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The Lord of the Flies (Widescreen) (Sous-titres français) [Import]

3.1 out of 5 stars 103 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Balthazar Getty, Chris Furrh, Danuel Pipoly, James Badge Dale, Andrew Taft
  • Directors: Harry Hook
  • Writers: Jay Presson Allen, William Golding
  • Producers: David V. Lester, Jeffrey Bydalek, Lewis M. Allen, Lewis Newman, Peter Allen
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, DVD-Video, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Fox Video (Canada) Limited
  • Release Date: Nov. 20 2001
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars 103 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B00005O06X
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Product Description

Amazon.ca

Harry Hook's adaptation is not as faithful to the William Golding novel as you'd wish (they excised the Lord of the Flies dialogue with Simon!) and because of it, the movie is less allegorical and less resonant. A group of young men from a military academy are stranded on an island. The group quickly becomes fractious with a passive section led by Ralph, trying to get rescued, and a hunter faction, led by Jack, trying to procure meat and "have fun." Peter Brook's 1963 filming seemed to get closer to the Darwinist sense of this cultural disintegration. Here, the hunter faction seems more like Peter Pan's Lost Boys than the bloodthirsty murderers they are. The performances, particularly young Getty, don't quite carry the weight of the situation. It's still, however, sobering to slowly watch the school uniforms traded for war paint, and the little boys turn into little savages. --Keith Simanton --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
This movie purports to be based on William Golding's Lord of the Flies, a great piece of literature. The makers of this movie must have figured that "based on" meant it would be a good idea to depart from the novel at almost every point it they got it into their heads to do so, with or without (and in their case without) any good reason. In every case it is for the worse, and the final result is a travestry. If you want to see how it should have been done, just watch Peter Hall's black and white version. With a version like that around anyone has to be either very good or very stupid to attempt compete. I leave it to the reader to guess to which category the makers of this movie belong.
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Format: VHS Tape
I saw the movie before I read the book so here is my short review. Overall the movie was nice and sweet, a story about a group of children stranded on an uninhabited island without adult supervision who become savages and lose touch with civilization. The only three who maintain reason are Ralph (the initial leader who tries to always maintain a fire), Simon (the good pure child who suffers a tragic ending, and Piggy (the conscience of the group). The others Jack and his tribe eventually become wild and barbaric with fear of a monster and a primal urge to hunt. The good versus the evil is obviously seen in this movie. However, the symbolic pig's head, the glasses and Simon are dulled down in the movie as opposed to the book. Moreover, Ralph and Jack seem too buddy buddy at first and seem to agree to much and then all of a sudden split apart. The last scene though is the best in the movie. There is a huge fire in the island set by Jack and his tribe as they hunt down for Ralph as they would a pig. The music and the way it was filmed with slowmotion and the perspectives really shocked me and kept me with my breath caught. The ending was too short though and the acting was good. The actors who played Ralph and Jack did a superb job, especially the Ralph actor who is so damned cute and looks a lot like the kid on the cover of the book by Sir William. Simon could have received a bigger role in the movie and the kid who played Piggy was annoying at times but I truly felt bad for him when his glasses fell and he they threw that rock at him that was crazy. So watch the movie it's pretty good and then pick up the book if you haven't read it.
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Format: DVD
After reading the book for English class, the teacher sat us down to watch the film version of the novel. We watched the 1990's version. Although I haven't seen the 1960's one, it probably would have been a better choice. Granted, the movie is gorgeously filmed. The island the boys inhabit is rich in color and vegetation. But of course, looks alone do not make a film. It must have some substance. Perhaps having read the book and rather enjoying it, I have a biased opinion but this film didn't seem to have much to do with the book except share a title, main idea and some character names. Sara Schiff should be ashamed for butchering the tale. Trying to modernize the story may have seemed like a good idea, but it wasn't, it really wasn't. Since the boys are no longer British and no longer living during the WWII era (one mentions 'Alf', seriously folks) and since they are American children who have grown up on video games and now curse like sailors, it is easier to believe that they would revert to savagery. The screenplay has also conviently added an adult on the island and also completely removed the entire scene with Simon and the Lord of the Flies. The young actors cannot be accused of bad acting since almost none of the characters are developed enough to really act. Ralph was watered down, Piggy reminded me of a young Drew Carey. The only characters I had strong feelings for were Jack (hated him) and Simon (loved him). It's just kind of a shame. My advice to you is read the book definately, don't even think about renting it without having read it. If you're interested though, by all means rent it. It's not a horrible film in general, it's just a bad adaptation.
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Format: DVD
I saw this film many years ago and I enjoyed it because I was a teenager and liked Balthazar Getty. Typical, eh? I was prompted to read the novel, and found the story good but ultimately frightening, especially Simon talking with "the Lord of the Flies." I thought it was very weird that this was not in the film since I saw it as the most important part of the story.
Balthazar Getty is so-so (this was his first film, I think) in his performance as Ralph, but the other actors (mostly unknowns who never appeared in any other films, with good reason) fell way short. I was however, still affected by some scenes after viewing the film on Bravo a few weeks ago. It had been years since I'd seen it, and nice to view it with a different perspective. I advise "baltysgirl" below to do the same. I understand the enthusiasm for the film, but this whole story is based on something far more profound than a guy's "pretty face." If you defend its flaws and excessive foul language etc. with that much gusto and also claim to be "balty's girl", it leads others to suspect you've missed the point. Be honest with yourself. If Balty wasn't in it, would you adore it that much?
The best actor in the film I think was Badge Dale as Simon, but I am partial to the Simon character so I could be biased. I thought Chris Furrh (who was, strangely enough in a TV movie made just after this one called "Exile" -- about a group of young people stranded on a deserted island who eventually become savages complete with warpaint and spears) overacted his way through LOTF and seemed more annoying than evil.
Piggy (Daniel somebody) was annoying as well. I agree with the other reviewer who said Piggy was too blubbery and all. I just didn't really feel like the actor believed HE was on this island with this action happening.
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