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Lone Wolf Paperback – April 1 2016


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Product details

  • Item Weight : 345 g
  • Paperback : 348 pages
  • ISBN-10 : 0994837127
  • ISBN-13 : 978-0994837127
  • Dimensions : 12.7 x 2.01 x 20.32 cm
  • Publisher : Tricklewood Press; 1st edition (April 1 2016)
  • Language: : English

Product description

Review

Human nature, animal instincts, predator, and prey all converge as the hunters become the hunted. The forest comes alive through the eyes of one very special twelve-year-old in Lone Wolf, the second book in a series from Robin Mason set amid the rivers, mountains, and enchanted woods of Oregon. Human nature, animal instincts, predator, and prey all converge as the hunters become the hunted in this installment of the Oldenglen Chronicles. Still adjusting to his family's move from England to America and to his newfound secret life as Jax the Wolf, Jackson begins his career at Bear Creek Valley Middle School without much enthusiasm. After gaining powers from the Gladestone, a mystical red granite pillar hidden in the glen, Jax is now a boy with all the heightened senses and instincts of the canis lupis, able to speak with wild animals. When a gang of bullies threatens to unleash his inner wolf and invade his home, Jax must learn to accept and harness his dual nature while once again defending Oldenglen. The title might refer to a lone wolf, but Jax has an array of colorful sidekicks, allies, and adversaries, both of the two- and four-legged variety, not to mention winged, antlered, fanged, and furry, and while his best friend Sarah makes an appearance, the emphasis is on Jax's fears and internal struggles. When Sarah notes that it's "not easy being a wolf," Jackson rejoins, "Not easy being a human sometimes"-certainly not when confronted by a group of bullies, nicknamed "The Wolf Pack" and led by Noah and his aptly named friend, Hunter. Lone Wolf does an admirable job of highlighting the wonders and harsher realities of nature, including wolves in particular as both predators and protectors. The bullies themselves are a bit over-the-top, though their disturbed stalking and physical and verbal abuse are seemingly forgotten by the conclusion. A variety of entertaining British slang peppers Jax's speech and internal monologues, from well-known phrases like "bloke" and "blimey" to the more obscure "banjaxed" and "billy-o," although this usage seems forced at times, particularly when Jax feels the need to rephrase or elaborate on his word choice. The numerous animals of Oldenglen each have distinct speech patterns as well that facilitate recognition, cleverly giving them distinct personalities with just a few choice words, as with Hoot the owl's penchant for SHOUTY capitals, and Rhubarb the bullfrog's run-on love of the "applegrannyapple." Middle-grade students will relate to Jax's angst as he tries to understand, accept himself, and become comfortable in his own skin while standing up to the mean kids, all while unintentionally impressing the middle-school ladies with his vast knowledge of ornithology. Fans of Erin Hunter's Warriors series who enjoy talking animals and a focus on nature will want to explore the Oldenglen Chronicles with Jax and Sarah--Foreword Clarion Reviews

***** Five Stars - Human nature, animal instincts, predator, and prey all converge as the hunters become the hunted. The forest comes alive through the eyes of one very special twelve-year-old in Lone Wolf, the second book in a series from Robin Mason set amid the rivers, mountains, and enchanted woods of Oregon. Human nature, animal instincts, predator, and prey all converge as the hunters become the hunted in this installment of the Oldenglen Chronicles. Still adjusting to his family's move from England to America and to his newfound secret life as Jax the Wolf, Jackson begins his career at Bear Creek Valley Middle School without much enthusiasm. After gaining powers from the Gladestone, a mystical red granite pillar hidden in the glen, Jax is now a boy with all the heightened senses and instincts of the canis lupis, able to speak with wild animals. When a gang of bullies threatens to unleash his inner wolf and invade his home, Jax must learn to accept and harness his dual nature while once again defending Oldenglen. The title might refer to a lone wolf, but Jax has an array of colorful sidekicks, allies, and adversaries, both of the two- and four-legged variety, not to mention winged, antlered, fanged, and furry, and while his best friend Sarah makes an appearance, the emphasis is on Jax's fears and internal struggles. When Sarah notes that it's "not easy being a wolf," Jackson rejoins, "Not easy being a human sometimes"-certainly not when confronted by a group of bullies, nicknamed "The Wolf Pack" and led by Noah and his aptly named friend, Hunter. Lone Wolf does an admirable job of highlighting the wonders and harsher realities of nature, including wolves in particular as both predators and protectors. The bullies themselves are a bit over-the-top, though their disturbed stalking and physical and verbal abuse are seemingly forgotten by the conclusion. A variety of entertaining British slang peppers Jax's speech and internal monologues, from well-known phrases like "bloke" and "blimey" to the more obscure "banjaxed" and "billy-o," although this usage seems forced at times, particularly when Jax feels the need to rephrase or elaborate on his word choice. The numerous animals of Oldenglen each have distinct speech patterns as well that facilitate recognition, cleverly giving them distinct personalities with just a few choice words, as with Hoot the owl's penchant for SHOUTY capitals, and Rhubarb the bullfrog's run-on love of the "applegrannyapple." Middle-grade students will relate to Jax's angst as he tries to understand, accept himself, and become comfortable in his own skin while standing up to the mean kids, all while unintentionally impressing the middle-school ladies with his vast knowledge of ornithology. Fans of Erin Hunter's Warriors series who enjoy talking animals and a focus on nature will want to explore the Oldenglen Chronicles with Jax and Sarah--Foreword Clarion Reviews *** This laudable tale is more exciting than the series' first, which Mason co-wrote with his father. Handling exposition thoroughly but efficiently, the author dives right into the story to establish the new villains. Noah, et. al., even if mere eighth-graders, are genuinely scary; he and older brother Nate, in a discernible black truck, follow Jackson's bus all the way home. Despite further distress (Jackson's missing porcupine buddy Squiffle) and the occasional menacing animal (a bull elk literally looking for a fight), the narrative's predominantly jaunty. The good guys, for one, are surprisingly skilled at psychological warfare, opting to disturb the bullies' sleep and campsite, which results in hilarious directives: "Send in the moles." [214] Jackson battles relatable issues, too, including loneliness, feeling like both wolf and human with no real pack of his own. A morally-sound hero who earns sympathy and cheers as a champion of the wildlife.--Kirkus Reviews

***** Five Stars - Human nature, animal instincts, predator, and prey all converge as the hunters become the hunted. The forest comes alive through the eyes of one very special twelve-year-old in Lone Wolf, the second book in a series from Robin Mason set amid the rivers, mountains, and enchanted woods of Oregon. Human nature, animal instincts, predator, and prey all converge as the hunters become the hunted in this installment of the Oldenglen Chronicles....Middle-grade students will relate to Jax's angst as he tries to understand, accept himself, and become comfortable in his own skin while standing up to the mean kids, all while unintentionally impressing the middle-school ladies with his vast knowledge of ornithology. Fans of Erin Hunter's Warriors series who enjoy talking animals and a focus on nature will want to explore the Oldenglen Chronicles with Jax and Sarah--Foreword Clarion Reviews

This laudable tale is more exciting than the series' first, which Mason co-wrote with his father...Jackson battles relatable issues, too, including loneliness, feeling like both wolf and human with no real pack of his own. A morally-sound hero who earns sympathy and cheers as a champion of the wildlife.-Kirkus Reviews

***** Five Stars - In Lone Wolf Robin Mason has created a marvelous world filled with suspense and wonderful characters. While bullying is a common plot trope in books for young people, Mason does a great job of creating a story with a fresh and new way. His descriptions are vivid and rich and transported me into the world from the first scene. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who loves magical, talking animals, suspense-filled adventures, and relatable characters. The interaction between Jackson and the animals is natural and avoids falling into the corny pit. Also, the pacing and action kept me reading, wanting to find out what happens next. All the characters were engaging and rich, with varying personalities and magic that made me wish I lived in Oldenglen. This is unquestionably a book worth reading and a series worth following. Kris Moger for Readers' Favorite

Lone Wolf is an excellent fantasy adventure for eight to twelve-year-olds. The story is appropriate for tweens with issues of bullying and an overlying theme of friendship. Learning the value of being one with nature and preserving the wildlife and their habitats is also a major component throughout this series. While recommended for young readers, Lone Wolf has lessons for everyone of all ages. Teri Davis for Bestsellers World

I would recommend "Lone Wolf" by Robin Mason for people who like fiction and nature. It was engaging and came with a powerful message about how important it is to preserve nature. I couldn't put this book down until I finished it, and I'm very hopeful that there will be more books in the series! Evan Weldon for Reader Views

About the Author

The story behind the series known as The Oldenglen Chronicles, of which Lone Wolf is the second book, came from the time Robin Mason's family was renting a large estate in the Pacific Northwest, many years ago. As a young boy, Robin grew up with the written word. His father, Michael, an English professor and co-author of Oldenglen, the first book in the series, would read to him every night, including such works as the Narnia books, Wind in the Willows, the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings trilogy. The third book in the series, Rogue Wolf, will be published later in 2016.

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