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Paradise Lost Paperback – Jan 1 2005

4.5 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: W W Norton & Co Inc (Np); 3rd ed. edition (Jan. 1 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393924289
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393924282
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 3.3 x 21.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 590 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #124,992 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

“In this landmark edition, teachers will discover a powerful ally in bringing the excitement of Milton’s poetry and prose to new generations of students.”—William C. Dowling, Rutgers University
 
“This magnificent edition gives us everything we need to read Milton intelligently and with fresh perception.”—William H. Pritchard, Amherst College --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Publisher

12 black and white engravings from the first illustrated edition, 1688 --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Beautiful volume and the slipcover is an attractive touch. Complete and unabridged so that you can enjoy the original poetry the way it was meant to be read. The illustrations just add to the vivid mental imagery that Milton composes. Highly Recommend!
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Format: Audio CD
Let's face it. Reading Milton is no cakewalk. Oscar Wilde once said a writer was a "prose Milton" then added, "but so is Milton." That's why Anton Lesser's reading is genius. It's so genius, it demonstrates the genius of Milton. Laura Paton can't quite match Anton in his Shakespearean crispness and demonic force, but she only reads the few speeches of Eve.
Yes, it's an abridged version. But when they say abridged, they barely mean it. Whole books are included on the three (THREE!) CDs and ones that aren't read fully are here in Milton's own summaries. I recommend getting the NORTON CRITICAL EDITION OF PARADISE LOST to read along with this (although everything that's read is included in a booklet that also comes (!) with the CDs. The Norton Crit has the full text (should you want it) along with good footnotes and essays.
This is all so well done and so mindbogglingly cheap for how long it is (four hours!), I'm a little baffled why I hadn't heard of it before. Every English teacher will tell you that Milton should be read aloud. So why not have Anton Lesser do it for you? He does it so dern well.
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Format: Audio CD
This is an ABRIDGED VERSION.
Amazon.com does not mention that anywhere in the promotion.
What's on the CD is good. But there are whole 'Books' (Chapters) 'paraphrased'.
It's like buying the 13 oz. pound of coffee.
Coffee's great, it's just not what was represented to be.
Worth 13.99, but know it's not the whole thing.
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Format: Paperback
Milton's Paradise Lost is a masterpiece, but that does not mean it is easily read or that it is appealing to modern tastes.

The level of English in this poem is absolutely insane, and Milton floods the pages with his learnedness and his poetic writerly powers, which are near unbelievable. I don't think there's any question that there's some self-indulgence here - this work goes on too long by modern standards and some passages are difficult to enjoy. Sometimes you're just ready for Milton to be done with this and get on to the next thing. And Eve gets the lion's share of the blame for the ultimate failure of course; there's a level of condescension towards women there that will get your feminist side uppity and irritated.

But reading Satan's rebellious speeches and the incredible imaginative power of Milton's description of the war in heaven between the rebel angels and the good . . . there's passages here that have yet to fade and probably never will. When you consider that Milton was eyeing other great epics from the distant past while he was doing this, its no wonder he pulled out all the stops and tried to find just where his limits were.

So read in small pieces, because the language is incredible and dense and difficult to absorb more than 200 to 300 lines at a time.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Probably the most argued piece of material from the past. Paradise Lost can be the most confusing piece to read, but its most certainly making its point clear. It acts as a rebel against most religious teachings and It may serve a great way for someone to expand their grasp of many eastern-world concepts such as 'no evil or good... theirs only grey areas', but this interpretation is open for debate.

The oxford version is a vastly superior edition with a lot of annotations added by Stephen Orgel and Jonathan Goldberg. Awesome stuff. Great for beginners to Milton's work.
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By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAME on Feb. 8 2006
Format: Paperback
Of Man's first disobedience and the fruit
Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste
Brought death into the world and all our woe,
With loss of Eden, till on greater Man
Restore us and regain the blissful seat
Sing, Heavenly Muse...
Not a lot people know that 'Paradise Lost' has as a much lesser known companion piece 'Paradise Regained'; of course, it was true during Milton's time as it is today that the more harrowing and juicy the story, the better it will likely be remembered and received.
This is not to cast any aspersion on this great poem, however. It has been called, with some justification, the greatest English epic poem. The line above, the first lines of the first book of the poem, is typical of the style throughout the epic, in vocabulary and syntax, in allusiveness. The word order tends toward the Latinate, with the object coming first and the verb coming after.
Milton follows many classical examples by personifying characters such as Death, Chaos, Mammon, and Sin. These characters interact with the more traditional Christian characters of Adam, Eve, Satan, various angels, and God. He takes as his basis the basic biblical text of the creation and fall of humanity (thus, 'Paradise Lost'), which has taken such hold in the English-speaking world that many images have attained in the popular mind an almost biblical truth to them (in much the same way that popular images of Hell owe much to Dante's Inferno). The text of Genesis was very much in vogue in the mid-1600s (much as it is today) and Paradise Lost attained an almost instant acclaim.
John Milton was an English cleric, a protestant who nonetheless had a great affinity for catholic Italy, and this duality of interests shows in much of his creative writing as well as his religious tracts.
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