CDN$ 8.76
  • List Price: CDN$ 9.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 1.23 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
In the Night Kitchen has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

In the Night Kitchen Paperback – Jan 18 1996

4.3 out of 5 stars 60 customer reviews

See all 19 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 8.76
CDN$ 1.89 CDN$ 0.01

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • You'll save an extra 5% on Books purchased from Amazon.ca, now through July 29th. No code necessary, discount applied at checkout. Here's how (restrictions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

  • In the Night Kitchen
  • +
  • Where The Wild Things Are
Total price: CDN$ 15.03
Buy the selected items together

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Paperback: 40 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (Jan. 18 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0064434362
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064434362
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 0.3 x 27.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 172 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 60 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #8,858 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

From Amazon

When asked, Maurice Sendak insisted that he was not a comics artist, but an illustrator. However, it's hard to not notice comics aspects in works like In the Night Kitchen. The child of the story is depicted floating from panel to panel as he drifts through the fantastic dream world of the bakers' kitchen. Sendak's use of multiple panels and integrated hand-lettered text is an interesting contrast to his more traditional children's books containing single-page illustrations such as his wildly popular Where the Wild Things Are. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

The story of Mickey's nighttime adventure in the bakers' kitchen is "a highly original dream fantasy [with] deliciously playful illustrations [and a] chantable, easily remembered text. Pure delight for young children."--"BL."

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Storywraps TOP 500 REVIEWER on Aug. 22 2013
Format: Paperback
Mickey, who is in bed, hears a commotion downstairs and gets up to shout "be quiet down there." He proceeds to fall out of his bed, out of his pajamas, floats past his sleeping parents, and right into the midst of the night kitchen where a lot of bustling is going on. He encounters three chef's (with Hilter- mustaches) busily cooking up a cake for morning. They pour Mickey right into their cake batter and start stirring him in. They pour him into a cake pan and put him in the oven to cook, but luckily Mickey escapes and falls right into the bread dough which is rising. He manages to create a bread-dough plane and and flies up and up to a huge bottle of milk. He grabs the bakers some milk for their cake creation. Mickey happily pours the much needed milk into the batter which satisfies the bakers. As his dream fast forwards, Mickey finds himself waking up in his own bed, in the morning, "cakefree and dried." We learn "that's why, thanks to Mickey, we have cake every morning."
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
My three year old son has heard this story at least once a week since he was born. He is not tired of it yet. Neither am I.
The illustrations are reminiscent of 1960s children's advertisements, and are positively gorgeous! The cityscape made of kitchen containers and cooking utensils stimulates children's imagination and makes for a dreamy, innocent background to the charming story.
Some parents will no doubt fixate on the fact that Mickey is naked and has a penis (gasp!). If you are the parent of a little boy this should not shock you. If you are not the parent of a little boy, you are surely aware that boys do in fact have these things. I cannot understand why this one aspect of the book creates such controversy.
The cadences of the story are fun, and children are likely to take up chanting "Milk in the batter! Milk in the batter!" as they become familiar with the story. My son loves to say the words with me as I read, and the marching rhythm of the story makes it easy for him to remember.
It's a fun, silly book sure to become a favorite in your child's library.
As a sidenote, The Nutshell Kids collection has a video version of this, which is very good.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
My three year old son has heard this story at least once a week since he was born. He is not tired of it yet. Neither am I.
The illustrations are reminiscent of 1960s children's advertisements, and are positively gorgeous! The cityscape made of kitchen containers and cooking utensils stimulates children's imagination and makes for a dreamy, innocent background to the charming story.
Some parents will no doubt fixate on the fact that Mickey is naked and has a penis (gasp!). If you are the parent of a little boy this should not shock you. If you are not the parent of a little boy, you are surely aware that boys do in fact have these things. I cannot understand why this one aspect of the book creates such controversy.
The cadences of the story are fun, and children are likely to take up chanting "Milk in the batter! Milk in the batter!" as they become familiar with the story. My son loves to say the words with me as I read, and the marching rhythm of the story makes it easy for him to remember.
It's a fun, silly book sure to become a favorite in your child's library.
As a sidenote, The Nutshell Kids collection has a video version of this, which is very good.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I didn't want to give this book five stars. I fought against it, because I don't particularly enjoy the book. The illustrations aren't that attractive to me and it took me a while to get used to the rhythm of the words.
Having said that, I give this book five stars because my daughter LOVES this book. I sometimes have to hide it at night because I'm so tired of reading the "Mickey" book. Apparently Sendak knows an awful lot about what children like and how their minds work, because my daughter seldom tires of the story. (Her favorite part is when Mickey takes the measuring cup and goes up and up over the Milky Way.)
I'm honestly a little surprised over the "nekkid" controversy. It's not like the boy is drawn in explicit detail! My daughter's seen boy babies getting their diapers changed, so the concept of a penis is HARDLY frightening/startling/damaging to her. Geez, lighten up people!
Also, for those who were complaining about the concept of cake for breakfast, why don't we consider how many American children get French toast, pancakes, donuts, poptarts, or sugar-coated cereals for breakfast? Hardly nutritionally superior to cake, so I'm not lying in bed at night obsessing about the poor nutritional messages this book is sending to my child. :-)
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I discovered this book by accident a few months ago, and picked it up when I noticed that it was a Caldecott Honor Medal winner. I read through it and found it confusing, yet interesting.
My three-year-old goes through 2-3 week periods in which he has a favorite story that must be read every night at the end of our reading time. Lately, it's been "Where the Wild Things Are." So, tonight, I decided to begin the evening with "In the Night Kitchen." My son was transfixed by this story. He immediately wanted me to read it again. To the logical, adult mind it makes no sense. It didn't surprise me at all to read that previous reviewers were reminded of a drug trip. But from my child's point of view, it was a fantastic story. His eyes never left the pages, and he frequently nodded or exclaimed, wide-eyed, with mouth open. I found the rythym and cadence of the words, and it flowed very well.
If you find the book odd, just think of the words to the countless nursery rhymes that you've recited and loved so many times over the years. There are quite a few that make no sense at all! At least, not to grownups:)
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback