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Patrick Roy: Winning, Nothing Else Hardcover – Sep 23 2008

5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley (Sept. 23 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470156163
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470156162
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 4.5 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 898 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #516,061 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From the Back Cover

WINNING. NOTHING ELSE.

In the early 1970s, a young Patrick Roy laced up his hockey skates for the very first time, like thousands of other kids. Thirty years later, he stands as one of the winningest goaltenders of all time. His indomitable will to win and his focus on being the very best brought him four Stanley Cups, three Conn Smythe trophies, three Vézina trophies, and many more individual honors. An incredible hockey talent who was instrumental in changing the very art of goaltending, Roy's success was driven as much by determination and perseverance as by talent.

Patrick Roy: Winning. Nothing Else. brings to life Patrick Roy's phenomenal career, and unmasks his more mysterious personal side. Michel Roy, the father of this great sports legend, reveals what makes Patrick tick, taking us behind the scenes and into the family life of one of the greatest goaltenders of all time: his will to win; the art of protecting the goal; how he revolutionized goaltending by helping to develop and popularize the butterfly style; his role models and inspiration; his relationships with teachers, teammates, and the media, as well as with coaches, agents and other players.

The author holds nothing back as he reveals with drama, tension, and emotion, the blunders, faults and difficulties of the famous goalie, including the heartbreaking move away from Montreal that nearly broke Patrick Roy's spirit. Patrick Roy reveals the man behind the mask-the hopes and disappointments, triumphs and failures, and the all too human side of a man whom many consider the greatest goaltender in the history of hockey.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Born in Québec City in 1942, Michel Roy had a distinguished career with the Québec Government until 1996, holding several senior management positions over 26 years, including Deputy Minister of Tourism, Deputy Minister of Communications, and the Québec Government's Representative in Chicago for twelve Midwest states. He is also an accomplished jazz musician and composer, and is currently Chair of Telefilm Canada.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Format: Hardcover
Being a lifelong Habs fan, this was my guy. Of course, there's been so many in Habs lore like LaFleur, Richard, Beliveau and so many more. All those names were just legends that I never had a chance to see. Roy captured our hearts and imaginations in 1986.

This book was truly a treat with the insight on how Roy's technique changed the faced of goaltending forever and especially his love and respect for the game. His first training with the Canadiens, his cups in Montreal and his departure are covered plus his career in Colorado are only some of the subjects mentioned in this book.

His perseverance is the message that retained the most from this book. A great read for Habs/Avs fans and hockey fans alike.
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great book, a must read
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The real story
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9e26d024) out of 5 stars 22 reviews
HASH(0x9e126bb8) out of 5 stars Beware. Good Goalie, Biased Author. Jan. 26 2016
By Scott C. Holstad - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There are some who consider Patrick Roy to be the best goaltender in the history of the NHL. I’m not one of them. But I do think he’s one of the best, and perhaps the best if you go by some statistics. For instance, Roy played in more games than any other goalie in history. He won more playoff games than any other goalie in history, not even close. He won four Stanley Cups and three Vezina Trophies. All really good statistics. But he played from 1984 to 2003, 19 years. And while he was named to 11 All Star teams (why not 15, 16, or 17?), he was named First Team All Star only four times and Second Team All Star only twice. I think that’s pretty telling. And even though three Vezina Trophies for best goalie in the league is pretty impressive, are you telling me that the best goalie in HISTORY could only win three in NINETEEN years and he’s still the greatest ever? No, I don’t believe it. Even though this book sings his praises and, apparently, so do many other people, evidently not enough of his peers and NHL management thought highly enough of him to honor him while he played so that says a lot to me. And even though both Montreal and Colorado retired his jersey after he played for both teams and even though he made the Hall of Fame, I consider him to be merely one of the greatest goalies ever, although I hesitate to say who’s the best. Perhaps I would put him up with Billy Smith and Ken Dryden, among others. Grant Fuhr, to a far lesser degree. Some of the older goalies from previous eras, too, no doubt.

The main problem with this book is it’s written by his father, who is a Quebec government official, not a sports writer or journalist, and certainly not objective. And to make matters more irritating, the first part of the book seems more intent upon describing the author’s own life and career rather than Patrick’s boyhood and beginnings. It’s rather hubristic. Eventually, though, Michel Roy settles down and starts telling Patrick’s story and it’s startling grim to start out with. His entire minor league career is ugly. He plays on horrible junior hockey teams, just wretched. And one thing I never understood is, while he was apparently decent, the few times his father listed his junior numbers, they weren’t that good, which his father attributed to his teammates’ ineptitude rather than his son’s, and so I never understood why Patrick went on to become considered the top junior goalie in the league at some point. His numbers sure didn’t reflect that and he sure never led his teams to winning seasons. Weird. Usually winners hoist their teams on their backs and lead their teams to winning seasons. Not Roy.

Finally, he got invited to Montreal’s camp. He barely spoke English and had to play mostly in non-Quebec cities for the first time. It was difficult. He didn’t last and was sent back down, but the following year was back. His (real) rookie year in 1985-86 was good, but not great. But when Montreal made the playoffs, something happened and he caught fire and never stopped. He led the Canadiens to a Stanley Cup win and was named MVP of the series, which was pretty awesome for a rookie. And so it began.

He had a series of difficulties with coaches in Montreal. During his first few seasons, for some reason, he was forced to share goaltending duties with another goalie, which was pretty humiliating, considering he was much better. There was a possible reason. In the juniors, he had hooked up with this young, new untraditional goalie coach who had helped him develop a new “butterfly” technique of goaltending, which the NHL had rarely seen and detested. His style was frowned upon and he was actually punished by numerous coaches for using his own style no matter how effective it was. It wasn’t until he had established himself with a new coach in Montreal, and with this goalie coach, that his career took off and he started winning lots of games and he started getting career lows in goals against averages.

His second year was a down year, but then he came back and established himself. His general manager was always messing with the team though, trading good players to get new players, messing with the chemistry. It was tough to repeat as Stanley Cup champions with that going on. Nonetheless, Roy won Vezina Trophies in 1989, 1990, and 1992. And he led Montreal to another Stanley Cup victory in 1993. However, the team and even some fans began to get somewhat disenchanted with Roy by then, for reasons I never entirely understood. He was making too much money and was standing up to a new jerk coach. Big deal. So they did the unthinkable and traded him to Colorado in 1995, their old Quebec Nordiques nemesis recently moved to the Rockies. Roy would have to start all over again.

By this time, Roy was married and had a couple of kids. One of my complaints about this book is his father mentions the fact that Patrick meets a pretty woman and starts seeing her. Later, surprise, they get married! Later, they apparently reproduce. The only time we actually see her at all is when they have a massive public fight on their front lawn in Colorado, which I thought was going to end their marriage, but which evidently did not. In fact, Michel Roy didn’t delve very much into Patrick’s inner being and psyche very much at all, other than to assert that he wanted to play and win more than anything and anyone else at all. Over and over again, he beats that into your head. It gets pretty repetitive.

Whatever the case, Roy adapts to Colorado pretty quickly. His coach is his old agent in Quebec. He leads the team to a Stanley Cup win his first season there and becomes a huge celebrity in that state, according to his father, bigger than any other athlete in the history of Denver or Colorado, including John Elway, which I personally find ridiculous and impossible to believe. Utterly impossible. Roy kept putting up good numbers and Colorado eventually traded for aging superstar Raymond Bourque, who would likely be a Hall of Famer but had never won a Stanley Cup. The team decided to dedicate themselves to winning one for him, for some reason, and Roy made it his obsession. And they did in Bourque’s last year, 2001, when Roy won his third Conn Smythe award for playoff MVP while winning his fourth Stanley Cup. He then retired in 2003. After his retirement, he got involved in coaching junior hockey in Quebec and is now the coach of the Colorado Avalanche, his old team.

This isn’t a bad book. At times, it’s fairly interesting. But I’ve read many better sports bios, as I’ve read a lot of them, and I’ve read better hockey bios. As I mentioned, I don’t think it helped that Patrick’s father wrote this. He really should have had an unrelated professional write this. It would have been more objective and written better with more and better information about the man himself, I’m guessing. Still, if you’re a fan of Roy, you’ll probably like it. If you’re a fan of Montreal or Colorado, you’ll probably like it. Even if you’re simply a hockey fan, it’s possible you’ll probably like it to some degree, like me. Otherwise, I’d probably avoid it. Cautiously recommended, but obviously only for hockey fans. No point in reading it otherwise.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9e67d4e0) out of 5 stars A father's view of his son, the goalie Dec 15 2013
By WDX2BB - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Sometimes books center around trade-offs.

For example, "Patrick Roy."

The author of the book is Michael Roy, and it's not a coincidence that the two last names match. Michael is the father of Patrick, one of the greatest goalies in hockey history.

Michael is going to be privy to all sorts of information about his son that few others know about. That's particularly true, naturally, when it comes to his childhood.

It's also going to be one-sided in terms of criticism. Would you expect your father to be any different? Of course not. So it's easy to guess what you are getting in this biography.

Roy's story is fairly well known in hockey circles. After growing up in the Quebec area, he worked his way up the hockey ladder -- mostly by playing on some really bad teams. There's nothing like facing shot after shot with little chance of winning. But he received his reward when he was drafted in the third round by the Montreal Canadiens. In hindsight, that's one of the all-time great steals in draft history.

From there, Roy came to the NHL for keeps in the 1985-86 season and essentially helped the Canadiens steal a Stanley Cup in his rookie season. It was much the same in 1993, when Montreal came out of nowhere to win again. Roy maintained that high standard for the rest of his career.

Roy's playing career did have the proverbial second act from there. After a publicized fight with his coach in Montreal, Roy was traded to the Colorado Avalanche. There, all Roy did was win two more Stanley Cups and set an NHL record for regular season wins.

It's often fun to read an "inside" account of a superstar's life -- what he goes through from day to day, what big games were like, etc. Roy also gives lots of details about the trade to Colorado, and tells about the loss by Team Canada in the 1998 Olympics in Nagano.

The book was first written in French, and Charles Phillips does some good work in the translation department. There are some French phrases that go untranslated, as well as long portions of Patrick's Hall of Fame acceptance speech. No big deal. It would have been nice to catch words like Buffalo Sabers instead of Sabres or Mark Crawford instead of Marc, but it's tough to know where the fault lies there.

All of the patting of Patrick's back does get a little tiring after a while. There's one other problem with the book: its length. This checks in at 500 pages or so, and that's a great deal of detail. It takes until page 117 just for him to get drafted.

It's always nice to get Roy's side of the story down on paper, just like it is about any superstar. But a book like this is usually loved only by those who love the subject. You can tell by some of the reviews here that some of his many fans checked in here. "Patrick Roy" is part of the puzzle, but just a part of it. Maybe someday we'll learn more when a second book comes out about his coaching days, including his time with the Avalanche now.
HASH(0x9e67d3b4) out of 5 stars Incredible perspective into a true warrior March 20 2013
By Ford Lautenschlager - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is an excellent read detailing the mind and character of one of history's greatest athletes. The detail provided about Roy's development and journey to the NHL is wonderful. This book does a fantastic job not only looking at Roy but at the evolution of the game of hockey and Roy's role in that evolution. As an Avalanche fan I was hoping to see more of the details and insight into Roy's career in Colorado and to see how he adapted on a personal level to such a radically different franchise. Obviously his play remained impeccable, but I'm curious as to how he competed and became comfortable in Colorado and how he felt on the experience of playing with the Abs. I would have liked to have seen more about his final two cup and the playoff leading u p to them. The playoffs leading to his first two cup wins were told with such details that it really drew me into the moment, I would have liked the same with the last two.

Excellent book, makes me want to rush out to find an Avalanche Roy Jersey for sale!
HASH(0x9e67d4c8) out of 5 stars A Wonderful Biography from an Interesting Perspective March 13 2011
By D. Buxman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As a hockey fan, I was excited to read about one of the greatest players in the history of the NHL. As the parent of young athletes, I was intrigued at the prospect of reading Patrick Roy's story from the perspective of his father. While I expected that he would gloss over some of St. Patrick's more controversial aspects, such was not the case. This is a pretty balanced look at a great athlete, who made some mistakes along the way. This is one of the best hockey biographies that I have ever read. The writing style is fluid and some of the descriptions are actually quite beautiful. I learned a great deal about Patrick, that I had never known before (he had a long history of playing on terrible teams before he became a pro), and I also learned of his proud French-Canadian heritage (along with a French-Canadian curse word). I couldn't put this book down. It was excellent.
By Sebastien Lessard - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Being a lifelong Habs fan, this was my guy. Of course, there's been so many in Habs lore like LaFleur, Richard, Beliveau and so many more. All those names were just legends that I never had a chance to see. Roy captured our hearts and imaginations in 1986.

This book was truly a treat with the insight on how Roy's technique changed the faced of goaltending forever and especially his love and respect for the game. His first training with the Canadiens, his cups in Montreal and his departure are covered plus his career in Colorado are only some of the subjects mentioned in this book.

His perseverance is the message that retained the most from this book. A great read for Habs/Avs fans and hockey fans alike.


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