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Nasty Bit of Rough, A: A Novel Hardcover – Mar 5 2002

4.3 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Rugged Land (March 5 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590710002
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590710005
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2.5 x 21.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 340 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #577,813 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

From Publishers Weekly

This first novel by broadcaster and Golf Magazine columnist Feherty is a totally silly, completely unbelievable tall tale that succeeds more often than it fails because of the vibrancy of the voice and the straightforwardness of the telling. Scrought's Wood is the world's oldest and strangest golf course, so venerable it makes St. Andrew's look like a teenager. The membership has dwindled to nine, and the club, buried deep in Scottish gorse and heather, is virtually unknown to the outside world. Every 50 years, led by its owner and chairman Sir Richard Gusset ("Uncle Dickie"), its members compete in a golf match against the McGregor clan, a rough and ready gaggle of Scottish hillbillies, the prize being the petrified middle finger of St. Andrew, the patron saint of Scotland. Scrought's Wood, using very devious tactics, wins "The Digit," as it is known, only to have it stolen back by the McGregors while the old duffers are reveling in their victory. Scrought's Wood's members are gleefully eccentric, plagued by hilarious ailments, defects and unmentionable afflictions. When the outside world insists they allow a woman to join the club, one of the old-timers has a sex change operation. It would be awfully easy to dismiss this novel as trivial and inane, for many of the jokes are painfully set-up groaners, while others miss the mark entirely. Overall, one is often reminded of smirking teenage boys talking about sex. But there is a cheerfulness and a spit-in-the-face-of-authority aura about it that makes it the Naked Gun of golf literature. (Mar.)Forecast: Feherty, a former professional golfer, is a popular CBS commentator with a ready-made following; many will recognize Scrought's Wood from its appearances in the pages of Golf Magazine. His author tour engagements should be well attended, and he's a natural for radio and TV interviews.

Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

CBS golf commentator Feherty writes a column in Golf magazine about a fictional English golf club called Scrought's Wood, presided over by Major General (ret.) Sir Richard ("Little Dicky") Gussett and a band of stiff-upper-lipped hell-raisers who have more in common with the gang from Animal House than they do with the regulars at St. Andrews. Requests for more stories about Little Dicky prompted Feherty to tackle a novel, and he's come up with a rollicking farce in which Little Dicky and accomplices travel to Scotland, where they tangle with their ancient rivals, the MacGregor clan of the Tay Club, who are in possession of the most valued prize in golf, the Digit, otherwise known as the petrified middle finger of St. Andrew. What follows melds the best of the Crosby-Hope road pictures with the worst of the Three Stooges. Feherty throws together some genuine laughs, far too many incontinence jokes, and a tantalizing dose of golf history. Golfers who love the movie Caddyshack will love this book nearly as much. Bill Ott
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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