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Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Moderate wear on cover and edges. Minimal highlighting and/or other markings can be present. May be ex-library copy and may not include CD, Accessories and/or Dust Cover. Good readable copy.
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The Legend of Sleepy Hollow Hardcover – Aug 17 1990

4.2 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

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Hardcover, Aug 17 1990
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 112 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (Aug. 17 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0688052762
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688052768
  • Product Dimensions: 17.1 x 1.3 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 399 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #161,208 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Paintings by Grandma Moses's great-grandson make a striking match for Irving's classic story of strange goings-on in a small town in the Hudson Valley. Though greatly condensed, the plot remains intact; Ichabod Crane, the gangly schoolteacher, is driven out of Sleepy Hollow by a pumpkin-headed horseman who may (or may not) have been his flesh-and-blood rival to the affections of Katrina, a well-off young beauty. The paintings-naive, bright and straightforward in the tradition associated with Moses's illustrious forebear-suit the story stylistically although they do not fully enter into its spirit; they do not vary to plumb the moods of the story, which range from low country comedy to romance to suspense and terror. But the illustrations are well placed, either as two-page set pieces of the churchyard or Katrina's family farm (these are strikingly similar in composition to the work of Grandma Moses), or as small vignettes amidst the text. Overall, an attractive illustrated storybook, which may excite interest in the original. Ages 6-up.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From School Library Journal

Grade 5-8-- An unabridged version of the classic tale of Ichabod Crane, his affection for the wealthy and beautiful Katrina Van Tassel, and his confrontation with the Headless Horseman. Despite Irving's outmoded narrative style, this is still an excellent ghost story that combines appropriate amounts of humor and terror while integrating Germanic legend with New England folklore, specifically that of New York State. Garland's realistic oil paintings are either portraitures or landscapes. The former are reminiscent of Barry Moser's work, while the latter resemble those by Thomas Locker. While these illustrations act as a sophisticated balance to Irving's wordy narrative, they do not consistently evoke the mood of Arthur Rackham's interpretation (1990). In her retelling for younger children (1987, both Morrow), Diane Wolkstein avoids the African-American stereotypes that Irving used for ``comic relief'' and concentrates on telling a good story, eliminating the complicated and archaic language of the period. All in all, this new version is useful where additional copies of the unabridged edition are needed. --Andrew W. Hunter, Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg, Charlotte, NC
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The original 1928 Arthur Rackham edition of Washington Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (first published in 1819) was one of the most beautifully illustrated versions of the tale ever produced. This Books Of Wonder facsimile of that edition is certainly the finest available today, though folk artist Will Moses' bright retelling runs a close second. Rackham's watercolors for this American classic are very much in keeping with his earlier work, which had established him as the greatest British illustrator of his era.
Where much of Irving's tale is painted in the warm autumn hues, Rackham choose to portray Sleep Hollow as not only a place of overwhelming haunts and visions, but as a region existing in a state of permanent, moody twilight. His Sleep Hollow seems perpetually in crepuscular shadow: the last pure rays of the sun have just vanished from the earth, and darkness, though it has not fallen yet, is falling quickly. In the artist's eye, Irving's fireside tale appears to take place not in glorious mid-October, but in storm-swept late November. The illustrator's anthropomorphic and archetypal Sleepy Hollow also magnifies elements of Irving's romantic landscape over and above the necessities of the text. While witches, ghosts, and visions are discussed in the story, Rackham depicts the trees, houses, and countryside of the region as teeming with every kind of fairy, goblin, dryad, and witch, as if calmly revealing to the eyes of man the always coexistent if invisible supernatural life of the Hudson River Valley. His painting of Major Andre's Tree, for example, depicts a traditional European fairytale witch and her black cat familiar walking along the road beneath Andre's tree as if they had every right to be there.
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Format: Hardcover
Will Moses' illustrated retelling of Washington Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow rivals Arthur Rackham's near century-old version as the best edition of the book ever published. The Rackham version, with its moody, archetypal illustrations, has the slight edge, as it contains Irving's full original text in addition to Rackham's spectacular artwork.
However, Moses's simplification of the narrative is masterfully executed, and the colorful, playful, and numerous paintings which adorn the book have a warm period charm of genuine Americana. Moses portrays the Hudson River Valley as a lush expansive valley not unlike the Garden of Eden on the first day of creation. Happy farmers, their wives and children, cows, geese, ducks and pigs frolic together amid fields of wheat and corn; galleons approach dramatically from the river; and the Catskill Mountains, sun, and sky suggested an infinite panorama and endless horizon full of promise.
The story tells us that the Dutch colonists were a superstitious lot, and that the Sleepy Hollow region itself was or seemed to be under a spell of some kind. The farmers and their wives suspected witchcraft; strange music was heard in the air; visions were seen; and the inhabitants themselves lived their lives in a kind of continuous dreamy revery. These tales and superstitions give rise to the legend of the headless horseman, said to be the ghost of a Hessian soldier who lost his head to a canon ball in the war, and now nightly prowling the region in search of it. Moses' nocturnal landscapes of the swamps, hills and the Old Dutch Cemetery under a bright harvest moon are particularly effective. Significantly, these stark, haunted landscapes do not violate the spirit of the book, but enrich its sense of wonder.
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Format: Hardcover
I have experienced several productions of "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow," in person, on stage, on screen and in books. None of them is as good as this book/cassette set, with the combination of Glen Close's narrative talents in relating the story and being able to read along in the wonderfully illustrated book graced with period "artwork." The mystery and atmosphere of this story is perfectly captured; the story is expertly edited and narrated. Close is a storytelling genius and is completely and effectively able to switch personae and voices as she re-tells this classic story. I have listened to it with my children during long drives in the car at night, and I have listened to it on bright autumn afternoons by myself. I have carted it around and I have lent it to many people, with the result that I no longer have my copy! Autumn and Halloween were not the same last year without it. This set is completely as entertaining for adults as it is for children. No school library,no home should be without a copy.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I began reading this book with high hopes. I expected it to be a great book filled with great suspense sequences and rousing dialogue.
Way wrong.
It's just about how the main character, Ichabod Crane, became a teacher and his affairs with Lady Van Trussel and his fued with Brom Bones. You learn that Ichabod is interested in the dark arts and stuff like that. It gets pretty repetitive after a while.
The book isn't divided into chapters or sections. Barely even paragrahps. There isn't much dialogue and half the book is just a bunch of words that shouldn't even be in there. Irving probably ran out of ideas and he didn't want to end the book after ten pages, so he just put in a bunch of characters and crap that aren't relative to the plot of the book.
They spend so much time using non-useful words that after a while, you begin to forget what the book is about.
When they finally mention the Headless Horseman halfway through, it's very unsatisfying. And in the final encounter between Crane and the Horseman, it's another thing you could care less about.
The book has too many dissapointments to keep people interested and really isn't too suspenseful. It isn't even that scary. I'm not to sure I want to see the movie now, but anything even relating to the Headless Horseman has to be better than this.
Happy reading. At least try to.
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