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Othello (Widescreen/Full Screen) (Bilingual) [Import]

3.9 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 66.09
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Product Details

  • Actors: Laurence Fishburne, Kenneth Branagh, Irène Jacob, Nathaniel Parker, Michael Maloney
  • Directors: Oliver Parker
  • Writers: Oliver Parker, William Shakespeare
  • Producers: David Barron, Jonathan Olsberg, Luc Roeg
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, DVD-Video, Full Screen, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • Release Date: Jan. 18 2000
  • Run Time: 123 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B00003OST5
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Product Description

Product Description

Shakespeare's classic tragedy of jealousy, deceit, conspiracy, & murder. Othello's great love for Desdemona proves to be too much to bear.
Genre: Feature Film-Drama
Rating: R
Release Date: 18-JAN-2000
Media Type: DVD

Amazon.ca

Oliver Parker, a stage and film actor (Hellraiser), made his directorial debut with this scaled-back version of Shakespeare's play about the paranoid Moor, Othello (Laurence Fishburne), and his manipulative friend, Iago (Kenneth Branagh). Parker gets the story so lean he starts running a little short on the author's subtext, and if it's possible to overemphasize the banality of Iago's scheming and Othello's malleability, he does so. The director throws out what is universal in the story and makes it all seem merely ordinary, human, and unfortunate, which is the opposite of what watching Shakespeare should be. In the end, it's hard to care what these characters have done to one another. Branagh's Iago is a little flat and unfocused, while Fishburne is excellent as a quieter Othello than we're accustomed to. With Irène Jacob (Red) as Desdemona. --Tom Keogh --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
I've always been a fan of Kenneth Branagh and both his acting and directing abilities. However, in the film interpretation of "Othello," I was blown away by how well he fit the role of Iago. In the play, Iago has to be two-faced all the time. He shows one side of him to one person, and another side to another. In the film, Iago works very hard to keep up his appearance with all the different characters. No character sees more than one side of him, and his plots are kept to himself. Iago is an actor, and Branagh had to perform his part and I think he did it incredibly. While talking to Othello, his facial reactions would visibly change when Othello looked the other way; the audience saw glimpses of Iago's true motives, but they were always hidden from Othello. It was incredible how quickly the transition from a sinister expression to a loving and loyal expression was made. In one scene, Iago and Othello are hugging, and Iago's face reflects contempt as soon as his face is beside Othello's face.
Iago's changes aren't simply when Othello is around, but the changes are the same for when Iago deals with Roderigo. In the scenes with Roderigo, Iago has to perform doubly hard because he's being partially truthful with Iago. He's showing part of his true motives, but he still has to hide them to some extent to convince Roderigo to do his bidding. The scenes between Branagh and Michael Maloney probably impressed me the most. Roderigo may have been gullible or easily convinced, but Iago was still convincing and persuasive enough to move Roderigo from absolute hatred and distrust to absolute loyalty and thankfulness. In one scene, Roderigo is threatening to kill Iago and by the end of the scene, they're hugging and Iago can barely convince Roderigo to leave his side.
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Format: DVD
Everyone who loves Shakespeare or is learning about Shakespeare should see this movie. I studied Shakespeare in College and wish I had seen this movie back then. I plan on letting my children watch Othello in a few years when they are old enough to study and appreciate Shakespeare's work.
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Format: VHS Tape
The best Shakespeare films are watchable again and again - those of Olivier, Orson Welles, the BBC Shakespeare of the late &0's/early 80's - they allow you to savor the poetry and performance. I like this version of Othello because of that. It's very watchable. The direction corrects a major problem of the Branagh films - Branagh's overuse of extreme closeups, which make watching his Hamlet (fine on the first few goes) so tedious on repeated viewings (he used less of them in his brilliant Henry V). Hence the director of this Othello helps Branagh the actor turn in one of his finest performances - because we're not always two inches from his face. Fishbourne as Othello is quite strong, too. The director helps him turn in an above average performance in a difficult role which is no longer socially acceptable to be performed by white actors "blacking up," as the stage term is. The supporting cast is mostly made up of veteran stage actors - you will notice many faces from other Shakespeare movies - and is very strong. Irene Worth looks lovely - just as Desdemona should. I don't see why so many reviewers complain that text is cut from this film - text is cut from almost ALL Shakespeare films - Gibson's Hamlet, Olivier's and Welles' versions, Branagh's too (except for Hamlet). If you like the story and the play this is a good performance to watch. Orson Welles' Othello is very dramatic, too, with a fine supporting cast of Scotch actors with wonderful accents. Olivier's Othello, one of the last of the "black up" versions in a tradion stretching back hundreds of years, has much more of the play if you're worried about the cutting. Anthony Hopkins BBC Shakespeare has almost the whole play but Hopkins performance is a little too mad (and maddening!) for some - it's also a "black up." Look out for Trevor Nunn's recent British production which was released briefly on video in the UK if you have a multiplayer VCR (I recommend Samsung's model).
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Format: DVD
Jealousy can ruin lives and can come from years of pain or from a place indiscernible. William Shakespeare was fascinated by jealousy and what it can do to relationships. Shakespeare used his fascination with jealousy to create a gripping tragedy. Othello is the story of two lovers ruined by an outsider consumed by jealousy. Iago, motivated by material and personal gain as well as the sheer love of evil, breeds mistrust between Othello and Desdemona. After much work, Iago brings Othello to the breaking point. He kills Desdemona because he thinks she has betrayed him. He discovers the truth only when it is too late, and atones for his sins by taking his own life. Oliver Parker's 1995 film version of Othello opens in an obvious Venetian setting in the evening. The film is set during the Renaissance and resembles what the story would have looked like if it had really happened in Shakespeare's day. The settings and costumes are entirely realistic and elaborate. The film is done for all audiences and Parker tries to balance action and dialogue. In trying to balance the content of the film, Parker took liberties with the text, changing almost as much as he could while still keeping the title of Shakespeare's play. In discussing the film, Jack Garner claims Parker "eliminated some 50 percent of the original play." Though this may be true, how the story works is the most important, and Brian Webster of the Apollo Movie Guide says, "in this film it does." Though all of Shakespeare's lines may not be in Parker's film version, the poetic form of Shakespeare's iambic pentameter was kept in nearly every line. Still, the delivery of the lines is crucial to the flow of a Shakespearian play. Kenneth Branagh did a masterful job delivering the lines of Iago.Read more ›
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