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Mother of Storms Mass Market Paperback – May 15 1995

3.4 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; Reprint edition (May 15 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812533453
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812533453
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 2.9 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 281 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,308,307 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

This futuristic disaster novel by the author of A Million Open Doors opens in the year 2028, when a preemptive missile strike releases billions of tons of methane trapped in the ocean floor. The resultant atmospheric heat spawns massive supernatural hurricanes that ravage the world's coastlands and claim millions of lives. The only hope of salvation rests with astronaut Louie Tynan--who has become superintelligent, perhaps superhuman, through a computer system linked to his mind--and his desperate plan to shield the earth from the sun until it can cool. Along the way, a well-drawn cast play various roles in combatting the escalating crisis: a canny female U.S. President, an opportunistic capitalist, a spunky journalist et al. Barnes maintains a breakneck pace even while loading his narrative with vital briefings on hurricane formation, information processing and the physics of space travel; some of his speculations, in fact, are breathtaking. This winning blend of gripping thrilller and dazzling SF should establish Barnes as one of the most able and impressive of SF's rising stars.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

When a tactical nuclear strike releases massive amounts of methane from the North Pacific's ocean beds, global weather patterns transform the entire ocean surface into a massive spawning ground for hurricanes. As perpetual storms threaten to decimate Earth's population, politicians, scientists, and visionaries grope for solutions while ordinary people struggle to stay alive. In the best tradition of disaster novels, Barnes (Orbital Resonance, LJ 9/1/92; A Million Open Doors, LJ 10/15/91) juggles multiple plot lines as he builds to the grand finale. Compellingly orchestrated and filled with fascinating bits of weather lore, this novel will have broad appeal.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Looking at reviews of other John Barnes books, it seems as though reviewers can't write three sentences without invoking Robert Heinlein's name, as in "Barnes continues in the vein of..." or "Writing in the spirit of...". Interestingly for this novel, Barnes has cast aside his +5 Mantle of Robert Heinlein and is instead channeling Greg Bear.
Just as in most of Greg Bear's books (such as "Blood Music", "Slant" and "Darwin's Radio") Barnes' tale presents us with a bevy of characters confronted with a looming crisis who are affected by it in different personal ways. Story threads featuring the President, a nervy reporter, the Astronaut, a college student and a Porn Star are thrown at the reader. ("Slant" had most of these, including the Porn Star.)
Often, these story threads intersect. Will the college student meet the Porn Star? Will the Porn Star meet the President? Are the President and the Astronaut star-crossed lovers? (Yes, Yes, and thankfully, No.)
Barnes' strength appears to be in building interesting, internally consistent and plausible worlds. The "device" for this book is XV. XV is like TV, but for your brain. Just plug in and feel what others are feeling. Apparently, this is a wonderful way to sustain a world-wide riot.
For the hard-SF crowd, the book picks up in the middle with computer-brain interfaces leading to Metaphysical Problems of the Self. But I think that this pushes the final portion of the book into metaphysical gobbledygook, making the ending a bit of an anticlimax.
The brisk pacing of the book makes it hard to put down, which makes for good beach reading. I only wish that the ending had more punch.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
The novel Mother of Storms has some ok plotting, some ok sex scenes, and plenty of fascinating information about meteorology. Nothing stands out to make this a good novel, but for some reason I kept turning the pages to find out what happened at the end.
The story begins when a missile attack in Siberia leads to rapid global warming and gigantic hurricanes spring up all around the world. For most of the book, the plot follows the conventions of disaster epics. We're introduced to a huge cast of characters, including the President of the US, a porn star, a reporter, a businessman, and several scientists. The characters run into each other on various occasions throughout the novel. There's a lot of talking about impending disaster, a lot of sex (sometimes both at the same time), a lot of political diatribes, and a lot of action scenes, most of which are fairly well written. The novel is packed fairly densely with plot, so some of the plot lines don't get developed as much as they should. Others, such as a ridiculous story about a man trying to avenge his daughter's death, should have been left out entirely. While there's nothing to make this novel special or memorable, it does keep you reading till the end, just to see how Barnes will wrap up all of his diverging plot lines.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I did not like this book very much. The author had an interesting concept, but through his tedious long-winded writing turned what should have been fascinating and thrilling into merely boring.
There are many characters in this story, and more than once the author leaves a semi-developed character in limbo...they just sort of get forgotten about and he nevers comes back to them to tie up any loose ends. The few characters that he does stick with through the end of the book aren't very interesting really, unless you enjoy the occasional semi-hardcore porn scenes that a few of them are in. These sex scenes rarely have any bearing on the plot and seem pointless.
The science fiction angle of this book is more about cyber technology and the implications of it on humanity than about anything relating to the world devouring storms you might expect from such a titled book. This story could have just as easily been told without any storms at all and because of this, what ends up happening is that the climatological disaster we expect really becomes meaningless to the issues developed in the plot.
The overall effect of this book was tedium. Too long, too many undeveloped characters, too many techno gadgets that aren't explained in enough detail...too bad, it could have been a great story.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I found none of the characters the least bit compelling or sympathetic. The best characterization in the book is of the different hurricanes! This book is definitely not in the same league as some of the "great" SF disaster novels, such as those by Niven & Pournelle in the 70's. Those guys managed to present characters that at least captured my interest enough so I cared about how things turned out for them. The plot is flat and very predictable--I was surprised there weren't some curve balls thrown into the old formulas. This book, moreso even than most modern SF/adventure writing, portrayed women as the playthings of men who were supposedly doing the important stuff, with the exception of two female characters. Because all of the characters were shown in such a shallow way, it was hard to tell if these two were given even shorter shrift than the males, but I think they were. The sex scenes, especially involving the "redeemed" porn star, were completely unerotic, and unnecessary. Don't bother with this one.
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