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Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America Paperback – Jan 20 2015

4.9 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: Back Bay Books; Reprint edition (Jan. 20 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316221031
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316221030
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2.5 x 21 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 522 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #6,701 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

One of The Boston Globe's Best Books of 2014

One of iBooks' Top Ten Nonfiction Books of the Year

"Important, superbly written.... Jacobsen's book allows us to explore these questions with the ultimate tool: hard evidence. She confronts us with the full extent of Paperclip's deal with the devil, and it's difficult to look away."―Matt Damsker, USA Today (4 stars)

"With Annie Jacobsen's OPERATION PAPERCLIP for the first time the enormity of the effort has been laid bare. The result is a book that is at once chilling and riveting, and one that raises substantial and difficult questions about national honor and security...This book is a remarkable achievement of investigative reporting and historical writing."―Boston Globe

"As comprehensive as it is critical, this latest expose from Jacobsen is perhaps her most important work to date.... Jacobsen persuasively shows that it in fact happened and aptly frames the dilemma.... Rife with hypocrisy, lies, and deceit, Jacobsen's story explores a conveniently overlooked bit of history." -- Publishers Weekly (starred)

"The most in depth account yet of the lives of Paperclip recruits and their American counterparts.... Jacobsen deftly untangles the myriad German and American agencies and personnel involved...more gripping and skillfully rendered are the stories of American and British officials who scoured defeated Germany for Nazi scientists and their research."―New York Times Book Review

"Chilling, compelling, and comprehensive accounting.... Jacobsen's impressive book plumbs the dark depths of this postwar recruiting and shows the historical truths behind the space race and postwar US dominance. Highly recommended for readers in World War II history, espionage, government cover-ups, or the Cold War." -- Library Journal (starred)

"Darkly picaresque.... Jacobsen persuasively argues that the mindset of the former Nazi scientists who ended up working for the American government may have exacerbated Cold War paranoia."―New Yorker

"An engrossing and deeply disturbing exposé that poses ultimate questions of means versus ends." -- Booklist (starred)

"Annie Jacobsen's Operation Paperclip is a superb investigation, showing how the U.S. government recruited the Nazis' best scientists to work for Uncle Sam on a stunning scale. Sobering and brilliantly researched." -- Alex Kershaw, author of The Liberator

"Throughout, the author delivers harrowing passages of immorality, duplicity and deception, as well as some decency and lots of high drama. How Dr. Strangelove came to America and thrived, told in graphic detail." -- Kirkus Reviews

"[A] gripping, always disquieting story of a nation forced to trade principle for power.... Jacobsen gives us many vivid moments.... OPERATION PAPERCLIP takes its place in the annals of Cold War literature, one more proof that moral purity and great power can seldom coexist."―Chris Tucker, The Dallas Morning News

"Jacobsen uses newly released documents, court transcripts, and family-held archives to give the fullest accounting yet of this endeavor." -- The New York Post

"Doggedly researched." -- Parade

About the Author

Annie Jacobsen is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Area 51 and Operation Paperclip and was a contributing editor at the Los Angeles Times Magazine. A graduate of Princeton University, she lives in Los Angeles with her husband and two sons.


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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In her exhaustively researched book, Operation Paperclip, Annie Jacobson tells the little-known story of the race between American, British and Soviet intelligence to co-opt and exploit Nazi Germany's science and technology at the conclusion of World War II. At stake was military supremacy and a leg up in the looming Cold War. Under no circumstances could this knowledge be allowed to fall into Soviet hands.

As the war drew to a close, the allies discovered lists of Germany's top scientists in a toilet in Bonn, in a scientists' house outside Hannover and thumb-tacked on the wall in a V-2 factory.

The ethical dilemma was this: should Nazi scientists be prosecuted as war criminals or hired and exploited? Operation Paperclip solved this problem by ignoring and/or sanitizing the war crime records of the most valuable scientists and shipping them to America. Many were ultimately fast tracked for U.S. citizenship. The name Operation Paperclip referred to the paper clips that were attached to the dossiers of "the most "troublesome cases." These troublesome cases included mass murderers, human slavers and perverted doctors who performed dangerous medical experiments on human victims.

Ultimately, more than 1,600 Germans (including many ardent Nazis and known war criminals) were secretly recruited to develop armaments, including chemical, biological and rocket weapon systems. The best known among these scientists were Werner von Braun and Walter Dornberger, whose V1 and V2 rockets (constructed in tunnels by slave laborers) rained death and destruction on English cities and who subsequently led the American space program to the moon.

In a top secret memo titled "Exploitation of German Scientists in Science and Technology in the United States," the U.S.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I didn't expect this book to be as interesting and captivating as it turned out to be. Well written;though a bit prolix and sometimes in minute details; it is never boring, and there is much additional and recent information on the ex-Nazis employed in American military and scientific endeavours; Van Braun being the stellar example, though one of many.
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Format: Hardcover
Fascinating, I don't know why people read fictional spy novels when well written accounts of real life events have all the twist and turns that make real life stories so much more engaging. I thought I knew a lot about this period but this book was a revelation, you won't be disappointed. P.S. Great fodder for the anti government conspiracy guys.
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Format: Hardcover
What no reviewer seems to have pointed out is the apparent superiority of German universities such as those at Goettingen and Tuebingen, whose scientific graduates, while no more intelligent than their U.S. or British counterparts, were light-years ahead in military applications of physics and chemistry. No other country's scientists were capable of producing the V-2 rockets or -- Sputnik's German creators not excepted -- satellites. German exchange students in our high schools regularly report that they aren't being taught anything that they haven't already learned. John J. McCloy's view that it was preferable to employ even virulently anti-Semitic Nazi scientists in our military-industrial complex rather than allow the Soviets to reap the advantages of their contributions is arguably cogent.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great read! Appalling abuse of government " For The People ", hasn't changed much since. No wonder the people of the US don't trust their government.
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