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Macbeth Paperback – Mar 1 2005

4.3 out of 5 stars 117 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Barron's Educational Series (March 1 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0764131400
  • ISBN-13: 978-0764131400
  • Product Dimensions: 19 x 0.5 x 24.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 222 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 117 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #510,712 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From School Library Journal

Grade 7 Up–Each book includes a brief introduction to the play, followed by an illustrated cast of characters and a glossary of literary terms. Annotated text from the play alternates with black-and-white illustrations of selected scenes, in the style of a graphic novel. It is unclear why the editors did not make these true graphic novels throughout. The black-and-white comic art is undistinguished, and as most of it simply depicts two characters in conversation, it does little to clarify what is going on. The first two plays in particular offer marvelous possibilities for the illustrator, so the ho-hum comics are disappointing. Think about it boxes contain study questions such as, What has worried Macbeth? and boxed Literary terms give examples like, ‘Hermia...Hermia...Helena...' is...alliteration. Teacher's guides accompany the books. Those interested in a graphic-novel interpretation might want to consider Arthur Byron Cover's Macbeth (Puffin, 2005), which is illustrated in manga style and would probably appeal more to reluctant readers. These titles might be useful for teaching Shakespeare to reluctant readers, but a better choice might be a simple annotated Shakespeare such as a Sparknotes No Fear Shakespeare series (Spark), supplemented by Bruce Coville's William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet (1999) and William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night (2003, both Penguin), which are picture-book prose adaptations, or Adam McKeown's Romeo and Juliet: Young Reader's Shakespeare (Sterling, 2004).–Kathleen E. Gruver, Burlington County Library, Westampton, NJ
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From the Publisher

Are you frustrated by obscure words and unidiomatic phrases in Shakespeare's plays? The new "Access to Shakespeare" series removes the mystery, not the magic, from MACBETH, and makes reading or studying a breeze. This translation of MACBETH into contemporary English -- alongside the original text -- has modernized the difficult passages and expressions which used to make Shakespeare's language such heavy weather.

This unique translation is NOT a literal-minded prose version. It retains the feel and the rhythm of the original, letting you experience the play in the same enjoyable way an Elizabethan audience did. The text is immediately clear to today's readers, making those tedious footnotes unnecessary. You'll find easy-to-follow line numbering, and a glossary of place names and mythological references.

Are you a high school or junior-college student working on an assignment? Do you wish to preview the play before a performance, or are you perhaps learning English as a Second Language? This translation is ideal for you. You will never again hesitate to read THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH because you're mystified by such lines as, "... keep my bosom franchised." The facing page of this edition of MACBETH makes clear what Shakespeare meant, "... keep my conscience free."

The translation reads like a modern book and it's fascinating. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Even though the text in this particular book is available online, this side by side Elizabethan English and modern English translation of Macbeth is well worth owning. Aside from the extremely well-done translations of the old text, there are excellent explanations of what some of the lines are about. Most, as in 90% of students in high school, will struggle with Shakespearean plays, so this guide and definitive translation is a welcome addition to tools students can use to not only survive but also thrive in their English/Literature class. Obviously, for English majors, Shakespeare will also reappear in post secondary institutions, so again, this guide/translation may come to the rescue.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm not rating Macbeth, of course. It's a great play. What I'm rating is this edition of the text.

This is a good one. So far as I can see, the difference between good and bad eEditions of Shakespeare is first and foremost a question of whether the lines of the poetry have been preserved. Not all editions do this, which leaves the reader with a weird mishmash of paragraphs with capital letters sprinkled throughout the text. This approach - let's call it the Approach of Sloth - leaves a text that's unreadable.

But this text is fine. It's a safe choice.
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Format: Paperback
Macbeth by the great William Shakespeare is such a stupid book, when you really think about it. I remember being young, asking my parents who Shakespeare is, and later asking if his plays were interesting, in their opinions. My dad liked Hamlet, but no one ever said anything about Macbeth. And then I discovered that I would be reading it for English class in tenth grade, and they both admitted that it's dumb. I didn't believe them, because Shakespeare is one of my favourite writers and I love the way he plays with words. And then I actually read this interesting story about greed and pride, and I discovered that they were completely right. Being a tragedy and all, we readers could immediately understand what to expect with this story: Macbeth is a tragic hero, therefore he dies, and others will die too, because of his great tragic flaw. It couldn't have been more dumber—but I was intrigued by this stupidity and the predictability of this great play. In the end, I must say that it was seriously great.

Many people have issues enjoying/reading books that are required for them to read because of school. I rarely have had that issue, because I find that my English teachers are doing a good job with choosing books for the curriculum that people my age would actually enjoy/relate to. Macbeth isn't totally relatable, as we don't live in a period of time where Canada/America has a king or queen, but we always do undergo these phases of greed or jealousy. This tragic play by Shakespeare explores supernatural aspects in the midst of a time setting of royalty and power in Scotland.

"See, see, our honour'd hostess.—The love that follows us sometime is our trouble, which still we thank as love.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
i am beyond please with this book. i was having a hard time with the original writings but this made it easier to understand and appreciate the writings of Shakespeare. i recommend the no fear versions to anyone that struggles with anything written in old english.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For $5, this is a pretty good find, but if you are not already well-versed in Shakespearean English, or you are purchasing this version to use with a class of students, don't bother. It lacks the helpful footnotes offered in other versions - this copy has a few supplementary notes for each page, but other versions have WAY more explanations and details, making them much easier and more enjoyable to read. Opt for an Oxford copy.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I used this as a companion to the script in the rehearsal for a professional theatre production. Very helpful and informative during those times when actors and the director need a boost. Easy to understand and very relatable.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have read "The Scottish Play," a few times, but wanted a Kindle version. This was a great choice. Included with the play, are papers explaining different aspects, vocabulary and even suggestions for reading it- in iambicpentameter.
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on April 30 2011
Format: Paperback
In the theater, people apparently don't call Shakespeare's "Macbeth" by its actual name -- it's usually called "MacB" or "The Scottish Play." The dark superstitions that hover around this play really show its power: it's a harrowing portrait of a weak man who spirals into a personal hell of ambition, murder and madness.

Shortly after a victory in battle, Macbeth and his friend Banquo are traveling home across a heath when they encounter three witches -- who greet him with "All hail, Macbeth! hail to thee, Thane of Cawdor! All hail, Macbeth! that shalt be king hereafter!"

When MacBeth is made Thane of Cawdor, he naturally begins to think that being king might be next in line. And when King Duncan visits his castle, Lady MacBeth goads her husband into murdering the king and framing a couple of innocent servants for the deed. As the witches predicted, MacBeth becomes king of Scotland.

But the witches also prophesied that Banquo would be the father of kings, so MacBeth starts tying off loose ends by hiring assassins to kill Banquo and his young son, as well as a wily thane named MacDuff and all of his family. But though MacBeth believes himself to be safe from everyone, his fear begins to grow as madness and guilt torment him and his wife...

One of the most fascinating things about "Macbeth" is how evil it is -- mass murder, insanity, bloody ghosts, a trio of manipulative witches pulling MacBeth's strings, and a nice if weak man who becomes a raving murderous paranoiac. Shakespeare starts the story on a dark note, and it gets darker and bloodier as the story winds on to its bleak climax.

In fact, the entire story is a two-part spiral -- things get tighter and more intense, even as MacBeth and Lady M. get crazier and more violent.
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