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The Peripheral Hardcover – Oct 28 2014

4.3 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley (Oct. 28 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399158448
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399158445
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 3.8 x 23.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 739 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #42,828 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

Praise for The Peripheral

"Spectacular, a piece of trenchant, far-future speculation that features all the eyeball kicks of Neuromancer and all the maturity and sly wit of Spook Country. It’s brilliant." —Cory Doctorow

Praise for William Gibson

“To read Gibson is to read the present as if it were the future.” —The New York Times“Gibson’s radar is deftly tuned to the changes in the culture that many of us are missing.” —Milwaukee Journal Sentinel“One of the most visionary, original, and quietly influential writers currently working.” —The Boston Globe“Like Pynchon and DeLillo, Gibson excels at pinpointing the hidden forces that shape our world.” —Details

About the Author

William Gibson is the author of NeuromancerCount ZeroMona Lisa Overdrive, Burning Chrome, Virtual LightIdoruAll Tomorrow’s PartiesPattern RecognitionSpook CountryZero History, and Distrust That Particular Flavor. He lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, with his wife.

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4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I think this is Gibson's best ever. A murder mystery, a tense thriller, a meditation on the surveillance society, and what it might look like in the future, and a vision of kleptocracy and technology taken to its logical conclusion. It is written in a style that is spare, tight, terse, laconic. It is written in 124 short chapters. Each little saccade tightens the tension, drops new information like small seeds, and gradually rounds out the main characters until they become like a family we care about. On the one hand there are the klepto elites of future London, and on the other hand the untamed, slightly trashy, irresistlble denizens of an unnamed American county in the nearer future. And all of it centers around a young woman named Flynne. Her gift is an ability to move forward no matter what happens, and to see through the moral cloud of late pre-apocalyptic America. If you are a loyal Gibsonite your should appreciate this one. If you have never read him, this is a good place to start.
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Format: Hardcover
In a year that has seen an ample abundance of more or less routine dystopian near future speculative fiction novels – of which the least admirable was a highly touted debut novel about “word viruses” – William Gibson’s “The Peripheral” is an exceptional bit of literary fresh air. It represents the long overdue return of not only one of speculative fiction’s most important intellectuals, but also, one of the most noteworthy writers of our time, regardless of genre. Reading a William Gibson novel can be a difficult, and challenging, task, and his latest is no exception, since he takes readers on a whirlwind tour into the future twice; the first set approximately three to four decades into the future, and the other, the early 22nd Century. But it is a task well worth taking by the reader, since Gibson has some interesting things to say about time travel, robotics, nanotechnology, and corruption – corporate, financial and government – on a global scale, through a tale that is nearly as dark and depressing as the one recounted in “Neuromancer” - his award-winning debut novel that noted critic and fantasy writer Lev Grossman regards as the most important novel of our time – while relying on literary techniques introduced in “Virtual Light”, and especially, “Idoru”, and perfected in “Pattern Recognition”, “Spook Country” and “Zero History”, such as terse, often fragmented, sentences, brief chapters, and realistic dialogue that, for some readers, may be faint literary echoes of the hallucinatory prose written in his early “Sprawl Trilogy” novels “Neuromancer” and “Count Zero”.

“The Peripheral” is Gibson’s best work of speculative fiction since “Idoru”.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A little annoying how some of the plot pieces are in play right from the get go. It does take a little patience as it does take a few chapters to give a bit of explanation. It does work out fully in the end.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Like most of Gibson's works, it takes a bit to find your footing in this world. Worlds. You need to get a feel for the language, the textures of not one but two times, neither of them ours. But once you're invested in them, it's as rich a ride as any he's given.

The narrative here pivots around Flynn, a woman from somewhere not far out of our time witnessing something she wasn't supposed to, in an environment that she thought was only a game, but was in fact a version of her future. What follows is a really interesting story involving virtual time travel to unravel the mystery.

William Gibson continues to be my favourite author. He has this amazing knack for dialogue, for creating compelling characters and lush visual landscapes. As usual, I'm just sorry that I'm finished.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Begins like an initial examination of an impressionistic painting from a few inches away. As the novel develops your view clears gradually and the whole slowly develops into the intended view. Another enjoyable outing with W. Gibson
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Format: Hardcover
I liked the story line but didn't enjoy William Gibson's writing style. His sentences often didn't seem complete (missing/implied pronouns) and there were many others from which I could drive no meaning even after repeated readings.

The first one hundred or so pages I felt lost with no key to unlocking the secret code. A glossary of the authors invented terms/processes/items would have helped immensely. I would have given up early on if I hadn't been reading this for my local book club meeting. I gave up on trying to understand much of what Mr. Gibson was writing, and settle for following the basics of the plot line, which I did enjoy.

The story starts in some point after 2023 in the United States. Flynne Fisher is an ex-gamer, but just this once she agrees to sub for her brother and work his shift beta testing a game. Well, she does it again the next night and this time all doesn't go so well. Some one in the game is killed in a gruesome manner and she begins to question whether it really is a game.

The story skips back and forth between Flynne's time and a future time, about seventy years from them. In the future, Wilf Netherton has some involvement with the death that occurred and it's important to him to protect Flynne from any backlash from that event.

The character of Flynne is well developed and I found her down to earth and likable. She is very family oriented and ethical. She sticks to her morals even when large amounts of money are waved in front of her face. My other favourite character is Conner, a long time friend who is ex-military with multiple crippling war injuries. He's in your face, does what he needs to with no apologies.

This story made me ponder the role of technology in society.
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