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Pawn/ Frankincense V4 Paperback – Sep 27 1992

4.7 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 699 pages
  • Publisher: Random House UK; New edition edition (Sept. 27 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099949202
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099949206
  • Product Dimensions: 17.3 x 11.2 x 4.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 363 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,661,432 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From the Inside Flap

For the first time Dunnett's "Lymond Chronicles are available in the United States in quality paperback editions.
Pawn in Frankincense is the fourth in the legendary "Lymond Chronicles. Somewhere within the bejeweled labyrinth of the Ottoman empire, a child is hidden. Now his father, Francis Crawford of Lymond, soldier of fortune and the exiled heir of Scottish nobility, is searching for him while ostensibly engaged on a mission to the Turkish Sultan. At stake is a pawn in a cutthroat game whose gambits include treason, enslavement, and murder. With a Foreword by the author. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Dorothy, Lady Dunnett, was born in Dunfermline, Scotland in 1923, the only daughter of an engineer, Alexander Halliday, and his wife Dorothy. Whilst gifted academically and musically, she was not encouraged to further her talents by attending university, and instead joined the civil service in Scotland as an assistant press officer. In 1946, she married Alastair Dunnett, who was at the time the chief press officer to the Secretary of State for Scotland. He went on to become editor of 'The Scotsman' newspaper, whilst she later worked on a statistics handbook for the Board of Trade. After a brief spell in Glasgow, the couple settled in Edinburgh where their home became a centre for hospitality and entertaining, mostly in support of Scottish art and culture. Dunnett had also taken evening classes at the Edinburgh College of Art and the Glasgow School of Art, and from 1950 onwards she established a prominent career as a portrait painter, being exhibited at both the Royal Scottish Academy and the Royal Academy. She was also an accomplished sculptress. Her interest in writing developed during the 1950's. Her own tastes took her to historical novels and it was her husband who eventually suggested she write one of her own, after she had complained of running out of reading material. The result was 'The Game of Kings', an account of political and military turmoil in sixteenth-century Scotland. Whilst turned down for publication in the UK, it was eventually published in the USA where it became an instant best seller. Other titles, such as the 'Lymond Chronicles' and 'House of Niccolo' series followed and which established her international reputation. She also successfully turned her hand to crime, with the 'Johnson Johnson' series. He is an eccentric artist, famous for bifocals, and of course amateur detective. All of the titles in the series somehow also feature the yacht 'Dolly', despite ranging widely in location from Scotland, to Ibiza, Rome, Marrakesh, Canada, Yugoslavia, Madeira and The Bahamas. There is plenty of sailing lore for the enthusiast, but not so much it detracts from the stories genre; crime. Each of them is told by a woman whose profession explains her role in the mystery and we learn very little about Johnson himself, save for the fact he is somewhat dishevelled in appearance. Dorothy Dunnett somehow fitted in her many careers and voluntary work, along with supporting her husband's endeavours, yet still found the time to correspond widely with her readers from all over the world, and was often delighted to meet with them personally. She held the rare distinction of having a Dorothy Dunnett Readers Association formed during her lifetime and collaborated with it as much as possible. A writer who has been described as one of great wit, charm, and humanity, yet whose work displayed toughness, precision, and humour, she was appointed to an OBE in 1992 for services to literature and became Lady Dunnett in 1995 when her husband was knighted. She died in 2001, being survived by her two sons; Ninian and Mungo. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Pawn in Frankincense opens up shortly after the end of The Disorderly Knights, as Jerrott and Phillipa track down Lymond on his search to find Francis' child, stolen by renegade Knight Graham Reed Malett and hidden somewhere in the heart of the Ottoman Empire. Francis uses his position as an emissary of France delivering gifts to Suleiman the Magnificent as an entrée into the mysterious world of the east as he and his companions continue their desperate search for Lymond's son. However, the deliciously evil Graham's schemes lead them on from one false lead to another, as the web is spun to bring Francis and troops further into Graham's evil web. Nothing and no one is as they seem, and the author throws many red herrings and surprises into her tale and eventually we discover that there are two blond, blue eyed children being sought. One child is Francis', who is father of the other?

Although separated, Lymond and his followers all end up in Constantinople, as Graham's plots come to fruition and Lymond, Jerrott, Archie and the mysterious Marthe with the striking resemblance to Lymond begin the fight of their lives in a real life chess game with deadly consequences for any who are "captured", and Francis battles to maintain his wits against the deadly addiction Graham's schemes have unknowingly afflicted him with.

As with the first three books in the series, Francis Crawford is a fascinating hero, and is as suave, debonair, flawed and fascinating as only a 16th Century version of James Bond could be. This book is filled with non-stop action and suspense and ends with quite a big surprise of a cliffhanger which will send the reader reaching for the next book in the series, The Ringed Castle. A solid five stars and my favorite so far in the series.
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Format: Paperback
By far the most baroque episode of Dorothy Dunnett's outrageously baroque romantic adventure series, this book depicts the final conflict between Lymond and Gabriel, now a renegade in the service of Islam - but only insofar as Islam can serve his own ambitions. Can Francis survive his encounter with the golden god and save all the innocents sucked into the morass of political and personal intrigue? Mrs Dunnett is far too clever to make it a foregone conclusion; but with her usual skill, she gives every other character his or her due. The whole structure of the tale is cleverly entwined in the political and social life of Europe and the Near East at the time, giving us at one sitting a heartwrenching, dramatic romance and a very palatable history lesson. Tragedy and betrayal strike at the most unexpected moments, and relationships develop in directions I, for one, didn't anticipate. The book would be worth reading just for Lymond and Malett, but it offers much more. And it couldn't be filmed, because the actors who could step into these two pairs of shoes simply don't exist.
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Format: Paperback
Well, this is the fourth book by Dunnett that I've read (the three earlier books in the Lymond series being the others). Quite simply, Dunnett gets better with each book! Her style continually reminds me of Dumas. History, adventure, great characters - all mix together to form a gripping story. I couldn't put it down last night as I finished it. Most impressive to me is the way she is "realistic" (within, of course, the fictional world she created). By that, I mean that her characters, good and evil, make tough choices. Good sometimes doesn't triumph completely, bad people sometimes come out on top, and loyal friends sometimes pay the price for our heros adventures. This is no fairy tale. A few times, I was actually shocked by the story as it progressed (especially at the end of this book). All in all, a great read if you like historical/fictional mixes. I especially enjoyed being introduced to a world I knew nothing about (ancient Turkey and its empire).
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Format: Paperback
A friend lent me her much loved copies of "The Disorderly Knights" and then "Queen's Play" and I've been hooked on this series ever since. It has a richness of prose and depth of character that set it apart from the average hero story. It also has an intriguing plot line and an interesting view of Renaissance politics. All six books fit smoothly together with a tasteful use of foreshadowing. "Pawn in Frankincense" is my favorite book of the series. The secondary characters are developed to a level unsurpassed in any of Dunnett's other books. The locations feel realistic and the emotional draw of this book is incredible. I would recommend starting at the beginning (with A Game of Kings) instead of in the middle and out of order, as I did. While each book is self-contained, there are enough references to previous incidents to make following the series order worthwhile. This is the series I always recommend when a meet someone who TRULY loves to read. I can't say enough good things about it.
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Format: Paperback
What can I say that everyone else has not? This book and this series is the best I have ever read. I am just finishing my fifth time reading this book and still find it to be my favorite. I always hesitate to read this book because of the Chess game at the end, but by the time I get to that part of the book I can't skip it because it is such an intrigal part. A friend of mine who has read the books and I have debated over who found Lymond's son, Lymond or Philipa. Each of us has our own opinion and reasons for it. This is the main reason why I like this series so much, Ms. Dunnett doesn't explain everything, she makes the reader work at it and come to their own conclusions. For example, when, in Pawn a character in the Game of Kings is mentioned, Ms. Dunnett doesn't stop the flow of the book to remind everyone who this person is but lets the reader either figure it out from the context of the discussion or go back to the prior book to look it up. This is definately not an easy read, but these books are the only ones I read every few years and each time I read them I get more out of them. Thank you Dorothy Dunnett!
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