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The Lost Continent Paperback – Jul 2008

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 108 pages
  • Publisher: Classic Books Library (July 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1600967965
  • ISBN-13: 978-1600967962
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 0.6 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 213 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
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Product Description

Review

"I highly recommend Campfire’s comics. They do what they are intended to do and do it in  a way that excites kids about classic literature."

— Chris Wilson, The Graphic Classroom (a resource for teachers and librarians) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in Chicago in 1875. He took inspiration for many of his stories from the classical mythology and literature he studied in his youth, and from the time he spent at an Idaho ranch set up by his brothers.
The story goes that, while proof reading an advertisement for pencil sharpeners in a pulp magazine, inspiration struck. Looking through various magazines, with their tall tales of adventure, he was motivated to write a fantasy story himself. A Princess of Mars appeared as a novel in 1912, and his career as a professional writer took off. Another phenomenally successful novel was Tarzan of the Apes, published in 1914. The character Tarzan went on to become a legend in his own right. He died on March 19, 1950, having written well over 50 novels. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In "The Lost Continent" (a.k.a. "Beyond Thirty") Edgar Rice Burroughs provides one of his most interesting combinations of adventure and social commentary. The premise behind this alternative history story is that the United States did not get involved in the "Great War" in Europe but instead followed its isolationist tendencies to such an extreme ("The East for the East...The West for the West") that no one from the United States has gone past 30 degrees or 175 degrees latitude for over 160 years, which means no one in America even knows who won the war.
It is now 2137 and a raging storm has thrown the Pan-American aero-submarine "Coldwater" past the 30 degree mark. The damaged vessel under the command of Lt. Jefferson Turck lands in England and German helmet and Felis tigers. In time, the crew will discover what happened to "The Lost Continent" of the Old World. Of course, since this is a ERB novel we know that there will be a damsel in distress for Lt. Turck to save from the great evils that he finds in the Europe that has slipped back into barbarism the way it did after the fall of the Roman Empire.
One of the main strengths of Burroughs was his ability to create ancient civilizations. "The Lost Continent" is actually atypical for Burroughs who usually plunges his heroes into these strange new worlds a lot quicker than what happens in this novel, so this time around there is much more of a sense of mystery to the proceedings. Still, by the last half of the novel we are definitely on familiar and well-trod ground in terms of a ERB adventure story.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9aec3288) out of 5 stars 25 reviews
HASH(0x9aed71e0) out of 5 stars Whatever happened to England? Jan. 15 2014
By HMS Warspite - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Edgar Rice Burroughs' venerable science fiction thriller "The Lost Continent" gets the graphic novel treatment in this Campfire Books edition. The story itself is something different from his other works. It is set in the year 2137. The Western Hemisphere has been united as one nation, protected by a combined military. No one has visited the Eastern Hemisphere since the time of what the reader knows as the First World War. One day, a Pan-American naval vessel gets into mechanical difficulties in mid-Atlantic, leaving behind a handful of sailors in a small craft. The sailors, led by the enterprising Lieutenant Jefferson Turck, reach what used to be England, and find something very surprising there.

"The Lost Continent" is an imaginative riff on what might have happened to a Europe that tore itself to pieces in the First World War, only to fall prey to other, unexpected civilizations. The story is full of wild animals, strange barbarians and stranger societies, a little romance and much adventure. As other reviewers have noted, there is a certain amount of social commentary, which may or may not resonate with the casual reader. It is certainly another fun science fiction read and recommended to Edgar Rice Burroughs' fans.
HASH(0x9aed748c) out of 5 stars The Lost Continent is a perfect break from epic overload. June 13 2015
By B. S. Cheney - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Previously published at TheQwillery.com

I've read Edgar Rice Burrough's Tarzan of the Apes and loved it. I've been eying the Barsoom (John Carter of Mars) series, but then at this year's WonderCon in Anaheim I sat in on a Burrough's panel and they mentioned The Lost Continent and it grabbed my attention. I was happy to find it at my local used book store. It's a short book, but it holds a rich story.

The back cover is a little misleading, so I'll give a quick story recap. The book is what we now refer to as an Alternate History story, which is a sub-genre under the Science Fiction genre. It explores the idea of what would happen if America didn't get involved in Word War I, and, by staying neutral, England, Germany, and most of Eurasia is completely destroyed. In fact, America is so neutral they close off any contact east past the 30th longitude west and west of the 175th longitude west. This isolation lasts for 200 years, making the current year 2137. Jefferson Turck is the captain of an Aero-sub that's on patrol in the Atlantic when a nasty storm leaves his ship with no power, and it drifts past the 30th longitude, which is strictly illegal and in enforced with a death penalty. Turck and a few sailors, after several misfortunes, get separated from their ship and are left with no choice but to take their smaller boat to England in search of aid. Then, the real adventures begin.

Burroughs is a master of creating suspense and giving a sense of wonder to his world. He's able to quickly breathe life into his world and main characters. He has a gift of knowing just how much backstory and personality he needs to give a main character to help the reader connect to them. That being said, all the supporting cast of characters are only names and sex, but I didn't care as I knew they weren't important—in fact, they knew it as well and stayed out of the way, only popping up to deliver bad news or offer minor support. I have to give Burroughs some credit for his female character, Victory. She was a very strong and independent female character for a book that came out in 1916. She still has some of those basic stock issues of being a little helpless at times and needing the love of a strong man, but she does wield a wicked dagger with skill several times, so props to Burroughs.

The story itself was very interesting. Burroughs came up with some great ideas on how a world might look after a devastating war. The story took a couple turns I didn't see coming, and I was drawn into it quickly and stayed invested until the end.

The Lost Continent is a perfect break from epic overload. It makes me wish we still had authors putting out short novels that still held a quality story. I'd recommend this book to youth and adults. There is minor violence, no language and only implied sexual situations. If you're a Burroughs fan, I'd recommend you buy a copy. Otherwise, I recommend you borrow the book from a friend or library. It's the perfect book for fans of Alternate History and anyone who likes a quick adventure.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9aed781c) out of 5 stars Burroughs adds some social commentary to his adventure May 21 2004
By Lawrance Bernabo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In "The Lost Continent" (a.k.a. "Beyond Thirty") Edgar Rice Burroughs provides one of his most interesting combinations of adventure and social commentary. The premise behind this alternative history story is that the United States did not get involved in the "Great War" in Europe but instead followed its isolationist tendencies to such an extreme ("The East for the East...The West for the West") that no one from the United States has gone past 30 degrees or 175 degrees latitude for over 160 years, which means no one in America even knows who won the war.
It is now 2137 and a raging storm has thrown the Pan-American aero-submarine "Coldwater" past the 30 degree mark. The damaged vessel under the command of Lt. Jefferson Turck lands in England and German helmet and Felis tigers. In time, the crew will discover what happened to "The Lost Continent" of the Old World. Of course, since this is a ERB novel we know that there will be a damsel in distress for Lt. Turck to save from the great evils that he finds in the Europe that has slipped back into barbarism the way it did after the fall of the Roman Empire.
One of the main strengths of Burroughs was his ability to create ancient civilizations. "The Lost Continent" is actually atypical for Burroughs who usually plunges his heroes into these strange new worlds a lot quicker than what happens in this novel, so this time around there is much more of a sense of mystery to the proceedings. Still, by the last half of the novel we are definitely on familiar and well-trod ground in terms of a ERB adventure story.
Before World War II Burroughs wrote "Beyond the Farthest Star," about a distant planet that had been at war for centuries and where technological advances in warfare threatened to destroy all life, which makes it the other ERB novel to check out if you are interested in looking at another example of his rare attempts at social commentary. I do not think the payoff is worthy of the set up in "The Lost Continent," but it is intriguing to think that the United States completely cutting all ties with Europe was a viable basis for telling a futuristic adventure.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9aed7948) out of 5 stars Fine genre piece Aug. 31 2007
By wiredweird - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Terra incognita: check.
Savable babe: check.
Treacherous traveling companion: check.
Death cult and/or human sacrifice: check.
Inane romantic misunderstandings: check.
Everything else in the genre's list: check.

This time, "there" is the bizarre and unknown world outside the US. Some poorly-stated conflict divided the world into America (South America included, not that anyone important lives there) and All The Rest. Sabotage and misfortune drive Our Hero et al. outside the ken of civilized people and onto the carnivore-ridden shores of Great Britain, then beyond. Beyond means "where all those guys who aren't Anglo-colored live."

The story has passed its 90th birthday, so WWI was fresh in mind for the original reader. Burroughs knew that US isolationism was a dream or nightmare on many minds, as it is when I write this. He played and preyed on that to create the setting for his next pot-boiler.

But he did it really well. Also known as "Beyond Thirty" (the thirtieth line of longitude), this historical artifact carries all the distressing prejudices and jingoistic assumptions of its time. A modern reader might like this best if it's read at arm's length. You'll want to taste all the racist and implicitly imperialist culture of the time, but not swallow. We're not perfect these days, but it's nice to know that we're doing a damm lot better.

-- wiredweird
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9aed7b7c) out of 5 stars Burroughs adds social commentary to his pulp fiction yarn Aug. 7 2004
By Lawrance Bernabo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In "The Lost Continent" (a.k.a. "Beyond Thirty") Edgar Rice Burroughs provides an interesting combination of adventure and social commentary. The premise behind this novel is that the United States did not get involved in the "Great War" in Europe but instead followed its isolationist tendencies to such an extreme ("The East for the East...The West for the West") that no one from the United States has gone past 30 degrees or 175 degrees latitude for over 160 years. It is now 2137 and a raging storm has thrown the Pan-American aero-submarine "Coldwater" past the 30 degree mark. The damaged vessel under the command of Lt. Jefferson Turck lands in England and German helmet and Felis tigers. In time, the crew will discover what happened to "The Lost Continent" of the Old World. Of course, since this is a ERB novel we know that there will be a damsel in distress for Lt. Turck to save from the great evils that he finds.

One of the main strengths of Burroughs was his ability to create ancient civilizations. "The Lost Continent" is actually atypical for Burroughs who usually plunges his heroes into these strange new worlds a lot quicker than what happens in this novel, so this time around there is much more of a sense of mystery to the proceedings. Still, by the last half of the novel we are definitely on familiar and well-trod ground in terms of a ERB adventure story. Before World War II Burroughs wrote "Beyond the Farthest Star," about a distant planet that had been at war for centuries and where technological advances in warfare threatened to destroy all life, which makes it the other ERB novel to check out if you are interested in looking at another example of his rare attempts at social commentary. I do not think the payoff is worthy of the set up in "The Lost Continent," but it is intriguing to think that the United States completely cutting all ties with Europe was a viable basis for telling a futuristic adventure.

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