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Mechanics of Material (Asia Adaptation) Paperback – Jun 3 2009

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 816 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education / Asia; 5 edition (June 3 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071284222
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071284226
  • Product Dimensions: 20 x 3.8 x 25.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #417,774 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

About the Author

Born in France and educated in France and Switzerland, Ferd held an M.S. degree from the Sorbonne and an Sc.D. degree in theoretical mechanics from the University of Geneva. He came to the United States after serving in the French army during the early part of World War II and had taught for four years at Williams College in the Williams-MIT joint arts and engineering program. Following his service at Williams College, Ferd joined the faculty of Lehigh University where he taught for thirty-seven years. He held several positions, including the University Distinguished Professors Chair and Chairman of the Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics Department, and in 1995 Ferd was awarded an honorary Doctor of Engineering degree by Lehigh University. 



David holds a B.S. degree in ocean engineering and a M.S. degree in civil engineering from the Florida Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. degree in civil engineering from the University of Connecticut.  He was employed by General Dynamics Corporation Electric Boat Division for five years, where he provided submarine construction support and conducted engineering design and analysis associated with pressure hull and other structures.  In addition, he conducted research in the area of noise and vibration transmission reduction in submarines.  He then taught at Lafayette College for one year prior to joining the civil engineering faculty at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, where he has been since 1990.  David is currently a member of the American Railway Engineering & Maintenance-of-way Association Committee 15 (Steel Structures), and the American Society of Civil Engineers Committee on Blast, Shock, and Vibratory Effects.  He has also worked with the Federal Railroad Administration on their bridge inspection training program.  Professional interests include bridge engineering, railroad engineering, tall towers, structural forensics, and blast-resistant design.  He is a licensed professional engineer in Connecticut and Pennsylvania.



Born in Philadelphia, Russ holds a B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Delaware and an Sc.D. degree in the field of structural engineering from The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He taught at Lehigh University and Worchester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) before joining the faculty of the University of Connecticut where he held the position of Chairman of the Civil Engineering Department and taught for twenty-six years. In 1991 Russ received the Outstanding Civil Engineer Award from the Connecticut Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers.



John T. DeWolf, Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Connecticut, joined the Beer and Johnston team as an author on the second edition of Mechanics of Materials.  John holds a B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Hawaii and M.E. and Ph.D. degrees in structural engineering from Cornell University.  His research interests are in the area of elastic stability, bridge monitoring, and structural analysis and design.  He is a registered Professional Engineer and a member of the Connecticut Board of Professional Engineers.  He was selected as the University of Connecticut Teaching Fellow in 2006.


Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This book has a lot of interesting questions, but does not really delve into giving detailed procedures for getting answers. In the practice exercises, it skips a bunch of steps, assuming that the reader would already know what to do. At other points in the book, they painstakingly go through simple concepts. This was frustrating situation at times, which was exacerbated by having an incompetent professor. In the end, this book saved my hide by having good pictures and somewhat straightfoward approaches to mechanics problems. Also, the answers in the back of the book are a HUGE help. From them, you can usually identify a stupid mistake in your answer which could be the result of too many or too few zeros.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ordering from South Africa,i was amazed at the efficient delivery but most of the all the book condition exceeded my expectations.i've been ordering from Amazon over the years but this one is the most impressive i've had yet. it has motivated me to make a review for the first time on this website..
keep up the excellent work
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Format: Hardcover
This books is the only rival of the Hibbeler's book.It has full SI editions and it contains clear examples.It handles the concepts clearly and in detail. It is strongly recommended to engineering students to obtain this book with Hibbelers one.
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By A Customer on April 16 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is really a great book in a hard to grasp subject.It is easy to follow ,has a lot of excellent sample problems and examples ,sudent-friendly and it is ideal for selfstudy.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9b9694a4) out of 5 stars 93 reviews
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9b8c8330) out of 5 stars Poor answer key Feb. 8 2006
By Michael Ploof - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The book explained the concepts of the subject well enough, but the number of typos in the problems and in the answer key led to many hours of frustration. I was often under the impression I was doing something wrong, only to find out the givens in a problem had incorrect prefixes, or some other error.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9b8c8384) out of 5 stars Solid exercise book Jan. 24 2003
By Kevin Reza Aroom - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book has a lot of interesting questions, but does not really delve into giving detailed procedures for getting answers. In the practice exercises, it skips a bunch of steps, assuming that the reader would already know what to do. At other points in the book, they painstakingly go through simple concepts. This was frustrating situation at times, which was exacerbated by having an incompetent professor. In the end, this book saved my hide by having good pictures and somewhat straightfoward approaches to mechanics problems. Also, the answers in the back of the book are a HUGE help. From them, you can usually identify a stupid mistake in your answer which could be the result of too many or too few zeros.
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9b8c87bc) out of 5 stars Another overpriced unnecessary edition ... Feb. 14 2009
By calvinnme - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
...and STILL the answer key is wrong. From the Wikipedia:
"In materials science, the strength of a material refers to the material's ability to withstand an applied stress without failure. Yield strength refers to the point on the engineering stress-strain curve (as opposed to true stress-strain curve) beyond which the material begins deformation that cannot be reversed upon removal of the loading. Ultimate strength refers to the point on the engineering stress-strain curve corresponding to the maximum stress."

The last edition of this book was in 2005. What exactly in the above definition of this subject matter has changed in the last four years? Are our bridges in danger of breaking into pieces and floating into space? Or perhaps the authors have lost a great deal in the stock market and picking the pockets of students who had a great supply of affordable used fourth editions was the solution to the authors' problems?

I used this book in one of its much earlier incarnations (early 90's) for a class, and it was wonderfully written. The prose was clear, the examples to the point, and the illustrations were entirely adequate. However, that was the second or so edition, and the answer key was still wrong back then. I compared the fourth edition of this book to my stepson's fifth edition, and I have to say, what is the point? The sections have been rearranged as have the questions, and it appears some of the errors in previous editions are gone, but new ones have popped up, in some cases to problems that have been in this book for years but have just been put in a different place in the book.

If this book was about the underlying subject of material science aimed at seniors or graduate students, well that subject changes quickly. However, this is a book aimed at college sophomores, and the underlying calculations have not changed. I really loved studying this subject with my second edition. Since that edition was sufficient in 1992, I don't know why three more editions with no more room for improvement with the exception of the answer key which has still not been fixed is necessary for anything but the publisher's bottom line.
16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9b8c87a4) out of 5 stars What A Wonderful Book!! Oct. 11 2001
By Muhammad A. AlMubarak - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I feel very comfortable recommending this splendid book to aerospace, civil, mechanical, and material engineering students. So far, this book has helped me a lot in 3 courses. Theses courses are CE 203 structural mechanics, AE 328 aircraft structures, and ME 471 mechanical metallurgy.
I have admired this book for the following reasons:
1-It has made me interested in my courses
2-It is very easy indeed to comprehend
3-It uses simple examples to explain the concepts
4-Key formulas are shaded
5-It has a good number of solved problems
6-It has a summary at the end of each chapter
7-Answers to even-numbered questions are provided at the end of this book
8-In case that you forget some basic ideas in your CE 201 (Statics), Appendix A of this book gives excellent review in calculating the moments of areas
I am sure that you will find it very useful.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9b8c8c60) out of 5 stars vauge and confusing Jan. 22 2009
By Sara H - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
this book talks about theories and derivations of formulas but has nothing about the application, its worded in a confusing jargon and while it may make sense to professors who have extensive knowledge in the field, fo students its confusing and the example problems are poorly explained and irrelevant to the practice problems. There are also tons of typos.


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