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Penguin Classics Adventures Of Don Quixote Mass Market Paperback – Jan 1 1950

4.5 out of 5 stars 41 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 944 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classic; New impression edition (Jan. 1 1950)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140440100
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140440102
  • Product Dimensions: 12.5 x 3.8 x 19.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 544 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 41 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #665,157 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
What else can someone say about "Don Quixote"?

I have Pablo Picasso's pen and ink drawing of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza hanging on the wall. The windmills are on the horizon behind them.
Chasing the windmills. Everybody knows who did that, even if they never picked up the book. But if you have never read the book, you don't remember other things about the story.
You don't remember how the old man went insane when they walled up his library? You don't remember in "Don Quixote, Part Two," the old man and Sancho Panza at the printers reading about themselves in the new book titled "Don Quixote, Part Two"?
Sancho picks up the galley sheets and reads about themselves up tp the very point where they are at the printers reading about themselves. The author of those galley sheets is Miguel Cervantes, whom they have heard of and like very much.
Who can imagine characters in a novel approving of the author who created them? We had to wait five hundred years before Luigi Pirandello wrote something similar in his play, "Sic Characters In Search of an Author."
Sancho reads part of the new book entitled "Don Quixote, Part Two" by a different author. He shows it to the old man. It is to much for the old man, who drags Sancho out the door and away from that disturbing book by another author.
This out Borges Borges!
Jorge Luis Borges, the blind South American poet, wrote a small story about the real author of Don Quixote. It is very cute and amusing. Go buy Borges' book also.
"Don Quixote" is a very modern book. The story is simple. There are no hard parts in these pages, The is no chapter like The Grand Inquisitor chapter in that other book.
The Modern Library edition of "Don Quixote" has been on my shelves for about thirty years. Get this book and read it. It is required reading.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Miguel De Cervantes fought at the Battle of Lepanto, where the Spanish decisively defeated the Ottoman Empire. Cervantes, however, was imprisoned for several years by the Moors.
Reading Don Quixote this past winter, I was struck by how that experience is woven through Don Quixote. Part novel, part collection of tales, Don Quixote's world is one of flux and change. This world is the setting for many quests: Moors seeking true love and acceptance in Spain, enslaved Spaniards yearning for freedom, Don Quixote striving to disenchant his Dulcinea, and Sancho Panza looking for an island to govern.
Is the world being enchanted or drained of magic? Both readings are plausible. Don Quixote distrusts appearances, and we can't tell if he's genius or fool for doing so.
If this sounds highfalutin, let me add that this novel includes great slapstick that made me put down the book and laugh out loud. While there are some slow passages (maybe an abridgement would be best to read), they can be gotten through with a little effort. The best passages are priceless.
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By A Customer on July 20 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The definition of classic. Dostoyevsky considered Don Quixote the most beautiful of people and I cannot disagree. Cervantes wraps all things human into one book and almost always has you feeling every emotion all at once - slapstick humor, dark tragedy, dogged optimisim, dry realism, love, insanity, poetry vs utility, and wit, tons and tons of wit. If you read the information about Cervantes life you get more out of this book. You will see that this book is written about and from its author's soul, not a thought out plot. Disfigured through war and a hostage sitting in prison for the better part of his life, Cervantes knew what it meant to be taken in by the romance of war and how it contrasts with its harsh reality. He knew what love was and how it is related to "irrationality" or a poetic insanity that makes us human.
If I was approached by an alien who asked me to give it a description of the soul of a human, this is the book I would give it. At certain times in the book I laughed and on second readings I felt sorrow over the same part.
It is written in the 1400s, but is not a difficult read whatsoever. ...
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
O, Don Quixote de la Mancha, cream and flower of knight errantry! Your adventures and exploits are endlessly entertaining and edifying!
This is a novel which can be taken at its own pace, sprawling, epic - but which most likely you will take much faster. I began reading the novel following the most recent film adaptation with John Lithgow and Bob Hoskins. I have been engrossed, enthralled, and enchanted since I picked up this antique tome. "Don Quixote" is not simply A novel - it is THE novel. In Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, Cervantes gave, and continues to give two of the most beautifully rendered personalities, whom you come to know and treasure, and whose names will be "written in the book of fame for all future ages".
From the Duke and Duchess to the writer-convict Gines, to Sampson Carrasco and the priest, Cervantes portrays individuals, not just character-types, from all social backgrounds and contexts, enriching further the story of the Knight of the Sad Countenance and his faithful squire.
In terms of narrative, it is clear how "Don Quixote" influenced countless other works from Laurence Sterne's "Tristram Shandy" to Herman Melville's "The Confidence-Man". "Don Quixote" is very much a narrative concerned with its own existence as a text. From Cervantes continually reminding the reader of his own duty as the translator of Quixote's adventures from Benengeli, to the Don's own preoccupation in the novel's second half with an "unauthorized biography" of himself written by a hack, to the various interpolated stories throughout the novel - narrative awareness and attention to the ways in which narrative and language functions are fascinating components of this work.
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