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Kensington K72327US SlimBlade Trackball

4.2 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

List Price: CDN$ 164.39
Price: CDN$ 96.00 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
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31 new from CDN$ 94.99 10 used from CDN$ 86.40
  • Multi-function ball lets you easily navigate through your music, pictures and documents using media or document view mode
  • Keep an eye on which application you are in and which function is being performed with the heads-up display on your monitor
  • With its low-profile shape, youll be able to use it comfortably for hours on end
  • The sleek stationary design saves your desk space
  • Gain fingertip access to image and media controls
Microsoft PCA


Frequently Bought Together

  • Kensington K72327US SlimBlade Trackball
  • +
  • Logitech M570  Wireless Trackball
Total price: CDN$ 142.00
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Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 12.7 x 8.9 cm ; 318 g
  • Shipping Weight: 422 g
  • Item model number: K72327EU
  • ASIN: B001MTE32Y
  • Date first available at Amazon.ca: April 2 2009
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #17,741 in Electronics (See Top 100 in Electronics)
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Product Description

Kensington SlimBlade Wired Media Trackball
Simply twist the multi-function ball for fast and precise click free scrolling.
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SlimBlade Wired Media Trackball

Comfort and productivity are at your fingertips with the Kensington SlimBlade Trackball. The slim, low-profile, ambidextrous design provides all-day comfort while the advanced dual laser sensors and large ball deliver exceptional precision. For even greater productivity, the four programmable buttons can be set to the functions or keyboard shortcuts you use most with our TrackballWorks software.


Sleek, comfortable ambidextrous design

The slim, low-profile shape works equally well for either right-handed or left-handed users while taking up less desk space than needed to operate a mouse. Provides more comfort during extended use through reduced arm and wrist movement.

Large ball and patented 3D Scrolling Technology

Dual lasers provide highly accurate and responsive X and Y axis scrolling, plus the large ball makes it easy to precisely navigate anywhere on the screen. Spin the ball to smoothly scroll pages up and down. There’s no need to move your fingers away from the ball, which reduces hand and wrist movement.

Plug & play operation

Get clicking and scrolling quickly with fast, reliable and intuitive installation through the wired USB connection.

TrackballWorks 2.0 Software

Provides an even more personalized experience, giving you the ability to assign a wide variety of program functions to each of your buttons as well as control the pointer speed and scrolling.

Universal acceptance

Compatible with both PC and Mac computers.


From the Manufacturer



Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Verified Purchase
Massive and uncomfortable.

My use-case is to put it beneath my keyboard to use with my thumbs without having to lift my hands unless necessary. I had tried trackpads, but have never been happy with the experience (a Lenovo nipple is still my ideal mouse, but is unfortunately not available on an ergonomic keyboard.

It was plug-and-play and I was able to easily define the buttons using xinput on Debian 8 (so that the top buttons were the primary mouse buttons). Unfortunately the ball is unwieldy and you must use your fingertips. Because of the positioning, I had it close to my chest which was extremely uncomfortable in that position; you really need to use it with an outstretched arm to save your wrists.

Beyond that, it worked, arrive quickly (with excessive packaging), the rotational scrolling is really cool and the ball was super smooth. Probably great if you use it in normal mouse position.

I swithed to the Logitech Marble and it works perfectly for my use-case.
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Verified Purchase
I don't understand how this is the gold standard of trackballs. Buttons feel harsh and need to be pushed way too deep to register a click. The twist to scroll hurts to use. On the plus side it is quite thin and the scroll is smooth.

Please note: the new software removed the "media mode". Pretty dumb this was no longer an option.
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Verified Purchase
Switched from a Trackman Marble (10+ years) to this - took a little bit getting used to, but after about 2 weeks it feels much nicer and wouldn't switch back. The scrolling works very well, again took some tweaking of the software to get reasonable responses. But now its so intuitive and easy to scroll, am very glad to have gotten this (compared to something with a secondary scroll wheel).

I used the 'inertial scroll' and 'pointer acceleration' features in the software which seem to give you a good trade-off between speed/accuracy.

EDIT: 6-month update: still holding up just fine, and the scroll feature is great. Have my old trackball setup on another computer right now, and the lack of scroll feature is rather annoying! Once you switch to this one, hard to go back to one without the scroll.
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Verified Purchase
I bought this to replace my aging CST L-Trac - I used it both at home and at work and wore the left-click button out over several years of very heavy use. Soldering in a new switch probably isn't too tough, and I liked the L-Trac enough that I would buy a new one without a second thought if I couldn't fix it, but I've been curious about the Slimblade for awhile and thought I'd take the opportunity to try it out. The bulk of this review will be in comparison to the L-Trac. I have also used a Kensington Orbit, the wide grey one, so I can compare to that in a few points as well.

The size, shape, and button layout are notably different from the L-Trac. The Slimblade is lower, shorter in length, but also wider than the L-Trac. I have large hands, and I'm used to having my entire hand on the trackball, using the ball with the middle of my fingers so I can each the middle mouse button and scroll wheel, which on the L-Trac are centered directly above the ball. The L-Trac's buttons are large, running the entire side of the ball; I found myself pressing the left-click with my thumb on the lower part of the button, where the Slimblade's lower left button is, and the right-click with my ring and pinky fingers at the upper part of the button, where the Slimblade's upper right button is.

By default, though, the Slimblade seems to expect to be held differently, with your fingertips on the ball and your hand further back, using the rearmost switches with your thumb and pinky finger. The fact that it uses the ball to scroll reinforces this, as it's easier done with your fingertips rather than the middle of your fingers.
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Two changes, and this would be my pointing device for the rest of my life:

1. Make a wireless version.
2. Change the finishing to matte. Glossy finish is slippery, and attracts dirt and grease from my finger. I really don't see advantage of glossy finishing on anything personally, but on something that actually comes into contact with you, glossy finishing is a bad idea.
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I like this trackball so much, I eventually bought two and I am still using the first one after two years.

I had been a mouse user for two decades and because of RSI, I started mousing with my left hand. I then switch to trackballs, for both left and right side and all my RSI symptoms have gone away. A lot of my gaming friends who work with computers are also switching and one swears it cured his "Tennis elbow".

No matter what other trackball I use, I always end up going back to the Slimblade and here is why, in order of importance
1 - You spin the ball clockwise/counter-clockwise (as opposed to forward or sideways) to scroll. It is hard to describe how natural this feels after a while, and as you scroll, it makes a clicking sound so you can tell exactly how much to spin the ball to make the scroll move.
2 - It is dead easy to clean - lift the ball out and run your fingernails over the bearings, which takes less than ten seconds every couple days.
3 - It gets smoother and quieter with time - with oil from your hands, the bearings get smoother and quieter.
4 - With the "Slimblade_trackball_win100.exe", you can click the top left button and control the volume by spinning the ball. With a click and spin, I can now control my system wide volume in case a video starts playing too loud.
5 - The ball is heavy enough to spin the cursor from one side of my six monitor setup to the other.

There are two deficiencies with Slimblade, both related to software:
1 - The latest software, Trackball Works does not work on my Windows 7 system (I haven't tried the Feb 2016 v1.3.1 yet). I keep trying the new versions, but they always show the same problem - it is like the right click is continuously enabled whenever I move the cursor.
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