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Last Days of John Lennon Mass Market Paperback – Sep 1 1992

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Dell; Reprint edition (Sept. 1 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440213436
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440213437
  • Product Dimensions: 17.2 x 10.6 x 2.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #794,521 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Interesting book. Yoko Ono's character here is shrewdly personified. "Imagine", that she was trying to really force her 'music' (warble screetch) on to Double Fantasy. This is while she was having affairs, milking the Lennon fortune, drinking and living like a pack rat-and heavily abusing narcotics. Her songs had to be pitch shifted, note by note just to stay in the key. Sad, that Lennon would refer to her as "mother' in a maternal way.I am not trying to trash Ono. Seaman's insights are vivid-in a documentary style of recorded events. One has to take notice.
Reading this book, you get inside Lennon's day to day behavior.
The Bermuda trip, is especially interesting. Here is a guy, trying to avoid the "mania" of fans (everywhere on the planet) and Seaman for me describes what that was really like. Upon recognition-they are in shock, then they try and get a piece of him, then Lennon moves on, oblivious to their existence and the loss of his essence, seems to be even more of a shock. Beatle mania-and Lennon awe, continued to grow in the 70's as had it first started in the early 60's.
I have read this book 3 times over the last 5 years, and each time it takes you to a different place. Lennon felt the Beatles peaked in 1961 and this comment, and many like this -show how good the group really was, just as they were recording those early mono albums. Raw, full of energy, romantic to the hilt, and with a backbeat you couldn't lose.
When Seaman is beaten by Yoko's bodygard thugs (ex-police officers) you really feel for the guy.It was more torture than just a mere beating. Further more, you certainly can empathize with Julian Lennon and even Paul McCartney who would have to deal with the calculating coldness of Yoko Ono.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa4cb0dbc) out of 5 stars 18 reviews
27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa4a829f0) out of 5 stars The Guy Was There Jan. 31 2004
By Michael Sherrer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Interesting book. Yoko Ono's character here is shrewdly personified. "Imagine", that she was trying to really force her 'music' (warble screetch) on to Double Fantasy. This is while she was having affairs, milking the Lennon fortune, drinking and living like a pack rat-and heavily abusing narcotics. Her songs had to be pitch shifted, note by note just to stay in the key. Sad, that Lennon would refer to her as "mother' in a maternal way.I am not trying to trash Ono. Seaman's insights are vivid-in a documentary style of recorded events. One has to take notice.
Reading this book, you get inside Lennon's day to day behavior.
The Bermuda trip, is especially interesting. Here is a guy, trying to avoid the "mania" of fans (everywhere on the planet) and Seaman for me describes what that was really like. Upon recognition-they are in shock, then they try and get a piece of him, then Lennon moves on, oblivious to their existence and the loss of his essence, seems to be even more of a shock. Beatle mania-and Lennon awe, continued to grow in the 70's as had it first started in the early 60's.
I have read this book 3 times over the last 5 years, and each time it takes you to a different place. Lennon felt the Beatles peaked in 1961 and this comment, and many like this -show how good the group really was, just as they were recording those early mono albums. Raw, full of energy, romantic to the hilt, and with a backbeat you couldn't lose.
When Seaman is beaten by Yoko's bodygard thugs (ex-police officers) you really feel for the guy.It was more torture than just a mere beating. Further more, you certainly can empathize with Julian Lennon and even Paul McCartney who would have to deal with the calculating coldness of Yoko Ono.
Seamen is abit of dweep through out this narrative. (playing bongos and keeping a beat, while Lennon works out a few new songs in Bermuda.) Lennon, coming out of 5 year sleep, is full of creative juice, influenced by Bob Marley raggae to the B-52s-while covering his ears-when he hears the rock wallop and head bang of early Led Zeppelin on the radio. I am not writing this to praise Seaman but the guy should be awarded some attention for keeping diaries and copies (the originals were stolen by Yoko's thugs in a burglary) as well as his keen powers of observation, from a guy that was truly there. Right to the end of Lennon's life.

Particularly sad is the fact, that Yoko dismissed any form of protection for John when he would walk into the Dakota Apts-which perhaps would have (think of Reagan's attempted assassination) saved his life. This book may give you dreams at night.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa4a823f0) out of 5 stars Extremely Readable March 23 2010
By Book Woman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
John Lennon must surely be the Rorschach celebrity of our generation. No matter how much you read about him, each author interprets him a little bit differently. In this case, Seaman--who was John's personal assistant for the last 21 months of his life--gives us the scoop on his quotidian affairs. His intimate perspective is very readable, as it depicts John's foibles without any hint of disrespect and showcases his strengths without being toady. The portrait that emerges is one of a very complicated man, driven by needs and conflicts that sometimes made a shambles of his life and relationships. I have read other Lennon books that made him sound pretty much like a jerk, but he comes off here as interesting and very human, someone you wish you could have met, someone who at the end of his life was trying his best on many fronts. Seaman's affection for John is evident, but his somewhat chilly regard for Yoko will only reinforce for many her image as a cold, calculating woman and ruthless adversary. The book debunks the myth of them as a happy couple and the impression that John was content away from the limelight, satisfied just to be a bread-baking househusband.

So what's in the book? John felt very competitive with the ex-Beatles, Paul McCartney and George Harrison, pretty much shunning any contact with them. Yoko was cheating on him with the bisexual who became her live-in lover for a while after John's death. But John needed her to fill his mother void and manage his fortune, while she wanted him for his money and fame. Thus, they were locked in a painful but symbiotic dance, portraying themselves to the world like soul mates while coming precariously close to divorce. Their enthrallment with divination is explored. John had lost his musical spark for a period of years, but got it back on a trip to Bermuda after he was the only crewman able to skipper his rented yacht through a perilous storm. He stayed on the island without Yoko to write the music that would later comprise Double Fantasy, his comeback album. John was a health food fanatic and a heavy smoker, self-admittedly obsessed with sex and cruel fantasies about women. (The story of his losing his virginity at age 15 is included.) There are tales of his drug use. The contrast between his loving bond with son Sean, only four at the time of John's murder, is contrasted with the relationship that never seemed to gel between him and his first son Julian. All of these tidbits could come off sounding like salacious gossip, but in Seaman's capable hands they do not. Rather, this is a sober account of a complex, talented, and very wealthy individual who lived life in large terms as written by someone who knew him well.

I only have one criticism of this book. The details of John's shocking death are given scant coverage at the end, as Seaman lapses into his own story of why he took John's personal journals out of the Dakota "to give to Julian, as his dad would have wanted." The transition is simply too abrupt, and the author's account of what he did seems a bit disingenuous. Read this volume first, then have a look at Robert Rosen's Nowhere Man, and you will get a better understanding of both crimes.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa4b818d0) out of 5 stars Interesting and believeable May 3 2005
By realistic hysteric - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Imagine the concept here - You're going to work for one of the most famous, coolest guys of the rock era...wouldn't you keep notes, a diary? I sure the heck would, confidentiality agreement or not!

The result - this fascinating book! Of course we get to hear the bad, such as Lennon's penchant for lying around depressed, getting wasted, but we hear many positive aspects, such as the pleasures he did find in his last years, including sailing, for which apparently he had a knack. All the Lennon books I have read tend to agree that he did like to chat quite a bit, so the author, being Lennon's personal assistant, undoubtably became privy to a lot of went on in Lennon's life at the time. Based on the many interviews (Rolling Stone to Playboy, etc.,) it would seem Lennon's reality and his feeling of events that took place in his life varied upon his moods. This book seems to catch him in many unguarded, unrehearsed moments.

Events in this book I particularly liked: Lennon's first loathing of, then eventual liking and purchase of the (then) latest McCartney single; The Lennon's desire to own a Mecedes station wagon (fulfilled); his interactions (positive and negative) with folks he meets and deals with during his trips.

You get a sense of joy and happiness in Lennon when he's out vacationing, only to feel his disappointment when Yoko can't or won't join him. It does appear he worked hard on the marriage.

The usual grains of salt need to be ingested...the writer was famously fired and sued by Yoko, therefore he could purposely be putting her in a less than flattering light (not always, to be fair). Perhaps the writer inflates his own feelings of involvement in John's life. But all in all, it's an interesting book, and a joy for this Lennon fan to feel "in on" some of the day to day goings on of a man who, it feels to me, was just starting to come to terms with and enjoy the fruits of his fame and labors.

How I wish we could read the diaries that Lennon himself kept! Frederic Seaman had those (hence his firing and the lawsuit!), and based this book upon those and his own diaries. However. they are now, or were, in the possession of Yoko! Do they exist anymore, or have they been destroyed???????
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa4b82774) out of 5 stars house-husband or hermit? March 23 2010
By Sheena Carver - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I highly recommend this book. It was written by the man who worked as Lennon's assistant for the last two years of John's life. He tells of John's seclusion in the Dakota, and recounts tales of John & Yoko's relationship. Yoko, who had become John's business manager after the infamous "Lost Weekend" period, was distant and aloof towards her husband-yet still controlling of John-juggling relationships with two other men at the same time. She goes so far as to command John to enter a period of silence in which he is not allowed to speak for a number of days. She spends much of their marriage on the phone in her bedroom, and John has to ask her assistant if she has the time to see him. Despite the dismal state of John's relationship, the author shows John entering a happier time in his life just prior to his murder in which John was again writing songs, making an album, and promoting his music.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa4d53060) out of 5 stars WOW! .... I think Fred Seamen is the real deal! March 16 2010
By Jimmy H. Frederickson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I have read many books on John Lennon, but I think this one maybe all you need if your interested in his last years.
What an insight on how he and Yoko lived, very sad to me along with there spoiled brat! buy this book you wont be able to put it down...FRED! you did a great job! sorry you got such a bad deal from yoko on it...It must have hit home!

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