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The Longest Day: The Classic Epic of D-Day by [Ryan, Cornelius]
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The Longest Day: The Classic Epic of D-Day Kindle Edition

4.9 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews

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A true classic of World War II history, The Longest Day tells the story of the massive Allied invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944. Journalist Cornelius Ryan began working on the book in the mid-1950s, while the memories of the D-day participants were still fresh, and he spent three years interviewing D-day survivors in the United States and Europe. When his book was first published in 1959, it was tremendously successful, establishing many of the legends of D-day that endure in the public's mind. Ryan was enormously skillful at weaving small personal stories into the overall narrative, and he would later use the same technique to depict the airborne invasion of Holland in A Bridge Too Far. Not only is The Longest Day a pleasure to read, but subsequent historians, dutifully noting its accuracy, have relied heavily on Ryan's research for their own accounts. In short, the book is a "must read" for anyone interested in the D-day invasion. --Robert McNamara

From Publishers Weekly

Ryan's classic military study, the basis for the 1972 film with John Wayne, is reissed for the 50th anniversary of D-Day.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 51633 KB
  • Print Length: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (Feb. 9 2010)
  • Sold by: Simon & Schuster Canada, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000SEIXZW
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #114,565 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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4.9 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback
In the entire breadth and length of world history, few events stir the imagination and possess one's profound interest like World War II. It is probably because, had it not been a so tragic and so real of a war, it would have made for tremendous cinema. Never in this world's history has so much been at stake in an armed conflict; and never has there been a war with so many highs and lows, with mind-boggling twists and more drama and tension than 1000 movies. The early tragic days of war, like Germany's 'blitzkrieg' (lightning war) assault on France were tempered by the minor miracles such as the dramatic Allied escape at Dunkirk. The unstoppable force of Rommel's AfrikaCorps conquering of North Africa was soon offset by Britain's dramatic victory and El Alamein and General Patton's dogged quest to push Rommel right out of the African continent. These two examples barely scratch the surface of stories in just the European Theater of World War II (Japan's Pacific War is a whole different set of drama and heroics).

Noted historian, Cornelius Ryan, tackles one of the most ambitious, daring, and momentum-shifting operations of the entire war, the massive Allied invasion of France on June 6th, 1944: D-Day! It had been more than four years since the Germans viciously evicted the Allies from the European proper during the brutal conquering of France. It had also been more than two years since the United States had gotten involved in the war. Yet, despite the length of time and numerous operations (including the conquering of Fascist Italy), the Allies had yet to set foot back on Hitler's 'Fortress Europe'. Aside from a failed Canadian invasion attempt to Dieppe some time earlier, no attempt had been made to retake the land and open a second front against Nazi Germany.
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Format: Paperback
Often the term "classic" is thrown around in the literary field without much regard to the real breadth of genre and writings, and is thus cheapened in use. When one describes Cornelius Ryan's "The Longest Day" as a classic piece in the WWII genre believe it. Such a term is NOT hype when used in the same sentence with this book. So many things about the "The Longest Day" make it truly a classic: First, Cornelius Ryan is a Master storyteller. Certainly it helps that Ryan was a war correspondent who experienced life in the combat zones of the ETO! Ryan's writing style is lilting and fun, his writings are easy reads yet full of historical depth. Sure his books are "popular" reading not simply deep academic works, but they ARE important contributions to the historical literature. Second, the story is simply one so compelling that even the best novelist would have a hard time toping. By combining writing talent with a great human story, "The Longest Day" represents literature at its best - in any genre. Third, historical content - the story told in "The Longest Day" - as just mentioned - is so compelling that it need not be, and was not, embellished to make it readable. Ryan has done the hard work of culling documents and interviewing numerous sources to gain factual clarity. Again, it is clear that his time spent as a correspondent helped his fact gathering abilities and thus contributed greatly to the success of this book.Read more ›
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By A Customer on April 29 2004
Format: Paperback
The Longest Day is a non- fiction book by Cornelius Ryan. It is about the Allied invasion of Normandy and the events leading up to it in World War two. The invasion happened on June 6, 1944. An important character in the book is the Colonel of a paratrooper battalion. He is responsible for the training of his battalion and helping them in combat. While he was jumping out of his C-47 near a heavily fortified French town one of his companies landed in the town and they got massacred. The Colonel did not know that and even though he did a vigorous search with a broken ankle he did not find them. So he went on with out him. The Longest Day has a lot of courageous soldiers in it especially on Omaha Beach. Omaha Beach was one of the beaches the Americans landed on. It was defended by an experienced German division and many Americans died. The book is written so that it jumps from one part of the invasion to the other and follows individual soldiers through parts of the battle. The author also is very descriptive. I liked The Longest Day a lot and I think many other people will like it too. I think people 11 or older should read the book because it is sometimes confusing.
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Format: Paperback
This is a fine, fine read that lives up to its reputation as the classic account of D-Day--and also as a truly riveting read. For a treatment of the strategy of which the Normandy landings were a part or for what came after (or, for that matter, before) June 6, 1944, you'll need to look elsewhere, for Ryan focuses on the sixth itself and discusses strategic elements virtually not at all (except for some tangential remarks on Germany's strategy for defending occupied France). But at the level of the soldier on the ground, in the thick of battle, this is great reading.
Ryan breaks his book down into three parts: "The Wait," "The Night," and "The Day." The first part details the day or two before the invasion, during which the tense Allies finally decided that the sixth and not the fifth would be D-Day and during which things worsened for an already unprepared German army (such as Rommel's departure from the front for a visit home). After something of an anti-climax on June 5, when the landings were pushed back a day, events accelerate rapidly. After midnight on June 6 ("The Night"), paratroopers land behind the beaches. The Germans were surprised, but the Allied effort was confused and scattered since many paratroopers missed their drop zones by as much as miles.
Dawn brings even greater surprise to the German leadership in France, most of whom believed the invasion would come at Calais, when they spy the massive invasion force with its thousands of vessels off the coast at Normandy. Americans land in the west at Utah and Omaha, while British and Canadian forces land at Sword, Juno, and Gold in the east. Classic episodes ensue at Utah, where resistance is light and troops under Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., move inland to meet up with airborne soldiers.
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