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Martin [Import]

4.5 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews

Sale: CDN$ 126.06
Only 1 left in stock - order soon.
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Product Details

  • Format: Dolby, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Lions Gate
  • Release Date: Nov. 9 2004
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B0004Z33E6
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Product Description

Amazon.ca

Martin (John Amplas) is a modern sort of vampire--he gains his victims' cooperation with the use of a hypodermic needle instead of hypnotism, and uses razors in the place of fangs. "There's no real magic," he says. "There's no real magic, ever." He says this to his elderly Romanian cousin, Tati Cuda (Lincoln Maazel), a true believer in the old religion, and self-appointed keeper of Martin, who threatens to do away with the boy if the vampirism doesn't stop. According to Cuda, the boy is actually 85 years old--young for a vampire. Truly, the supernatural element of the film is always at odds with psychological explanations that make Martin out to be a sexually disturbed teen, not an ancient bloodsucker. Martin's vampiric episodes are intercut with sepia footage of similar exploits from some gothic era, which may either be Martin's memories or his imagination; take your pick. Garlic, sunlight, mirrors--these are devices of Hollywood, and have no effect on a hypo-toting vampire like Martin, as he explains the rules in his role of frequent call-in guest on a radio talk show where he's known as "The Count." These ambiguities are left teasingly unresolved by the film, which is more interested in establishing the relationship between the traditional vampire and the modern-day psycho. Along with the film's narrative economy, these ambiguities make Martin Romero's midnight-movie masterpiece.

At the very end Romero borrows an image from Carl Theodore Dreyer's classic silent film Ordet, ratifying a moment of religious ritual. Knowing this as you watch the film only deepens the chill. --Jim Gay --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: VHS Tape
MARTIN is a very disturbing film directed by the creator of "The Living Dead" series, George Romero.
John Amplas plays the character of Martin, who may or may not be a vampire. He moves to a poor, dying steel town in Pennsylvania to live with is relative Tata Cuda (Lincoln Maazel). Cuda believes him to be a vampire & has vowed to destroy him to save his soul. Martin works around Cida's store while trying to fit in society. The only ones who treat him fairly is his cousin Christine & an older woman who he has sexual relations with. All the while, Martin seeks out victims to satisfy his sick bloodlust.
This is a forgotten classic that is tragically overlooked by horror film fans. The viewer is left to decide whether Martin is indeed a vampire or a very disturbed young man. What makes this film very disturbing is that he shares a lot of the deranged traits of serial killers. The other thing that makes this film very disturbing is that the storyline itself is very POSSIBLE. With a lot of serial murderers out there who has the same characteristics as Martin has, it's easy to feel uneasy while watching this film.
This is Romero's most personal film. He shot this film on 16 mm, hired unknown actors to make this film on the cheap & delivered a very disturbing horror film. Martin, without the extreme horror, could very well be a teen age film that deals with the everyday angst of being a teen.
Very well done, MARTIN is gem!
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Format: VHS Tape
.... I thought I would very easily be able to write it off as just another campy '70's horror movie~but i soon realized it was much more. I have been a life long horror film fan, and i love a good cheesy horror movie almost as much as a truly frightening one. And i confess, I thought i would be able to put "Martin" into the first catagory. But by the end of the first 15mins, i realized it was something a lot more.
I can honestly say i have never seen anything quite like "Martin" before. The opening sequence where Martin claims his victim on a train in the dead of night, is truly disturbing. The entire film gave me a very uneasy feeling~hard to explain really, but then it's a rare thing for a horror film to actually leave an impression on me. I have just seen so many, that i guess i have become jaded to it all. But every once in a while i see a movie that gives me the hibbie-jeebies~and Martin was definitely one of those movies. This movie left me thinking about what i had just seen, long after it was over.
I will say that i found some of the dialogue not only written, but delivered in a more then slightly campy manner~having said that, i think that John Amplas was perfect for the role, and can not picture anyone else being able to pull it off so well.
I guess the most intriguing part of the film, is trying to figure out if Martin truly is a vampire, or just a frighteningly disturbed young man~and i think that leaving the question unanswered is part of the reason i found the movie so unnerving. Not to mention the ending which was both shocking and tragicly sad. And just the mere fact that you actually come to care about a character like Martin, after everything you see him do during the course of the film, is probably the most disturbing thing of all.
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Format: VHS Tape
George A. Romero's "Martin" is a nearly perfect film. While firmly rooted in the postmodern, "Martin" also gives the attentive viewer a good idea of how vampire myths may have originated; with the hysterical superstitions of old Europe trying to come to grips with a serial murderer like the eponymous Martin, played convincingly and sympathetically by John Amplas. Filmed in an economically depressed steel town in Pennsylvania, this film echoes "Nosferatu" (1922) in its depiction of a moribund city devoid of youth and life. Shot in 16mm, "Martin" is strangely beautiful, and a perfect visual documentation of the mid-1970s. Amplas makes one of the most memorable vampire protagonists in the history of film. Even in a tight yellow t-shirt, blue jeans, and tennis shoes, he exhibits as much sinister grace as Christopher Lee, Delphine Seyrig, or Max Schreck. "Martin" is easily one of the best and most strangely moving vampire films of all time.
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Format: VHS Tape
Over his career Romero has offered some films which were merely good ("The Crazies", "The Dark Half"), and then there have been those that are truly great. "Martin" is one of those. Like Romero's other masterpieces it has a lot of social commentary and delves into what it is that makes out society go off. Who are the real monsters? John Amplas, in his first role, is perfeclty cast as the quiet, haunting figure of Martin, who may or may not be an 84 year old vampire. Since he has no fangs, he has to resort to drugging his victims and using a razor blade. Slow moving, but never boring, and Romero uses beautiful location shots of the city (not sure what one) in the background of the photography. Kudos to Romero, to Amplas, and everyone else involved in this, it's a rare treat. The ending is unexpected and will leave you thinking for quite a while. Check it now.
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Format: VHS Tape
Romero has always been somewhat of an oddity in the realm of horror. He manages to squeeze so much into his films that the viewer almost HAS to watch his movie over and over to get it all. Martin is one of those films. Hidden behind his frantic editing, long tracking shots, and remarkably refrained violence is a stong tale of conformity, abandonment, and religious persecution all entered around a 17 year old boy named Martin who thinks he is a vampire. Whether or not Martin is in actuality a vampire is left up to the viewer to decide. He certainly thinks he is, though. Without fangs, he must resort to razor blades to draw blood, a plot device that sets up some rather humorous and well-directed scenes. Early FX work by Tom Savini takes backseat though to Romero's own direction, which is deft and stylish. A great piece of genre work.
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