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Midnight in Paris / Minuit à Paris (Bilingual) [Blu-ray] (2011)

4.3 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Kathy Bates, Adrien Brody, Marion Cotillard, Carla Bruni, Rachel McAdams
  • Directors: Woody Allen
  • Producers: Letty Aronson, Stephen Tenenbaum, Jaume Roures
  • Format: Subtitled, NTSC, Anamorphic, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: French, English, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : Parental Guidance (PG)
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • Release Date: Dec 20 2011
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B005OI1QGU
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #10,751 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Product Description

Product Description

This is a romantic comedy set in Paris about a family that goes there because of business, and two young people who are engaged to be married in the fall have experiences there that change their lives. It's about a young man's great love for a city, Paris, and the illusion people have that a life different from theirs would be much better.

Amazon.ca

Paris is a city that lends itself to daydreaming, to walking the streets and imagining all sorts of magic, a quality that Woody Allen understands perfectly. Midnight in Paris is Allen's charming reverie about just that quality, with a screenwriter hero named Gil (Owen Wilson) who strolls the lanes of Paris with his head in the clouds and walks right into his own best fantasy. Gil is there with his materialistic fiancée (Rachel McAdams) and her unpleasant parents, taking a break from his financially rewarding but spiritually unfulfilling Hollywood career--and he can't stop thinking that all he wants to do is quit the movies, move to Paris, and write that novel he's been meaning to finish. You know, be like his heroes in the bohemian Paris of the 1920s. Sure enough, a midnight encounter draws him into the jazzy world of Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Picasso and Dali, and an intense Ernest Hemingway, who promises to bring Gil's manuscript to Gertrude Stein for review. Gil wakes up every morning back in the real world, but returning to his enchanted Paris proves fairly easy. In the execution of this marvelous fantasia, Allen pursues the idea that people of every generation have always romanticized a previous age as golden (this is in fact explained to us by Michael Sheen's pedantic art expert), but he also honors Gil's need to find out certain truths for himself. The movie's on the side of gentle fantasy, and it has some literary/cinematic in-jokes that call back to the kind of goofy humor Allen created in Love and Death.The film is guilty of the slackness that Allen's latter-day directing has sometimes shown, and the underwritten roles for McAdams and Marion Cotillard are better acted than written. But the city glows with Allen's romantic sense of it, and Owen Wilson has just the right nice-guy melancholy to put the idea over. A worthy entry in the Cinema of the Daydream. --Robert Horton

Gil et Inez sont deux jeunes fiancés américains préparant leur mariage. Ils passent quelques jours à Paris, accompagnant les parents d'Inez venus en France pour affaires. Alors que Gil est sous le charme de la capitale française et envisage de s'y installer, ni sa promise, ni ses futurs beaux-parents ne l'apprécient outre mesure. La rencontre inopinée avec un autre couple américain dont le mari est un ancien flirt d'Inez, suffisant et imbuvable, va contribuer à éloigner un peu plus les jeunes fiancés. Gil parcourt la ville à la recherche de l'inspiration pour son prochain roman et, alors que les douze coups de minuit ont sonné, il est invité à monter dans une vieille voiture qui va l'emporter vers le Paris des années 1920. Au fil des nuits, il va alors rencontrer Zelda et F. Scott Fitzgerald, Cole Porter, Ernest Hemingway, Juan Belmonte, Gertrude Stein, Pablo Picasso, T. S. Eliot, Salvador Dalí, Luis Buñuel, Man Ray, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri Matisse… Il va peu à peu tomber amoureux d'Adriana, qui est alors l'égérie de Picasso après avoir été celle de Modigliani. Pourtant celle-ci ne rêve que du Paris et du Maxim's de la Belle Époque, où ils finissent par se retrouver tous deux et où Adriana restera. Gil se séparera d'Inez et restera à Paris, où il rencontrera une jeune contemporaine aimant comme lui la ville sous la pluie.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By K. Gordon TOP 100 REVIEWER on Nov. 20 2011
Format: DVD
A charming, sweet film, that explores the nature of nostalgia (its glow
and its darker shadows), and shows off Paris, both modern day, and in
the 1920s, almost as beautifully as Manhattan showed off New York.

Laced with wonderful cameo and supporting performances (Adrien Brody,
Kathy Bates, Marion Cotillard, Corey Stoll, just to name a few) and
gifted by a quirky, lovably sad Owen Wilson as a sort of Eyeore of a
struggling writer in the lead.

Wilson is probably the best stand in yet for Allen in one of his films,
precisely because he's so different from Allen, and doesn't seem to be
doing an Allen impersonation. (Even Allen admitted that part of the
appeal in casting Wilson was casting someone so far from himself).

The 94 minutes of the film flew by, and never lost it's charm.

A number of professional critics noted that this was a new tone for
Allen, neither laugh out loud comedy, nor serious drama (or, as in his
greatest films a combination of the two), but is more of a light drama,
with a gentle comic whimsy. I actually think Allen started exploring
this interesting new tone with his last film 'You Will Meet a Tall Dark
Stranger' And it does seem to have reinvigorated him.

I did have a couple of problems with the film. First, Rachel McAdams as
Wilson's fiancé, along with her family, were made too caraciturish, too
obviously 'bad' for a film this subtle. McAdams is a brilliant actress,
but here she seems pushed into being a symbol of all that's wrong with
shallow, materialistic Americans.
Read more ›
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By The Movie Guy HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on July 10 2016
Format: DVD
WARNING: I GIVE YOU HEAVY CLUES/HINTS ABOUT WHAT HAPPENS AT MIDNIGHT WHICH TAKES PLACE EARLY IN THE FILM. I DO NOT CONSIDER THIS TO BE A "SPOILER" BUT OTHERS MIGHT.

The film opens with a lengthy jazz tune while showing us the splendor, romance, and fantasy of Paris to set the mood. Owen Wilson plays Gil, a role Woody Allen wrote for his alter-ego. He is a Hollywood hack writer wanting nothing more than to be a struggling novelist living in Paris in the 1920's. He is engaged to Inez (Rachel McAdams). Like Woody's other main characters, he recognizes when people are pretentious and pseudo-intellectuals such as Inez's friends. This is a running theme in his productions either in front of or behind the camera. Hint: If you couldn't understand why Allen is a genius from his other films, feel free to skip this one.

Gil desires to move to Paris. Inez is somewhat Republican and can't imagine living anywhere but the USA. One evening the two couples are out. Three of them want to go dancing while Gil does not. Instead he opts to take a nice leisurely stroll back to the hotel. Unfortunately he didn't drop any bread crumbs and like too many Americans in Paris he doesn't speak French so he can't ask for directions. (If you have ever been to Paris you know all those French can speak English, but won't because they enjoy watching us struggle with their language.)

Then at midnight...Allen creates a whole movie around one of his old stand up comedy bits come to be known as "The Lost Generation" [...] which goes like this:

"I mentioned before that I was in Europe. It's not the first time that I was in Europe, I was in Europe many years ago with Ernest Hemingway.
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Format: DVD
Fantastic movie for art-lovers, well-acted, casted, and an excellent story.

I couldn't see anyone apart from Owen Wilson in this role. It's good to finally see him in a good film again.
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Format: DVD
Gave me a boost for a few weeks! Inspiring, uplifting type of movie for me as a music lover. It's my favorite of Woody, not fatalist or near crazy, simply imaginative, positive, light hearted and flavorish.. Allen seems to be happier than ever, as the main character played by actor Owen Wilson conveys us to the love for life, for the simple moment in the rain.
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By K. Gordon TOP 100 REVIEWER on Nov. 20 2011
Format: Blu-ray
A charming, sweet film, that explores the nature of nostalgia (its glow
and its darker shadows), and shows off Paris, both modern day, and in
the 1920s, almost as beautifully as Manhattan showed off New York.

Laced with wonderful cameo and supporting performances (Adrien Brody,
Kathy Bates, Marion Cotillard, Corey Stoll, just to name a few) and
gifted by a quirky, lovably sad Owen Wilson as a sort of Eyeore of a
struggling writer in the lead.

Wilson is probably the best stand in yet for Allen in one of his films,
precisely because he's so different from Allen, and doesn't seem to be
doing an Allen impersonation. (Even Allen admitted that part of the
appeal in casting Wilson was casting someone so far from himself).

The 94 minutes of the film flew by, and never lost it's charm.

A number of professional critics noted that this was a new tone for
Allen, neither laugh out loud comedy, nor serious drama (or, as in his
greatest films a combination of the two), but is more of a light drama,
with a gentle comic whimsy. I actually think Allen started exploring
this interesting new tone with his last film 'You Will Meet a Tall Dark
Stranger' And it does seem to have reinvigorated him.

I did have a couple of problems with the film. First, Rachel McAdams as
Wilson's fiancé, along with her family, were made too caraciturish, too
obviously 'bad' for a film this subtle. McAdams is a brilliant actress,
but here she seems pushed into being a symbol of all that's wrong with
shallow, materialistic Americans.
Read more ›
One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
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