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Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Thesaurus, Second Edition Hardcover – Aug 24 2009

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1200 pages
  • Publisher: Merriam-Webster Inc.; 2 edition (Aug. 24 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0877792690
  • ISBN-13: 978-0877792697
  • Product Dimensions: 18.8 x 4.6 x 25.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #309,313 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

About the Author

Since 1937. Merriam-Webster is America's foremost publisher of language-related reference works. The company publishes a diverse array of print and electronic products, including Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary, Eleventh Edition – America's best-selling desk dictionary – and Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged. Merriam-Webster can be considered the direct lexicographical heir of Noah Webster. In 1843, the company bought the rights to the 1841 edition of Webster's magnum opus, An American Dictionary of the English Language, Corrected and Enlarged. At the same time, they secured the rights to create revised editions of the work. Since that time, Merriam-Webster editors have carried forward Noah Webster's work, creating some of the most widely used and respected dictionaries and reference books in the world. 

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Format: Hardcover
Most other dictionary-format thesauri (Roget’s II, for instance) simply won’t give you what you want on the first try. If, for instance, you want a more decorous word for “smelly” you’re brusquely told to “see MALODOROUS”. This means that most of the words you are likely to be looking up require a time-wasting two step process: first find the word you want to replace, then find the main entry for that concept. By the time you’ve finished flipping back and forth through the pages you’ve forgotten what it is your looking for.
The Webster’s version is a thousand times more convenient. If you look up a specific word you’re guaranteed to find about a dozen or so of the most common synonyms right there (funky, stinky, rank, etc.). This first entry is probably all you’ll need and it constitutes the main time-saving benefit of this edition. But there’s more. The real verbomaniacs among us get referred to the main entry of the concept. Here you’ll find the mother lode of words, often numbering into the dozens and ranging from the most commonplace to the ridiculously obscure (e.g. mephitic, olid, or stenchful). You’ll also find related terms (vile, rotten, pestilential), contrasting terms (deoderized, fresh, clean), and antonyms (fragrent, sweet) all in the same place, just as you would in Roget’s conceptually arranged International edition. Like I said, most writers are sure to find what they need on the first try.
The only other thesaurus that approaches this one is the Random House Collegiate, but I don’t think that one has definitions; this one does. I’m also pretty sure this one has more words than Random House, Roget’s 21st Century, or any other. It’s [inexpensive] for a hardcover, too,..., so how can you lose?
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Format: Hardcover
Most other dictionary-format thesauri (Roget’s II, for instance) simply won’t give you what you want on the first try. If, for instance, you want a more decorous word for “smelly” you’re brusquely told to “see MALODOROUS”. This means that most of the words you are likely to be looking up require a time-wasting two step process: first find the word you want to replace, then find the main entry for that concept. By the time you’ve finished flipping back and forth through the pages you’ve forgotten what it is your looking for.
The Webster’s version is a thousand times more convenient. If you look up a specific word you’re guaranteed to find about a dozen or so of the most common synonyms right there (funky, stinky, rank, etc.). This first entry is probably all you’ll need and it constitutes the main time-saving benefit of this edition. But there’s more. The real verbomaniacs among us get referred to the main entry of the concept. Here you’ll find the mother lode of words, often numbering into the dozens and ranging from the most commonplace to the ridiculously obscure (e.g. mephitic, olid, or stenchful). You’ll also find related terms (vile, rotten, pestilential), contrasting terms (deoderized, fresh, clean), and antonyms (fragrent, sweet) all in the same place, just as you would in Roget’s conceptually arranged International edition. Like I said, most writers are sure to find what they need on the first try.
The only other thesaurus that approaches this one is the Random House Collegiate, but I don’t think that one has definitions; this one does. I’m also pretty sure this one has more words than Random House, Roget’s 21st Century, or any other.
(I’m glad the guy below got to know thesaurus.)
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Format: Hardcover
This will do if you only use a thesaurus occasionally but it won't do for the rest of us. The usually superlative Merriam-Webster product line missed the beat with this one. Although Roget's is a bit more time consuming to use, it is infinitely more rewarding than this volume. I was very disappointed at the small number of synonyms found for each entry in Merriam. In Roget, you can easily find many words that differ by only the slightest and most subtle shade of meaning. In this book, if it isn't an exact match, you won't know about it. I also saw no point to including antonyms in a thesaurus. I would have preferred many more synonyms included in the space used for antonyms.
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By A Customer on May 19 2000
Format: Hardcover
If you want to take GRE GMAT or want to know thesaurus, it is.
AND It is cheaper than other books
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9fc9cbe8) out of 5 stars 115 reviews
110 of 117 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9fcb38b8) out of 5 stars The best single tool to improve your writing July 7 2001
By Brian - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Most other dictionary-format thesauri (Roget's II, for instance) simply won't give you what you want on the first try. If, for instance, you want a more decorous word for "smelly", you're brusquely told to "see MALODOROUS". This means that most of the words you are likely to be looking up require a time-wasting two step process: first find the word you want to replace, then find the main entry for that concept. By the time you've finished flipping back and forth through the pages you've forgotten what it is your looking for.

The Webster's version is a thousand times more convenient. If you look up a specific word, you're guaranteed to find about a dozen or so of the most common synonyms right there (funky, stinky, rank, etc.). This first entry is probably all you'll need, and it constitutes the main time-saving benefit of this edition. But there's more. The real verbomaniacs among us get referred to the main entry of the concept. Here you'll find the mother lode of words, often numbering into the dozens and ranging from the most commonplace to the ridiculously obscure (e.g. mephitic, olid, stenchful). You'll also find related terms (vile, rotten, pestilential), contrasting terms (fresh, clean, deoderized), and antonyms (fragrent, sweet) all in the same place, just as you would in Roget's conceptually arranged International edition. Like I said, most writers are sure to find what they need on the first try.

The only other thesaurus that approaches this one is the Random House Collegiate, but I don't think that one has definitions; this one does. I'm also pretty sure this one has more words than Random House, Roget's 21st Century, or any other. It's also inexpensive for a hardcover, so how can you lose?
47 of 47 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9fcb390c) out of 5 stars Excellent searchable thesaurus for Kindle April 17 2011
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This thesaurus, unlike some of the other thesauri available for Kindle, is fully searchable. The search feature works in much the same way as the default dictionary, and I think it's well worth the reasonable price.

The entries are comprehensive with many Synonyms and Related Words provided, as well as Antonyms and Near Antonyms.

I won't compare this thesaurus to other thesauri in print version, but I will say that it's the best thesaurus for Kindle at the time of writing this review. Roget's Super Thesaurus (Kindle Edition), for example, has excellent entries with long lists of synonyms, however it is not searchable and the format appears somewhat cluttered when viewed on the Kindle.

After reading through various user reviews and testing sample content, I finally had narrowed down my choice to either Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Thesaurus or WordNet 3 (largest English dictionary and thesaurus). However by comparing the sample content my decision quickly became obvious. WordNet 3 is also searchable and has the added advantage of making all Synonyms links to their main entries. However, it has very lack-lustre lists of Synonyms, and according to some of the other reader reviews, relatively common words missing entirely.

At any rate I am pleased with this thesaurus and would happily recommend to anybody who is looking for a thesaurus on their Kindle.
85 of 93 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9fcb3be8) out of 5 stars Merriam-Webster disappoints for once March 28 2002
By Ingles - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This will do if you only use a thesaurus occasionally but it won't do for the rest of us. The usually superlative Merriam-Webster product line missed the beat with this one. Although Roget's is a bit more time consuming to use, it is infinitely more rewarding than this volume. I was very disappointed at the small number of synonyms found for each entry in Merriam. In Roget, you can easily find many words that differ by only the slightest and most subtle shade of meaning. In this book, if it isn't an exact match, you won't know about it. I also saw no point to including antonyms in a thesaurus. I would have preferred many more synonyms included in the space used for antonyms.
30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9fcb3ae0) out of 5 stars Best Kindle Thesaurus April 10 2011
By Christopher Lee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In my youth, a thesaurus was a paper book organized like a dictionary. Under each word, listed alphabetically, was a listing of synonyms and antonyms. Seems like a candidate for quick and easy (and useful) reference on a lightweight Kindle.

I found the Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases (2011) was disappointing. It's trying to connect your query word to a "cloud of similar meaning." Confusing. Sometimes I look for a work by searching the antonym list - gotta have that!

This Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Thesaurus works the way I expect. You locate a word within the reference just as you would for the built-in dictionary; simply type the word, then use the five-way selector to pick your target word as the search list changes in-step with your typing. The word entries provide the contents as I would expect from my old paper Thesaurus. For example, entry for "simple" links to seven other entries covering seven different way you might use it. The "simple" entry includes a brief description for each variation, and a hyperlink to the corresponding enumeration of synonyms, related words, antonyms and near antonyms. So far as I can tell, no other thesaurus for the Kindle is easier to use or offers better content.
35 of 37 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9fcb3ccc) out of 5 stars disappointed Sept. 13 2005
By Major Tom - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Having used and liked my friend's Roget's 4th Edition Thesaurus, I wanted one of my own. But apparently, Roget's changed the format after the 4th Edition. Rather than get the latest Roget's (6th Edition?), which several buyers didn't like, I went for the Merriam-Webster. For one, it boasted over 60,000 more entries than Roget's. And, it was supposidely easier to use. Well, I've barely used it and I'm really disappointed. Several words I consider fairly common weren't even there! For example, look up "anomaly" in Roget's and you get 5 catagories, each with numerous word-choices. In Merriam-Webster "anomaly" isn't even there!! Neither is "vested". I'm sure there are dozens more. I wish I could return it, but it is 2-weeks past the 30-day limit.


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