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The Moonlit Road: And Other Stories Audio CD – Audiobook, Dec 22 2009

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Naxos Audio Books; abridged edition edition (Dec 1 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9626344946
  • ISBN-13: 978-9626344941
  • Product Dimensions: 17.3 x 13.9 x 1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 100 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,277,145 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

About the Author

Journalist, short story writer, and satirist Ambrose Bierce (1842–1914) was equally adept in a variety of genres, from ghost stories to poetry to political commentary. Bierce's fiction is particularly distinguished by its realistic depictions of the author's Civil War experiences. His other Thrift Editions include The Devil's Dictionary, An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge and Other Stories, and Civil War Stories.
 
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The Moonlit Road and Other Ghost and Horror Stories is another marvelous, inexpensive reprint from Dover Publications. These twelve stories selected from The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce are remarkably good. I intend to become much better acquainted with Ambrose Bierce.
Bierce had an inventive imagination, much like Edgar Allan Poe. In this chilling collection we meet angry spirits seeking revenge, humans transformed into wild beasts, and individuals deranged by encounters with apparitions. Although written a century ago, several stories explored subjects that seemed surprisingly modern. The Man and the Snake is a frightening study of the psychology of one man's imagination. Time and space are transformed in A Psychological Shipwreck. And we meet an emotional, possibly unstable, thinking machine in Moxon's Master.
I considered listing the stories that were my favorites. However, as I enjoyed all twelve stories, I decided to forego the exercise. Buy this little collection. You won't be disappointed.
Ambrose Bierce fought at Shiloh and Chickamauga, was wounded at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain in 1864, and retired after the war at the rank of major. Later, as a newspaperman in San Francisco, his acerbic wit and penchant for satire made him a significant force in its vibrant literary community. In 1913 he disappeared while traveling in Mexico, possibly a victim of the Mexican Civil war.
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Format: Paperback
This contains only a small sampling of author Ambrose Bierce's work with ghost and horror stories. Most are the ghost sotries we are used to with vengeful spirits or loved ones trying to connect to the world of the living, but have just the right little twist to make them unique. In "The Middle Toe of the Right Foot," for example, what starts out as a duel in an empty house ends up with the death of a duelist by the ghosts that inhabit the palce and recognize him. Other stories deal with man's own fear of the unknown, such as in "The Man and the Snake" or "A Watcher of the Dead," in which the characters literally scare themselves to death. The most unique story in this collection, though, is the last one titles "Moxon's Master," which gives a dealy warning about the progress fo man and machine. These are all great tales to read aloud by the campfire and are sure to send just the right amount of chills down your spine.
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Format: Paperback
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) was a Victorian author of the weird and macabre specialing in ghost stories. Though during his life he was more renowned as a satirist, journalist, and editorialist. Thankfully, we've remembered him for his eerie tales. I've come across his stories in anthologies several times but this is the first author specific collection I've read. I had come across three of these stories before, but they make good re-reading. Bierce is comparable to Poe but easier to read. The stories in this collection have been selected from the 1909-1912 editions of "The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce" and show a mix of his ghost and, as the title calls them, "horror" stories (but I wouldn't necessarily give them that classification, but more general simply "weird tales"). I liked the weird, macabre tales the best and I'd recommend him to your reading list for those interested in Victorian ghost stories or tales of the weird.

1) The Eyes of the Panther - A young woman refuses to marry a man repeatedly and he demands to know why so she tells him she is insane and proceeds to tell him a story. It's a good story but it made me think too much of the original movie "Cat People", perhaps they got the idea from this story. (3/5)

2) The Moonlit Road - I hadn't recognized just by the title but it came to me quickly that I've read this one before. A son is called home from college urgently to discover his mother has been brutally murdered. Shortly afterward his father, while out on a walk with him, takes off and disappears forever. Told in three points of view first from the son, then the father and finally the mother, through the aid of a medium.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9d101720) out of 5 stars 14 reviews
22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d10e3a8) out of 5 stars Contains several essential Bierce stories, and is cheap. Nov. 26 1999
By Ole Bentsen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
There is a reason why you should buy this book, and there is a reason why you should not.
If you have not read any stories by Ambrose Bierce before, then this book is a wonderful way for you to get acquainted with them, since it is cheap and has the stories essential for someone who wants to know what his writing is like.
On the other hand, any dedicated Ambrose Bierce fan will find this book inadequate and too short, so they should go for the greater books or anthologies, since they truly encompass the entire spectrum and contain all variations of Bierce's story-telling.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d10e3fc) out of 5 stars Something for the reading around the campfire.... July 19 2001
By Jeffrey Leeper - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This small book contains 12 of Ambrose Bierce's short stories (The Eyes of the Panther, The Moonlit Road, The Boarded Window, The Man and the Snake, The Secret of Macarger's Gulch, The Middle Toe of the Right Foot, A Psychological Shipwreck, A Holy Terror, John Bartine's Watch, Beyond the Wall, A Watcher by the Dead, and Moxon's Master). The stories cover ghosts, revenge, and otherworldly messages. This is by no means a definitive collection of Bierce's work, but it is a good, inexpensive introduction.
The stories are short and do not go into intense detail and background. These are compact and complete enough to be told around the campfire or just around the living room with the lights turned out. Bierce knows his reader and will often give the ending an unexpected twist.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d10e834) out of 5 stars Chilling Collection of Imaginative Ghost Stories Dec 6 2003
By Michael Wischmeyer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Moonlit Road and Other Ghost and Horror Stories is another marvelous, inexpensive reprint from Dover Publications. These twelve stories selected from The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce are remarkably good. I intend to become much better acquainted with Ambrose Bierce.
Bierce had an inventive imagination, much like Edgar Allan Poe. In this chilling collection we meet angry spirits seeking revenge, humans transformed into wild beasts, and individuals deranged by encounters with apparitions. Although written a century ago, several stories explored subjects that seemed surprisingly modern. The Man and the Snake is a frightening study of the psychology of one man's imagination. Time and space are transformed in A Psychological Shipwreck. And we meet an emotional, possibly unstable, thinking machine in Moxon's Master.
I considered listing the stories that were my favorites. However, as I enjoyed all twelve stories, I decided to forego the exercise. Buy this little collection. You won't be disappointed.
Ambrose Bierce fought at Shiloh and Chickamauga, was wounded at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain in 1864, and retired after the war at the rank of major. Later, as a newspaperman in San Francisco, his acerbic wit and penchant for satire made him a significant force in its vibrant literary community. In 1913 he disappeared while traveling in Mexico, possibly a victim of the Mexican Civil war.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d10ebf4) out of 5 stars but they make good re-reading. Bierce is comparable to Poe but easier ... Feb. 7 2016
By Nicola Mansfield - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) was a Victorian author of the weird and macabre specialing in ghost stories. Though during his life he was more renowned as a satirist, journalist, and editorialist. Thankfully, we've remembered him for his eerie tales. I've come across his stories in anthologies several times but this is the first author specific collection I've read. I had come across three of these stories before, but they make good re-reading. Bierce is comparable to Poe but easier to read. The stories in this collection have been selected from the 1909-1912 editions of "The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce" and show a mix of his ghost and, as the title calls them, "horror" stories (but I wouldn't necessarily give them that classification, but more general simply "weird tales"). I liked the weird, macabre tales the best and I'd recommend him to your reading list for those interested in Victorian ghost stories or tales of the weird.

1) The Eyes of the Panther - A young woman refuses to marry a man repeatedly and he demands to know why so she tells him she is insane and proceeds to tell him a story. It's a good story but it made me think too much of the original movie "Cat People", perhaps they got the idea from this story. (3/5)

2) The Moonlit Road - I hadn't recognized just by the title but it came to me quickly that I've read this one before. A son is called home from college urgently to discover his mother has been brutally murdered. Shortly afterward his father, while out on a walk with him, takes off and disappears forever. Told in three points of view first from the son, then the father and finally the mother, through the aid of a medium. None of them knows the whole truth, only the reader is able put most of it together, but afterthought still leaves a few questions. A creepy story. (4/5)

3) The Boarded Window - This is a creepy shocker that you have no idea where it is going. It starts off easy going enough and you wonder where it is going by the halfway point; it is quite short. Then it starts getting interesting with the tension mounting and pow! it gets you with the ending. (5/5)

4) The Man and the Snake - Another creepy little story with the shocker ending. This time, it leaves you puzzled wondering if what occurred was real or all in the mind. (5/5)

5) The Secret of Macarger's Gulch - A well-told ghost story! A man stops at an abandoned house in the middle of nowhere. He can't get to sleep because of a feeling of danger, perhaps a bear or a ghost? He does fall asleep, dreams, then wakes up and that is when the adventure begins. Leaves an uneasy feeling. (5/5)

6) The Middle Toe of the Right Foot - Oh I liked this, not very frightening but a bit grizzly to start. A house remains abandoned because of its claim to be haunted but not least likely because the former owner one night slashed the throats of his wife and two children and then absconded into the night. Some time later the house becomes the designated sight of two gentlemen who have called each other out to a duel: a knife fight in a darkened room. (4/5)

7) A Psychological Shipwreck - A man has a vision of an encounter with a young woman on a sinking ship, then rouses to find that he himself has been fine and dandy on another ship all this time. Then ensues an interesting story. A bit "whoo-whoo" for the times but didn't do much for me. (3/5)

8) A Holy Terror - This is just plain creepy. I'm not sure if it is a ghost story or not but a man does meet up with a skeleton and his death while grave digging and that is only a part of the story! A man goes to a ghost town that was once a thriving California Gold Rush town. Now deserted he plots off a stake and decidedly sets out looking for something specific and then we are told his curious history and what follows. This is the longest story in the collection so far. (4/5)

9) John Bartine's Watch: A Story by a Physician - A fairly short story of a man who is troubled by the watch of an ancestor who was taken away as a traitor to the rebel George Washington and never heard from again. Atmospheric, but predictable ending. (3/5)

10) Beyond the Wall - A man visits an old friend he hasn't seen in some time to find him in a dejected state, upon hearing a tapping on his tower wall the friend relates a tale of unremitted love, sorrow, death and ghosts. Again very atmospheric. (4/5)

11) A Watcher by the Dead - Three doctors play a game by betting that a man cannot spend the night in an abandoned house with a corpse in the dark due to some theory they have. Things turn out as we suspect but there is a surprising twist ending and then the author turns to humour to finish off the tale. I didn't like the funny part but the rest was good. (4/5)

12) Moxon's Master - This would have been a chilling tale at its own time. One that deals with whether machine's have intelligence. The first half was a bit boring for me as the philosophy and science is outdated by modern standards but I can imagine the thought it provoked at the time. Then it gets into the story of whether one man, a machinist, has created a thinking machine. It has a creepy ending. I really enjoyed this, though, because it explored an automaton chess player and a few years ago I read a graphic novel on *the* famous Victorian automaton chess player which was very good. (4/5)
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d10ecd8) out of 5 stars Great Gothic Horror Stories Feb. 5 2016
By Jayme Erickson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
From the piercing eyes of a snake to the ghost of lost love and everything in between these are definitely stories to tell in the dark. This anthology was written by Ambrose Bierce in the 1890s around the time Mark Twain was popular. This tome deals with many different themes: supernatural, psychological, and has something to appeal to the fears of everyone. Though the writing is antiquated, the subject is not lost to the reader, and will especially appeal to those lovers of Victorian literature. Bierce is known for having twist endings and these stories can definitely be considered to have twist endings. Unfortunately, we live in a society where most scary story tropes have been done so the stories come off slightly predictable. If you can take this for what it is, old scary stories then they are very enjoyable. There wasn't a tale I didn't like. The style reminded me of Poe and can be confidently added to one's collection of classic gothic horror.

I give this book a 5 out of 5 and recommend it to anyone who is a fan of Edgar Allen Poe and the like. I will be looking for more of Ambrose Pierce's publications.


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