try to reintroduce it at times throughout the novel, but there is no consistency to when or how it is used. The boys themselves don't always use it in their conversations, even with each other.
I probably wouldn't even have noticed this derivation if it wasn't for the fact that Mr. Webb introduces the idea the Rhuddan people have their own language. He writes entire spells in an ancient version of this language that for all intents and purposes are gibberish to an English speaker reading them. He introduces terminology specific to this world, "They were all steadfastly loyal to their King and, led brilliantly by their maverick Gerada (the Ruddite word for General), Knesh Corian." Which, ignoring the strange use of a parenthetical when phrasing such as `The were all steadfastly loyal to their King and, led brilliantly by their maverick Gerada Knesh Corian, the Ruddite general'gives the same meaning, continues the theme that there is another language in play here. Yet, upon Jake and Ben's arrival both sides understand each other perfectly indicating a full understanding of the English language. And while at times different characters from Rhuddan might question a colloquialism used by either Jake or Ben, neither of the boys are ever thrown by terminology used by their new friends in Rhuddan. The author never gives us any explanation for how this is possible. I'm fully accepting of the idea that this magic box gives Jake special powers and can imbue him with an understanding/use of this ancient language later in the book, but that doesn't explain how they all can understand each other to start off, nor does it explain how Ben understands anything at all. He has no connection to the box, so even if it magically gave Jake the entirety of this new language to speak and understand, Ben would have no such help.

Language aside, the author has done nothing to endear these characters to me. Most of the book is told from what feels like a lecturing point of view. Take for example Harry's explanation to his grandson and Ben about the box's history and Jake's new role. In seven pages we have maybe ten minor responses from the boys. At one point during his rant Harry lights into the boys saying, "I know you like to laugh at things when you can, and that's great...But, with these stones comes great responsibility. Promise me you'll take this seriously, Jake?" Yet, nowhere in the previous four paragraphs have we seen any reaction from the boys other than one brief line claiming Harry could see the fear growing in their eyes. If that's the case than why bring up the laughing? Either the boys are currently laughing and need to be brought back to the gravity of the situation or they're the scared boys of the previous description. Everything I've read, from the few times I'm told the boys' perspective, has them taking things seriously.

Mr. Webb manages to go on for paragraphs at times about seemingly inconsequential things. I get page long treaties on the different types of warriors in King Vantrax's army, full of details about the strengths and weakness' of each one, all of which could be condensed to one or two lines each and I'd have gotten the key point that ultimately mattered. Of all of it, the only part I remember, is that the serpent type warrior, while having a very tough skin, has a susceptible underbelly. All of this extra information ultimately does nothing but bore me, as the thing I lose is what these characters are feeling! At times it's even difficult to delineate what a character "thinks" vs what they actually say out loud. Mr. Webb will often in the middle of a conversation have a character think something marking it with `...' instead of with "..." and using the word thought instead of said.

When I should be cheering and rooting for my characters instead I'm left with a great feeling of antipathy. Let's take them all individually.

Harry: He's supposed to be this loving grandfather, except as previously stated he does nothing but lecture Jake in the short time we see him. While I understand his reason for trying to hide the box, having been through all of this before I want to see him cheering his grandson on. I want him to be scared for his grandson sure, but I want him trying in the little time he has to explain helping, not lecturing.

King Vantrax: For this all-powerful evil warlock king, Vantrax comes across as a supremely whiny baby. Everything is all screaming tantrums and pounding things. Sure, he zaps a few people to dust, but for being the current winner of this war he knows nothing about strategy or leading an army. I would have said the character was a manic-depressive reading this. One minute he's in a towering rage and the next he's accepting some bland excuse as a reason to not kill someone whose head he almost ripped off. Nowhere, in any description, did I see the evil genius who could have pulled off this coup.

Sawdon: If all the random rarrr's and growls and such that pepper this writing aren't annoying enough Sawdon has nothing interesting about his character. He's all "Hulk smash!" without the charm of Bruce Banner. There is no intelligent plotting or scheming to make up for his witless leader. And to believe that someone who has failed this often and miserably has managed to basically win a war, I find difficult to believe.

King Artrex: As the rightful king of this land, I want to see someone who deserves that title. Instead I'm given a king who's lost all hope, is barely able to think the battle is worth fighting anymore. Yet, his people still follow him, after decades? This is a man, who tells us that all of his victories are because of his fabulous Gerada Knesh Corian. But, when this man tells him that they should move their camp because they've been in one place too long and King Vantrax could spy them out, he ignores him. I'm not even given a strong relationship with his daughter Princess Zephany to grasp onto. She's been trained by Knesh, he has the more fatherly relationship with her. When thinks do start to turn around and King Artrex is once again hopeful and a rightful leader, his relationship with his daughter is fixed in a paragraph and she just goes along with it. All contention is gone and they're wonderful and have a great relationship.

Princess Zephany: Here's the character I expected to love. She's been trained to fight, to lead, to be the fearless warrior. Yet, she's vulnerable wanting her father's love and attention. Instead as soon as our hero arrives and is discovered to be the Keeper she passes over all control and thought to him. Immediately believing he's the answer to their prayers. I loved her skepticism and strength when she first meets the boys. Taking them back to her father as prisoners. I don't want to watch her give all that up, and to quickly become the only slight failure in a string of successes. Hers is the only raid that goes even a little wrong. She immediately forgives her father, follows after Jake like a puppy, and doesn't question a thing. I don't mind her being intrigued by Jake and starting to fall for him, but such quick capitulation is unworthy of the character she could be.

Knesh/Verastus: Both these characters were the least offensive to me. They suited their purpose within the story line well and are good support characters for both Ben and Jake. Knesh arc was sad, while fitting, and I would normally be curious to see where Verastus' story takes him.

Onto our two main boys, Jake and Ben. Before I get into the boys individually I want to say one thing about the two of them. For two normal boys from Earth, they certainly take all these strange fur and scale covered creatures on Rhuddan in stride. Never once blinking at the strangeness of it all. Nope this is just another day for them, a walk in the park.

Jake: He's too perfect. I want to see my hero struggle, to overcome things, to learn. Instead with Jake I'm given a hero that goes from being a 15 year old boy one minute, to a 30 year old man the next. He doesn't have to work for anything. I'm fine with the box imbuing him with magical powers, with suddenly having the ability to fight at an elite level, to understand languages. But to just as quickly be this amazing strategist, leader, and all out genius in a world where he doesn't know the rules is too much. To have every person he comes into contact with immediately jump to follow his every thought is beyond ridiculous. I want to see a hero who's fallible; someone who is gifted with great power, but is learning as he goes. Take a character like Percy Jackson from Rick Riordan's series "Percy Jackson and the Olympians." Percy is the son of a god and suddenly finds himself with all these incredible powers, but he still a 15 year old boy. He stumbles and makes mistakes and isn't always sure of himself. He grows as he learns and we love him for it. Jake has nothing to learn. He takes his new powers as his due and doesn't question why everything works out for him. It's destiny, he's special. That's not good enough for me.

Ben: By far my favorite character. Ben at least is given a little bit of development and a little bit of real human emotion. He's scared at times and chooses to overcome it and be brave. He's loyal and would do anything for his friend. He's not perfect, he doesn't always do things right, but he's going to try. Even his comedy is welcome, lightening the mood. Ben is the breath of fresh air in this book. He's the hero I wish Jake was. He's fallible. He's honest. He's loyal and true. But then he's given a few abilities that are unbelievable. I've done sword fighting. You don't pick up a sword and immediately be able to kill someone, even with the element of surprise. I wouldn't have minded his battle at the end if anywhere in the book he'd been attempting to learn. He spent all this time with Knesh as a mentor, with the army, if he'd been attempting to train with them I would have loved his fight at the end. He still wouldn't have had to be great, but there'd be some believability to him fighting trained soldiers. Altogether he's the only character that made this book even a little bearable.

In the end the authors writing never matches the potential for this book. I love the premise and the story is there. The events as they unfold work. Thus why this book gets 2 stars from me. It's not that there are a ton of grammatical errors there either. It's just that the writing itself is just plain BAD. I can't even trust my narrator. Often I'm told on one page that a character has no abilities with a sword or something and on the next that same character is holding their own in a fight with trained soldiers. There are so many redundant paragraphs and so much repeated information that the story is bogged down. It doesn't move along and I struggled to get through to the end.

The illogical parts of this book overwhelm the believable. Something as simple as the fact that apparently in a county that you can cross in less than a day on foot/horseback you can hide an entire army for decades. Time and distance are not dealt with in a believable manner and to add that on top of a perfect hero just puts me off. There's no reason to read further.

In the blurb I was given for this book the author was compared to other young adult/fantasy giants like C.S. Lewis, J.R.R Tolkien, and J.K. Rowling. While he may share the same use of initials, M.J. Webb doesn't even come close to their abilities with the written word. The dexterity and incredible ability those authors have to bring their world to life for the reader, to make you love and care about their characters, is sadly lacking in this novel. As much as I like knowing the end to a story I doubt I will read the rest of this series.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9dddbeac) out of 5 stars Great adventure! June 11 2014
By MacQueen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
The Keeper of the Stones had me hooked from the beginning. I grew up reading books like the Lord of the Rings and pretty much everything David Eddings has ever written, so It's safe to say that there are a few things that a book must
have for me to stay in it.
Strong Characters- check. I didn't like some of the dialogue but then I reminded myself that they are 15 and it made a lot more sense to me. The boys are brave and also provide some light moments when the story is getting dark. I enjoyed them.
I loved the kindly grandfather with the secret. That is the type of character that every fantasy novel needs. I also liked
the two kings and that whole dynamic.
Good setting- check. I loved that the author did not just create a new world. Parts of the story take place in our world and it
provides a really interesting contrast and a dose of reality when you need it.
Fun-check. When I read a book, I like to feel like the author had fun writing their story. Their fun usually translates into reader fun. The stories tend to be dark and serious, which is okay most of the time. I love that this book is punched up with hilarity and laughter. That's what endears a story to me. No character is ever appealing to me unless I like them as people. I need to want to hang out with them.

The only real critique I'll give is that I didn't always like the writing style. I didn't feel like the same style was used throughout the entire book. It was almost as if more than one person wrote the book. I'm always a big proponent of story over writing, though. I believe that if the story is good
enough, the reader will keep reading regardless of anything else.
I think this book will capture the minds of the teenagers it
targets and I'd reccommend it.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d8b9b34) out of 5 stars The Keeper of the Stones Jan. 30 2013
By Jonel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The descriptions in this novel are clear and to the point. They also fit with the writing style. There is no disconnect in the writing between the conversations, narrative, and descriptive sections. Also, the author uses the correct terms when fitting and explains what needs explaining. My biggest issue with the descriptions was that, although you learn a great deal about the lay of the land, you never really learn what it looks like. Throughout the novel as a whole there is a flow that leads the reader from one point to the next very smoothly. The tone of the story changes based on the event at hand, but it never becomes disjointed.

All of the characters are unique, personable, and well developed. I enjoyed that the heroes comically go about fulfilling their quest. The protagonist's plight puts coming of age in a whole new light, or perhaps light show would be a better description. You also cannot help but feel a little sorry for Ben who is basically just along for the ride. The differing speech patterns used for characters really helps to distinguish who is talking without a lot of "he said, she said" moments.

This novel was the perfect setup for the series. There is just enough background information that you know what's going on. You learn enough about the future to want to find out what happens, but not so much that you don't need to come back for more. It's the perfect balance. I also quite enjoy the fact that the reader learns why there is a Keeper in the first place. There are no large holes in the history of the story.

All in all, this is a very fun novel. It was very action packed with everyone always doing something, and not everyone always doing the same time. However, who did what, when, and how remained clear throughout the entire novel.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9dcfef9c) out of 5 stars Entertaining YA Book Jan. 15 2013
By the_goddess_isis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Keeper of the Stones, Book One
Pg. 40 - paragraph 2 (2nd full paraphrase), beginning with "Keeper!" - several statements end with ? marks rather than periods or ! points.
Too many uses of "Raarr" "Rarr" & "Rarrt"- they aren't pirates.
Pg 54 - 2nd to last paragraph, spoken statement shouldn't end in a ? mark.
Pg 64 - middle of page Jake and Ben. . . "Well, my new mucka," [when was this word used earlier?]
Pg 105 - 2nd to last line, should it end in a ? mark? Doesn't read as well that way.
Pg 124 - 3rd pgraph from bottom "You will have known him as, the Keeper."
Ch. 33, pg. 170 - end of 1st paragraph has an unnecessary comma before "was severe."
Pg 183 - 2nd to last pgraph, last sentence "But, to fight now, would be stupid!" -- no need for either comma, particularly when you take the whole piece into account.

This is an entertaining book that will certainly appeal more to the masculine gender than the feminine, at this point. That's not to say this won't change in later Books, especially since there is already a hint of a romance on the horizon.

Jake & Ben, 15 year old boys from the UK, are best friends. They begin what they think will be an interesting day going through Jake's granddad Harry's attic to help clean it out. Of course they aren't interested in the cleaning, just in all the things just waiting to be discovered, as they've never been allowed into Harry's attic before. Ben quickly discovers an old trunk full of war memorabilia of Harry's, including a fairly small wooden box. The trick is, he can't open the box no matter what he tries. He calls Jake over to show it to him. As Jake reaches for it their lives change forever . . .

Harry, working outside in his garden, witnessed what happened up in the attic and quickly realizes just what the event means. He runs for the boys, knowing time is limited and he must tell them everything. Harry tells the two teens a fantastical story, but runs out of time, and things end with Harry at home and Jake & Ben off on the adventure of their life.

**MINOR SPOILER Next Paragraph**

It turns out Jake comes from a long line of Keepers, as their family was chosen to be the protectors of a box of sacred, magical stones. These stones are only found in one place in the universe, Rhuaddan, which exists in an alternate plane to Earth. Both boys arrive in Rhuaddan totally unprepared, but then as far as everyone knows it is their only choice - both if they want to live and if Jake is to protect the sacred stones. From this point on the boys have adventures together and separately - the kind of adventures most teenage boys dream about, if only in the abstract; sword fights, traveling foreign lands, meeting pretty girls, and fighting the good fight.

Their friendship only grows stronger as they journey through this strange land together, making many new friends as well as many powerful enemies. But suddenly something happens that changes the game, so much so that the ending of Book One may come as a huge surprise. However it is crystal clear that their adventure is far from finished.

On to Book Two to learn the consequences of their choices and actions at the end of Book One. Will good prevail and 'save the day,' or is all hope lost?