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Lolita (Widescreen) [Import]

4.1 out of 5 stars 122 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 84.05
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Product Details

  • Actors: Jeremy Irons, Dominique Swain, Melanie Griffith, Frank Langella, Suzanne Shepherd
  • Directors: Adrian Lyne
  • Writers: Stephen Schiff, Vladimir Nabokov
  • Producers: Joel B. Michaels, Mario Kassar
  • Format: Special Edition, NTSC, Import
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Lions Gate
  • Release Date: Oct. 12 1999
  • Run Time: 137 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 122 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B00001IVFG
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Product Description

Jeremy Irons is a remarkable man with a poisonous wound. A memory of a fated childhood love and haunting urge to rediscover it's lost passion.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
One of my favorite movies of all time! It is POIGNANT, yet DEEPLY DISTURBING. I saw this movie for the first time years ago and never forgot about it as I am a huge Jeremy Irons fan. Irons does such an outstanding job playing this role that it is even more disturbing. Even so, you cannot look away -- it's like driving by a site of a car crash. You don't want to look, but fascination prevails! Highly Recommend!
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Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
Ageless Lolita by Nabokov.

Weird, depressing, but true and believable love story. Love does not respect age or moral values; it is above law, logic, reason, and sex. Very fine line between pedophilia combined with latent incest and melancholic romance. Final scenes could be omitted, they don''t fit into the main plot.
Lolita is included on Time's list of the 100 best English-language novels, it is 4th on the Modern Library's 1998 list of the 100 Best Novels of the 20th century, and on World Library's list of one of The 100 Best Books of All Time.(Wikipedia)
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Format: DVD
How good did Adrian Lyne have to be to compete with Vladimir Nabokov and Stanley Kubrick in his 1997 version of the great "Lolita"? So good that he transcends wicked humor, achieving the echoes of real tragedy - well above the Python-esque thrill of absurdity achieved by Kubrick and even by the master himself, Nabokov.
Charles Dickens wrote of his favorite character, David Copperfield, that "he has a disciplined heart", and Lyne brings this eminently sane, innately forgiving love of all the novel's characters to this controlled, beautifully scored and accurately scripted film.
Lyne's closing note on the deaths of Humbert and Lolita (only a month apart, in November and December, 1950 - he of coronary thrombosis in prison, and she of complications in childbirth) tolls like a clear and gentle cathedral bell. It signals the end of an obsession comparable to the medieval idea of courtly love - which had absolutely nothing to do with marriage, but plenty to do with high-quality, sublime booty - and the end of a truly good film: a masterpiece of appreciation.
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Format: DVD
It is impossible to make a faithful (legal) movie of Nabokov's novel. However, this is very good approximation of it.
Jeremy Irons is perfectly cast as Humbert, and captures the kind of clueless social fumbling and bumbling which is a large part of the character in the novel. Humbert is not comfortable around people of any age. Domenique Swain, in her first role, pulls off an acceptable version of the title character, both vulnerable and crafty. Although Frank Langella is no Peter Sellers, his rendition of Clare Quilty is much more realistic and true to the novel - even the over-the-top death scene with the ballet-like movements and red spit-bubble is almost straight from the book. A real problem was casting Melanie Griffith as Charlotte - unfortunately she was completely wrong for the part - being too shrill and light.
The cinematography was excellent. The feeling of travel - 27,000 miles in the course of a couple years, and geography plays a substantial part in the book, and was well represented in the movie.
Beautiful score by Morricone, who also did the well-regarded "The Mission" score.
For all the good things in the movie, the same three things in both the Lyne and Kubrick versions bother me, as I feel it robs Humbert of some nuance to his character:
1. No mention of first wife. He was not always just into nymphets.
2. No mention of second wife, Rita, (and taping the goodbye note to her navel so she would find it).
3. The last page and a half from the book was left out. This is possibly the most moving passage of the novel - when Hubert offers his apology for all his nastiness, and his admonition to Lolita, and the revelation that neither Lolita nor Humbert are alive as we read the book, and his pathetic summation...
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Format: DVD
Certainly the most compelling screen version of Lolita, Adrian Lyne has a much better feel for the story than did Stanley Kubrick, and Dominique Swain is much better cast as the young femme fatale than was Sue Lyon. But, the most striking feature of this film is the cinematography which gives the story a much more evocative feel. While it is through Humbert Humbert that we see Lolita, Lyne finds more subtle ways to probe Lolita than did Kubrick, who treated her very much as an object. I suppose in that sense it may have been a little closer to Nabokov's original telling, but Lyne has a more sensitive eye to detail and the devastating relationship that forms between Humbert and Lolita. The script stays close to the novel. Lyne lavishes much attention on the cross-country trip and the rain-soaked stay in New Orleans. I felt Jeremy Irons did a better job than James Mason in capturing Humbert's psyche, better able to convey the emotions that led to his ill-fated obsession in Lolita. The film also evocatively recalls the genesis for Humbert's obsession. It was a bold move by Adrian Lyne, demonstrating a thoughtful understanding of the novel and not trying to add any form of moral judgement on it.
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Format: DVD
"Lolita" rings bells about childhood feelings of inadequacy and ugly duckling complex. It's about envying the beautiful, skinny, immoral child vamps who triumph and get whatever they want from both children and adults, no matter how unworthy, while poor ducklings, too ugly to bewitch and not old enough to persuade through speech, can only dream of possessing such instant, inescapable power. I think many children can relate to the fantasy of having your parents in the palm of your hand, and anyone can pose him/herself the question of what it must be like to be someone's Godess on Earth.
It's about how everyone wishes, but for one moment, to ever possess an ounce of that extraordinary power of beauty and youthfulness that only a privileged few ever seem to have.
It's about how some memories of pleasure you experience as a child will remain forever living in your heart, not at all like yellowing old photos in an album, or decaying flowers in a vase. About how much we are all like children, in that sense of living things in a super intense immortal way, when we are truly, devastatingly in love.
Most of "Lolita"'s evocative, poetic power is vastly due to Enio Morricone, a living genius. To watch the movie as basically a video clip to his soundtrack is to merely do him justice. For the words, Jeremy Irons' voice is a dream come true.
Some might swim in the waters of other anguishes and desires while watching it. I'll swim in mine.
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