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NEW Man Who Never Was (DVD)

4.5 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Language: English, French, Spanish
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B0007ZEOQE
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #4,263 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Product Description

MAN WHO NEVER WAS (DVD/SENSORMATIC) ACTION/ADVENTURE

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Anyone interested in an absorbing wartime spy story, particularly devotees of 1950s British cinema, should not miss the digitally remastered version of "The Man Who Never Was" on blu-ray. The excellent restoration, in original 2.35.1 aspect ratio and with decent LPCM audio, constitutes the best presentation of this minor classic for home entertainment.

Based on a real military operation, the plot concerns the ingenious use of a dead man, given the identity of a Royal Marines officer, to deceive the Germans about allied intentions before the invasion of Sicily in 1943. So is created Major William Martin and his story goes on from there. The actual operation, codenamed "Mincemeat," was conceived from an idea suggested by a young naval intelligence lieutenant named Ian Fleming, who went on later to write the James Bond novels.

Clifton Webb, as Lt. Commander Montagu, leads a strong cast of British character actors along with a coldly smooth Stephen Boyd as an Irish enemy agent and Gloria Graeme, the love interest. A taut, suspenseful screenplay by Nigel Balchin is expertly directed by Ronald Neame. Watch for some great views of post-war London.
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Format: VHS Tape
My son asked me to purchase some WWII DVD's for him this past Christmas. Sadly, I wasn't able to include the best NAVAL WWII movies which were made by the British. Two of the best of them were The Man Who Never Was and Sink The Bismark. Sadly neither of these titles are available on DVD. Both are better than just about any of the American WWII movies (yes, I'm an American). Both of these movies are based on TRUE stories (Unlike Disney's latest Pearl Harbor movie!!), only the minor characters are fictional. If you ever see the Man who Never Was you will never forget it. The story is about a true scheme which the Brits used to make the Germans believe the southern European landings were going to be in a different location than the real one. They discuss how to do this and come up with the idea of obtaining a body of a young man, which they are going to dress up as an officer with invasion plans for another location than the one intended. The movie spends a lot of time explaining how they got the body, what they had to do to fake all this, including figuring out on which European beach they should have the body wash ashore. Unlike most American movies, you really get an excellent view of what it's really like to plan CIA type operations. Wonderful movie. You will love all the characters, even the villains!! Lots of naval action from the highest to the lowest commands. Buy it.
---UNFORTUNATELY IT IS NOT AVAILABLE ON DVD YET!!!----
Neither is "Sink the Bismark", which I remember seeing in college back in the early '60's. I remember it vividly because the auditorium in which it was shown allowed the audience to "attack and sink" the Bismark using paper airplanes!! This movie is also terrific. It too is VERY British. It too explains why the British Navy was so awesome in WWII.
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Format: VHS Tape
Although the film was a ostensibly a 20th Century Fox production, THE MAN WHO NEVER WAS was filmed in England using primarily English crew and cast (though American leads). It belongs to a tradition of English war films in which aspects of the war are treated slowly, deliberately, and with great precision. While in the US war films tended to feature John Wayne leading Marines into combat, the British tended to focus much more on the preparation and plans of operations. For instance, the very fine film THE DAM BUSTERS features very little in the way of actual combat. And THE MAN WHO NEVER WAY has no combat whatsoever.
The movie is based on a book by the same name about Operation Mincemeat, in which the British attempted to mislead the Germans about the intended invasion spot for D-Day by planting a corpse with fake papers on a beach in Spain, knowing that the Spanish would pass the papers onto the Germans. The entire movie is involved with the formation of the plan, and then creating the man who never was, creating his papers and personal effects. On one level, not much happens in the film, but on another it is one of the most fascinating films ever made about the war, because of the practical problems they deal with in the executing of the operation. Knowing that it was all based upon real events greatly adds to the appeal of the film.
Clifton Webb, who was in fact far too old for the part, turns in a convincing performance as Lieutenant Commander Montagu. In most of his films he comes across as arrogant, but in this one he instead communicates competence and intelligence. Gloria Grahame is excellent as the primary female presence in the film. If you look carefully, you can spot Stephen Boyd in a small role, a few years before he would portray Messala in BEH-HUR.
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Format: VHS Tape
This is the story of a British plot to trick the Germans during WWII into believing that, despite all appearances and obvious logic, they were going to invade Greece rather than Sicily. Clifton Webb stars as the officer that cooks up the plan, which essentially involves having a body wash up on shore in Spain with planted information that will do the misleading. A shiny Gloria Grahame co-stars as the woman who seems to be engaged to the man who never was, since they must create an identity for him. Sound confusing? It's not really as it unfolds in the film. The plot is quite interesting, especially given the fact that we know it's mostly true, although things happen quite quickly and it seems that this operation was much easier than I suspect it was. It's certainly not the greatest war/spy film ever made, but it is fun to watch the plot unfold and come together. It was definitely a brilliant, risky plan.
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