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Movement Import

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Nov. 3 1992)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: WEA
  • ASIN: B000002MGT
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
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1. Dreams Never End
2. Truth
3. Senses
4. Chosen Time
5. ICB
6. The Him
7. Doubts Even Here
8. Denial

Product Description

Amazon.ca

This is New Order's debut in name only, with the ghost of Ian Curtis still hanging heavily over his grieving Joy Division bandmates. It would take them one more step, to the brilliant Power, Corruption and Lies, to really assert their own power. Movement, then, is the sound of guitarist Bernard Sumner, percussionist Stephen Morris, and innovative bassist Peter Hook building a bridge from JD's Sturm und Drang drone to New Order's considerably brighter dance pop. It's an interesting bridge to cross though, peppered with dark highlights like the almost poppy "Dreams Never End," the blip-blooping electro chaos of the Pere Ubu-influenced "ICB," and "The Him," with its rhythmic echoes of JD's "Atrocity Exhibition." --Michael Ruby

Customer Reviews

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Format: Audio CD
They might have goofed in front-loading their debut with the sprightly, catchy 'Dreams Never End'- -the rest of the album is pretty dour and a bit of a letdown after such an auspicious beginning. It seems they couldn't make up their collective mind as to direction: hence 'Dreams', which sounds like a hit single and, remarkably, like nothing in the Joy Division canon; the haunting 'Doubts Even Here', ostensibly the sequel to both 'Atmosphere' and 'In A Lonely Place'; and the sequencer-driven 'Chosen Time' which anticipates the follow-up POWER, CORRUPTION AND LIES and the direction the band would persue throughout the 80s. Not surprising, really, as much of the material was probably written as Joy Division while Ian Curtis was alive and had to be finished without him. ('Ceremony', the debut single, was performed live with Curtis on JD's STILL.) A hint of cynicism concerning the band's audience pervades the album as well, though- -the vocals are treated in more than a few spots so as to mimic Curtis, most notably on 'Dreams Never End' and 'Doubts Even Here' in which Ian's ghost seemingly performs. The band was definitely haunted by Curtis' absence: his presence permeates the album. There are some great moments, to be sure- -aside from 'Dreams Never End', 'ICB' lopes merrily along and manages to transcend its own weight with its whoopy synth calls and ascending progression. And 'Doubts Even Here' is darkly beautiful. It's also rather aptly titled- -IS that Curtis? It isn't, but I'm not really sure it's Bernard Sumner, either. Or Peter Hook, for that matter. That's the thing about ghosts. They're there but they're not.
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Format: Audio CD
Despite the often inferior lyrics and the regrettable Joy Division parody - Doubts Even Here, Movement contains some of the most brilliant music from the early 80s. Some songs are just stellar. Truth and Senses are flawless. I suppose this music is early electronica in places.
Curtis' vocals - the emotional depth he was able to bring to Closer - obviously couldn't be duplicated, although it sounds like the band is trying. Yet, there is a mechanical-computerized element in much of Movement that predates Blue Monday and which works quite well. Clearly, with the Bauhaus cover art and album title, New Order isn't just trying to recreate Joy Division. Even that exercise did yield good fruit, though. The song In a Lonely Place is great (the b-side for the band's first single).
Dreams Never End is similar to the original FAC 33 release of Ceremony. Both are excellent. (I prefer the original Ceremony to the version on Substance.)
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By A Customer on Oct. 19 2003
Format: Audio CD
This is the most depressing album I've ever heard. It's like looking at the world through blue-colored glasses. Yet it's still cool sounding. The music is amazing! The guitars are off the wall with melody and rythm, the drums are furious and precise and the claustrophobic atmosphere created by the production all amount to a band going into self-induced trance where they channel dark forces of nature to keep from imploding.
The lyrics just seem like gibberish to me, they just evoke feelings and scenes but the interpretation is mostly in your head.
Unique.
But be warned, this music is FATAL in its power of melancholy. Their friend and former band leader had just committed suicide so understandably they were in a mood of complete and utter despair when they made this album.
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Format: Audio CD
This first album released by New Order in 1981 is a wonderful gloomy taste of sturm und drang, echoing out of poignantly scattered debris of Ian Curtis' suicide. This gloomy, artsy, beautifully dark album seems like it comes from the hauntingly hope-devoid streets of Manchester which wrought this foundational New Wave band. Excellent album: dark bored vocals, beautifully woven guitars, haunting synths.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa40dd7d4) out of 5 stars 46 reviews
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa46d85c4) out of 5 stars Dreams Roll On April 11 2005
By H. L. Thomas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I was a huge fan of Joy Division and Public Image Limited in that time, and still love them. That said. I am a New Order fan. I was of the few in San Francisco that saw them at the I-Beam on the first sans Ian tour. They were touching. That said.

Strip them of their history and take this album as it is for the time it was released and even today, and still it holds as a very good set of songs about stretching across a blackened musical landscape of minor chords and sketchy guitar with guilt ridden vocals and the occasional dance-trippy melodies. Movement is a musical statement. It shows the now and the where to go of the later masterpiece, Power, Corruption And Lies. Movement is a gloomy record, but that's ok, the dark wave really did rejoice in it's melancholy and of course in it's layered sounds. Put this album next to PIL Metal BOX and Echo and the Bunneymens Heaven Up Here and you have a couple of dreamy hours into the netherlands of what was to become of Manchester and American Brit rock idolators. Great stuff, and a wonderful clarion call to what was to become the makings of the greatest dance single of all time from the darkness of Dreams Never End: Blue Monday. After the regrettabel suicide of Ian Curtis, who I hope has found some new incarntion better fitted to his damaged soul, New Order lifted spirits rathers than dampened them.
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa43a669c) out of 5 stars Doubts Even Here Dec 29 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I watched New Order perform the content of this watershed album at Plato's ballroom in Liverpool - it was their first gig in the U.K. as New Order and they had just returned from New York where they had unveiled their metamorphic identity.
The place was packed.....and dotted among the audience were the luminaries of the North West scene, from Pete Wylie, manic, high, through to Tony wilson, dry and smirking....svengali-like, knowing what he had.
And suddenly there they were, legends already, Dreams Never End assaulting the thick smoky clubby atmoshere, fast, energetic - the link to the past, evoking memories of Transmission and Love Will Tear Us Apart....and Truth, the quirky drum machine....I forget the gig order now but they did the whole of this short album plus In A Lonely Place and Ceremony.
For me this album remains a memory of something very special.... the crysalis stage of something that blossomed into a glorious freedom of expression. In some ways this is a tough listen - a bridge to the swirling, delirious Power Corruption and Lies from the sombre Closer. It does get waylaid in places, but the high points - The him, and the breathtaking Doubts Even Here are reminders of how these people reached out and made us all wonder about things which in our more cynical moods we would dismiss as pretentious nonsense....like how modern music can approach the soul, and be art.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa3dabf18) out of 5 stars A Must Have! June 18 2007
By Michael Wiley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I don't know why people like to rag on this album. It's brilliant!

All the theoretical, intellectual and creative darkness of Joy Division was simply that, theoretical. This album is the reflection of real emotional torment. It's always surprised me that people criticize Movement for being dreary and unenergized when it's that aesthetic which Joy Division used and elaborated on. Once you listen to it with open ears you'll hear that it contains a great deal of power.

Movement is intense, the music is sonically more dramatic and diverse than Unknown Pleasures or Closer. It has this great electronic aspect to it which upon listening closely is very lush and dynamic. The second track "Truth" is my favorite, those synths are so heavy and powerful...robotic Wagner, and Sumner's week and weary vocal is such a stark contrast to the might of this track.

The bass driven, dark dance grooves on much of the album are great interpretations of Disco, which makes it sound the way Techno does when you're in a K-hole. The whole sound of this album is like being in a hole, a very deep hole. For those who love the constructive darkness of Joy Division, you won't like this album, it's honestly too dark and it lacks all the posing, posturing and rowdiness of Punk which Joy Division definitely had to it's sound. This is the beginning of the anonymous construction called New Order and the end of the Rock band, Joy Division.

Being a fan of both Joy Division and New Order as well as a lover of artists such as Kraftwerk, Gary Numan and Brian Eno I truly enjoy the electronic experimentation on this album. The analog synths shine dark here. This is definitely an electronic album.

That's right, this is not a Rock album. If anything, it's a dub album with electro beats and layered synths. The guitar is used as a wash of atmospheric sound or as a treble background to the bass toned synths. Only in two tracks are the lead and rhythm guitars used as the primary melodic device. Everything else is synth, bass, drum machine, drums and electronic noise.

This is a must have album, a record of torment and an important piece in the sound progression from the boys who brought you Warsaw, Joy Division and New Order.

- Michael Wiley
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
By Mark Champion - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
They might have goofed in front-loading their debut with the sprightly, catchy 'Dreams Never End'- -the rest of the album is pretty dour after such an auspicious beginning. It seems they couldn't make up their collective mind as to direction. Hence 'Dreams', which sounds like a hit single and, remarkably, like nothing in the Joy Division canon; the haunting 'Doubts Even Here', ostensibly the sequel to both 'Atmosphere' and 'In A Lonely Place'; and the sequencer-driven 'Chosen Time' which anticipates the follow-up POWER, CORRUPTION AND LIES and the direction the band would pursue throughout the 80s. Not surprising, really, as much of the material was probably written as Joy Division while Ian Curtis was alive and had to be finished without him. ('Ceremony', the debut single, was performed live with Curtis on JD's STILL.) A hint of cynicism concerning the band's audience pervades the album as well, though - - the vocals are treated in more than a few spots so as to mimic Curtis, most notably on 'Dreams Never End' and 'Doubts Even Here' in which Ian's ghost seemingly performs (it's actually Peter Hook). The band was definitely haunted by Curtis: his absence permeates the album. There are some great moments, to be sure - - aside from 'Dreams Never End', 'ICB' lopes merrily along and manages to transcend its own weight with its whoopy synth calls and ascending progression. And 'Doubts Even Here' is darkly beautiful. It's also rather aptly titled- -IS that Curtis? It isn't, but it's easy to imagine it isn't Hook, either. That's the thing about ghosts. They're there but they're not.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa3dab204) out of 5 stars A Religious Experience Nov. 17 2005
By J. B. Shega - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
MOVEMENT is New Order's debut following the suicide of Ian Curtis and the dissolution of Joy Division. As such, it complements CLOSER perfectly, yet I consider it superior to that exalted album--blasphemy, I know, but MOVEMENT has a richer, more nuanced sound than the repetitive, intentionally deadened beats of CLOSER. But enough of pointless comparisons: MOVEMENT is very much a must-have album for anyone's musical collection. Why, you may ask? Well, I shall tell you: even though it's the most underrated and disliked album in New Order's canon, it has the most intensity, the most feeling of all their recordings. Bernard Sumner's voice has an emotional depth and purpose not seen on later drippy pop noodlings like the majority of 1993's REPUBLIC--or even 1989's TECHNIQUE for that matter. Also, the lyrics actually make sense. Imagine that! Though many fans lambast Sumner for attempting to replicate Curtis' irreplaceable poesy and heart-wrenching, mind-numbingly depressing style, I think Barney takes the band in a different direction than it had done before and since. Sure, MOVEMENT has, at face value, the same proto-gothic style a la CLOSER, but it has an energy and defiance that the latter lacks. MOVEMENT shies away from the completely abject self-loathing so ubiquitous in Joy Division and instead concocts that famous New Order romanticism: lonely teens anywhere can relate to the impassioned lyrics which concern nostalgia, lost love, and reflection. MOVEMENT may be rather gloomy, but it's more from an observational viewpoint than a personal one. Consider "The Him" or "ICB": both are presumably Sumner and the band's reaction to Curtis' death. MOVEMENT broods but never to the point of suicide. Although this album is magnificent in itself, it would have been even better if the singles and B-sides had been included, as well. New Order during this time ('81-'83) was at its most inventive, and this disc certainly proves that.



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