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Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s Hardcover – Jul 22 1992


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Praeger (July 22 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0313254672
  • ISBN-13: 978-0313254673
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 1.6 x 23.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 599 g
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Product Description

Review

"A delightful book about Mexican culture as seen through Mexican comic books, this study analyzes the influences and differences between these and their Euroamerican counterparts. Among other questions the authors ask "Why are comic books so popular in Mexico?" They analyze Kaliman, Lagrimas, Risas y amor, Los supermachos and Los agachados, Chanoc, El Payo, and La familia Burron. Kaliman, "The Incredible Man," read by all sectors, is described as representing "sanitized machismo," symbolizing male supremacy in the outer world. "Ordinary people and the authorities are basically helpless." Kaliman's sidekick, Solin, more Mexican-looking than the exotic Kaliman, is seen by the comic's creators as a role model for children, a "model of dependency." Other treatments are just as ingenious. The Mexican comic book, a sort of escapist folk or mass literature, is much more--it touches on themes such as class conflict, US cultural imperialism, and how Mexicans see the world. Not Just for Children makes one think and laugh. Highly recommended. All levels."-Choice

"The authors study in depth the leading comic books in the several categories and produce interesting and revealing photographs. Theirs is a study well worth the waiting and should lead to more studies in Mexican, Latin American and other studies."-Journal of Popular Culture

"What sets this book apart from others on Mexican or Latin American comics is that it takes a more holistic view of the Mexican comics. It does no focus just on characters, plots, and themes. Hinds and Tatum look at the social, political, and economic conditions affecting the artists/writers. For example, Eduardo del Rio. The authors have taken great care in their research and have spent much time in gathering complete or nearly complete publising runs of comics selected in the book. The book is written in such a style that it is appropriate for beginners or the serious researcher. This is a welcome addition to the English language research collection on Mexican comics."- Popular Culture in Libraries

?The authors study in depth the leading comic books in the several categories and produce interesting and revealing photographs. Theirs is a study well worth the waiting and should lead to more studies in Mexican, Latin American and other studies.?-Journal of Popular Culture

?What sets this book apart from others on Mexican or Latin American comics is that it takes a more holistic view of the Mexican comics. It does no focus just on characters, plots, and themes. Hinds and Tatum look at the social, political, and economic conditions affecting the artists/writers. For example, Eduardo del Rio. The authors have taken great care in their research and have spent much time in gathering complete or nearly complete publising runs of comics selected in the book. The book is written in such a style that it is appropriate for beginners or the serious researcher. This is a welcome addition to the English language research collection on Mexican comics.?- Popular Culture in Libraries

?A delightful book about Mexican culture as seen through Mexican comic books, this study analyzes the influences and differences between these and their Euroamerican counterparts. Among other questions the authors ask "Why are comic books so popular in Mexico?" They analyze Kaliman, Lagrimas, Risas y amor, Los supermachos and Los agachados, Chanoc, El Payo, and La familia Burron. Kaliman, "The Incredible Man," read by all sectors, is described as representing "sanitized machismo," symbolizing male supremacy in the outer world. "Ordinary people and the authorities are basically helpless." Kaliman's sidekick, Solin, more Mexican-looking than the exotic Kaliman, is seen by the comic's creators as a role model for children, a "model of dependency." Other treatments are just as ingenious. The Mexican comic book, a sort of escapist folk or mass literature, is much more--it touches on themes such as class conflict, US cultural imperialism, and how Mexicans see the world. Not Just for Children makes one think and laugh. Highly recommended. All levels.?-Choice

About the Author

HAROLD E. HINDS, JR. is Professor of History and Director of Latin American Studies, Division of Social Sciences, at the University of Minnesota-Morris.

CHARLES M. TATUM is Professor of Spanish and Head of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

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