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Peace Pipe Dreams: The Truth about Lies about Indians Paperback – Unabridged, Oct 3 2014

4.6 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre (Oct. 3 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1771000406
  • ISBN-13: 978-1771000406
  • Product Dimensions: 14.4 x 1.7 x 21.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 249 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #92,755 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

About the Author

Darrell Dennis is a playwright, broadcaster, actor and comedian. His one-man show Tales of an Urban Indian was nominated for two Dora Awards and was produced for multiple tours across North America. His feature film adaptation of Tales was one of thirteen international screenplays accepted to the Sundance Screenwriters Lab. He is also known for his role in two CBC TV series; he played Frank Fencepost on The Rez, and Brian Potter on Northwood. Dennis also co-wrote and hosted the groundbreaking CBC Radio program Revision Quest, which ran for four seasons and won the prestigious New York Festival Award. As a comedian, he has performed in televised galas at the Winnipeg Comedy Festival and the Just For Laughs Festival. Dennis currently lives in Los Angeles, California.


Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoyed the book, some very funny parts. I did feel in places that the humour provided a thin cover for some valid anger. An interesting modern perspective. Worth reading. Looking forward to more from this author.
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Format: Paperback
Darrell Dennis’ award-winning book Peace Pipe Dreams is an entertaining and informative read. In it, the author effectively refutes prevailing misconceptions about aboriginal peoples with a fascinating blend of history, humor and irony, but never bitterness.

A status Indian from the Secwepemc Nation in the interior of British Columbia, Dennis currently lives and works in Los Angeles. He is a playright, actor, radio host and comedian. His one-man show Tales of an Urban Indian received several award nominations and was adapted for a feature film.

In Peace Pipe Dreams, Dennis uses pop culture examples, personal anecdotes and a cutting wit to weave historical fact with current events to entertain, inform and provide a convincing, readable overview of First Nations issues and why they matter today. In the process he dispels many misconceptions about aboriginals, including:

• Contrary to urban legend, Aboriginals do not get free pickup trucks;
• Native peoples are not genetically pre-disposed to alcoholism;
• Tax exemptions for aboriginals are limited in scope and apply mostly on reserves;
• Native religion doesn’t involve worshipping rocks and, in fact, relates primarily to being in balance with nature;
• Indians should not be judged “good” or “bad” by the length of their hair;
• Indian sports mascots are definitely not OK with the majority of aboriginal people; and
• Native reserves are not floating in federal money and are no more fiscally irresponsible (or in need of a financial administrator) than many Canadian provinces and municipalities.
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Format: Paperback
Gord had read this book a couple weeks ago and said it was interesting so I thought I'd check it out.

The author is a First Nations Canadian comedian, actor, screenwriter and radio personality from the Secwepemc Nation in the interior of British Columbia. He has written this book to describe the truths and untruths about the First Nations.

The chapters include:
Native Names - there was a lot of coverage on what is the politically correct way to refer to the First Nations
Native Perceptions: The European Point of View
Native Perceptions: The North American Point of View
Natives and Alcohol
Religion & Residential Schools
Treaties
Native Land
Native Government
The Future

There is a lot of serious indepth information but the writing style is funny and sardonic. You either enjoy his sense of humour or you don't. There is a lot of history and it's a definitely a book you want to read it you want the real story about the First Nations. It gave me a better understanding of their situation ... they have definitely been ripped off over the centuries which is sad.

One thing that bugged me was I came across some information that was incorrect. The author said the War of 1812 was between Canada and France. Wrong!! It was between Great Britain and the U.S. When I read that, it made me start to wonder what else was incorrect in the book and I lost confidence in the author.

Blog review post: http://www.teenaintoronto.com/2016/01/book-peace-pipe-dreams-truth-about-lies.html
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Format: Paperback
Who are these people we live amongst. They live in towns, in cities and on reserves. I say that we, the foreign arrivals to this land, live among them even though they are the smaller population. We used to call them Indians but now they are referred to as First Nations, Metis and Inuit, or by the proper name of their Nation. They were here first and choose to share their land with us, the newcomers.

With this being true, why is it that so many Canadians know so little about our neighbours and much of what we claim to know is wrong. What little I learned in school was from fourth grade and comprised the role that some un-named Indians helped Laura Secord carry word to General Brock about an invasion across the Niagara River. Wow, not much. Probably something was discussed about teepees and long houses and buffalo, but that was the end of it.

Talk about inadequate.

As an adult, I'm much wider read and have learned quite a bit, but still feel that I am missing the majority of this significant history. Darrell Dennis's book Peace Pipe Dreams: The Truth about Lies About Indians has cleared up a lot of mis-information and gaps that I had. This book should be required reading in all Canadian civics classes as well as for all persons desiring to become Canadian citizens.

It is well written, with clear explanations and examples where required. Topics that could have been heavy and sleep inducing are kept to manageable bites of information. The depth of details should be suitable for most readers. Source information is cited for those wanting further information.

Peace Pipe Dreams answered many questions I had about the First Nations and many more that I didn't even know I needed to ask.
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