Quantity:1
Life, Above All [Blu-ray]... has been added to your Cart
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Video Flash
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: All discs are FULL GUARANTEED!!! Previously viewed rental product, all discs are cleaned and checked for playability. Dvd box and discs MAY have rental sticker(s), The cd may have plastic wrap and burglar alarms, we ship each business day!
Compare Offers on Amazon
Add to Cart
CDN$ 38.19
& FREE Shipping. Details
Sold by: Fulfillment Express CA
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Life, Above All [Blu-ray] (Sous-titres français)

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 19.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
13 new from CDN$ 19.77 5 used from CDN$ 16.20

Deal of the Day: "DC Starter Pack (Arrow Season 1, Gotham Season 1, The Flash Season 1)" for $49.99
For one day only: The DC Starter Pack is at a one day special price. Offer valid on July 26, 2016, applies only to purchases of products sold by Amazon.ca, and does not apply to products sold by third-party merchants and other sellers through the Amazon.ca site. Learn more.


Product Details

  • Actors: Khomotso Manyaka, Keaobaka Makanyane, Harriet Lenabe, Lerato Mvelase, Tinah Mnumzana
  • Directors: Oliver Schmitz
  • Writers: Oliver Schmitz, Allan Stratton, Dennis Foon
  • Producers: Dan Schlanger, Daniela Ramin, Greig Buckle, Helge Sasse
  • Format: AC-3, Dolby, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: French, English
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : Parental Guidance (PG)
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • Release Date: Dec 6 2011
  • Run Time: 100 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B005MYEPZ0
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #44,303 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

After her infant sister dies, a young South African girl hears rumors around her village that force her mother to leave.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Richard TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Jan. 14 2014
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Wow. I mean WOW. What a great, great film. It was so well acted, the actors were so real (no Hollywood plastic faces to be seen), the scenery was rough and real, the emotions...I could go on and on. I am not an emotional person but the ending had me choked up. It was also one of the extremely rare movies which I viewed in one sitting. It was just the best film I've seen in a very long time.
2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
By Tommy Dooley HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on March 29 2012
Format: DVD
This moving film is based on the book 'Chanda's Secret's' by Allan Stratton and has been adapted for the screen by the much talented Oliver Schmitz (Paris Je te'aime). It is the story of Chanda played with great ability by first time actress Khomotso Manyaka. Her father is dead and her mother has remarried a no good alcoholic who has borne him three more children, Chanda is the eldest and so when her mother becomes 'ill' she takes on the role of mother, carer and worrier for the whole family.

The step father is an alcoholic who has forgotten why he started drinking but not where to go for it and drunken 'extra marital conjugation'. He also blames his wife for the death of their youngest child, but is still able to steal the funeral money for his own ends.

Into this mix Chanda has an only friend called Esther; this poor soul has no-one, no hope and no money. She ekes out an existence by selling her under age body to predators who stop at the local lorry park. Her 'lifestyle choice' as some would call it means that she is cast out by the community. This community also believes in witchcraft, superstition and quack doctors. They also believe that 'The Disease' 'HIV is a punishment from God and that the person with it is possessed. Chanda is judged by the company she keeps and because she wants to do what is right she too gets judged.

This is a beautifully acted , directed and photographed piece of cinema, the story itself would have been compelling enough but so much more is thrown into the mix, that would be spoilers if divulged, that this becomes something special.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9fbcfa80) out of 5 stars 20 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa22aa888) out of 5 stars Inspirational Film Making from South Africa March 29 2012
By Tommy Dooley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
This moving film is based on the book `Chanda's Secret's' by Allan Stratton and has been adapted for the screen by the much talented Oliver Schmitz (Paris Je te'aime). It is the story of Chanda played with great ability by first time actress Khomotso Manyaka. Her father is dead and her mother has remarried a no good alcoholic who has borne him three more children, Chanda is the eldest and so when her mother becomes `ill' she takes on the role of mother, carer and worrier for the whole family.

The step father is an alcoholic who has forgotten why he started drinking but not where to go for it and drunken `extra marital conjugation'. He also blames his wife for the death of their youngest child, but is still able to steal the funeral money for his own ends.

Into this mix Chanda has an only friend called Esther; this poor soul has no-one, no hope and no money. She ekes out an existence by selling her under age body to predators who stop at the local lorry park. Her `lifestyle choice' as some would call it means that she is cast out by the community. This community also believes in witchcraft, superstition and quack doctors. They also believe that `The Disease' -HIV is a punishment from God and that the person with it is possessed. Chanda is judged by the company she keeps and because she wants to do what is right she too gets judged.

This is a beautifully acted , directed and photographed piece of cinema, the story itself would have been compelling enough but so much more is thrown into the mix, that would be spoilers if divulged, that this becomes something special.

Whilst the film deals with the unfounded prejudices of South African society and some very cruel people, this is also a story of love and devotion as well as hardships that are so alien to us in the `west' but are an every day occurrence for far too many in the wider world. For serious world cinema fans this is an absolute must see, it is in Northern Sotho with sub titles in English; highly recommended.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa22aa8dc) out of 5 stars The courage of a daughter Jan. 7 2013
By Tee O. - Published on Amazon.com
The first reviewer gives an excellent synopsis of the film. Having visited S.A. I was pleased to recognize the "neighborhood" as realistic - including the neighbor party scene - one of the brighter, fun moments of the film.

(don't want to add spoilers) Chanda's courage to rescue and continue to love her friend Ester as well as the love she has for her mother is a beautiful thing to watch. She is quiet, compassionate and sure of herself. Not many girls in the west her age would have the maturity demonstrated by Chanda in this movie and there's a lesson to be learned by young and old alike to not be part of "the pack" - think for yourself.

Great little film. Enjoyed the story as well as the cinematography.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa22aac90) out of 5 stars Just watch, don't hesitate Jan. 4 2012
By evidje - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Great movie. Evokes various emotions. Glad I stumbled on this one. I have never posted review about movies, but I felt I owe this movie one.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa22aae70) out of 5 stars Inspirational Film Making from South Africa Dec 24 2013
By Tommy Dooley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
This moving film is based on the book `Chanda's Secret's' by Allan Stratton and has been adapted for the screen by the much talented Oliver Schmitz (Paris Je te'aime). It is the story of Chanda played with great ability by first time actress Khomotso Manyaka. Her father is dead and her mother has remarried a no good alcoholic who has borne him three more children, Chanda is the eldest and so when her mother becomes `ill' she takes on the role of mother, carer and worrier for the whole family.

The step father is an alcoholic who has forgotten why he started drinking but not where to go for it and drunken `extra marital conjugation'. He also blames his wife for the death of their youngest child, but is still able to steal the funeral money for his own ends.

Into this mix Chanda has an only friend called Esther; this poor soul has no-one, no hope and no money. She ekes out an existence by selling her under age body to predators who stop at the local lorry park. Her `lifestyle choice' as some would call it means that she is cast out by the community. This community also believes in witchcraft, superstition and quack doctors. They also believe that `The Disease' -HIV is a punishment from God and that the person with it is possessed. Chanda is judged by the company she keeps and because she wants to do what is right she too gets judged.

This is a beautifully acted , directed and photographed piece of cinema, the story itself would have been compelling enough but so much more is thrown into the mix, that would be spoilers if divulged, that this becomes something special.

Whilst the film deals with the unfounded prejudices of South African society and some very cruel people, this is also a story of love and devotion as well as hardships that are so alien to us in the `west' but are an every day occurrence for far too many in the wider world. For serious world cinema fans this is an absolute must see, it is in Northern Sotho with sub titles in English; highly recommended.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa00b91d4) out of 5 stars Stigma and ostracism in South Africa May 7 2013
By Kendrick - Published on Amazon.com
Life, Above All is not a film for the faint of heart. This gut-wrenching South African film, adapted from Alan Stratton's novel Chandra's Secret, is a fictional thread in a very real piece of South Africa's fabric, namely, children orphaned by AIDS. Chandra is a 12-year old girl, living with her mother and two younger siblings fathered by another man who is an alcoholic that returns to visit his children unexpectedly at random intervals. She lives in a village where gossip is the lifeblood of the community, coupled with a heightened sense of propriety and pharisaism. Life, Above All gives us the story of Chandra, who must face adult challenges as a young girl, must stare death in the face and yet remain true to herself. And more importantly, it asks us to question our prejudices.

The opening scenes of Life, Above All show Chandra having to arrange a funeral for her youngest sibling, who just died in infancy. We immediately see Chandra, as a young girl, forced to carry the responsibilities of a household's head because her mother is incapacitated and both her father and her step-father gone. Mrs. Tafa, their next door neighbor, plays the role of a helpful aunt. Chandra's mother is sick and they go to visit a doctor, but that doesn't help. Eventually, building up to the climax of the film, her mother leaves for her hometown in another village. In the meantime, Chandra takes in a girl who was forced into prostitution, much to Mrs. Tafa's consternation and the scandalization of the village.

Chandra keeps on trying to get ahold of her mother via telephone to ascertain the date of her return, but it seems almost impossible. It is revealed that Chandra's mother has HIV/AIDS and will not be returning in order to spare her children from stigmatization. The film's portrayal of the deep prejudice against those with HIV/AIDS is a searing condemnation along the same proportions as The Crucible. It is more like a witch hunt, but this time without a trial.

Chandra travels to her mother's hometown, against Mrs. Tafa's wishes, only to find that she's been exiled by her own family. Chandra finds her mother in the outskirts of the village, waiting to die. In one of the most touching moments in the film, Chandra cradles her mother and gives her water using a wet cloth. She vows to bring her mother home, but her troubles are not over yet.

Chandra returns to the village with her mother via an ambulance, and all the neighbors come out of their homes and begin causing a ruckus, verbally abusing Chandra for bringing her infected mother into their presence. Mrs. Tafa, next door, hides behind her window blinds and begins her transformation as she is torn between her desire to protect Chandra, while also fearful of what the neighbors will think and how she will be perceived by their tight-knit community.

Ironically, this village is "Christian," in that most people are shown singing in the church choir and attending service at various intervals. Simultaneously, there is a syncretism occurring between indigenous shamanistic folk religion and Christianity, which is portrayed in a scene where Chandra's family hires a witch doctor to cast out her mother's sickness. But it is these "Christians" that condemning Chandra and her mother, fearful of the stigma it will bring. They were already wary of the prostitute living with them, but now they have had enough.

Then came Mrs. Tafa's conversion moment. She steps out of her house and plants herself between the mob and Chandra's house, bravely calling them out for their hypocrisy. Mrs. Tafa ridicules them for the scandalous things they do behind their own doors, but that no one talks about. In essence, let the one without sin cast the first stone.

The biblical parallels (John 8) are so clear that I would be inclined to say that the filmmakers must have wanted to draw them. After Mrs. Tafa's challenge, much like in Jesus' situation, the mob disperses, some in true repentance and others angrier than ever. Christian charity, the kind that Jesus would recognize, is not merely helping out respectable people when you have the resources and the time--Mrs. Tafa taking Chandra and her siblings in when Chandra's mother left--but taking in the lowly, the disreputable, the scandalizing.

This is the challenge of Life, Above All. Will those infected with HIV/AIDS be ostracized from society or will they be treated and welcomed as those made in God's image, for the sake of the sick as well as for their children who face the life of orphans.

[This review was published previously in Schaeffer's Ghost [...]


Look for similar items by category


Feedback