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Pick Up Import

4.4 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Oct. 8 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Matad
  • ASIN: B00000K3KR
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews
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1. Pick Up
2. Randy Costanza
3. Dork At 12 O'Clock
4. That's What You Get With People Like That On Cruises Like These...
5. Oh Blimey!
6. The Burglars Are Coming!
7. Superfluity
8. Snappy & Cocky
9. Five Star Shamberg
10. Chris The Birthday Boy
11. Athens, Ohio
12. Escargot!
13. Another Tune Like 'Not Fade Away'
14. That'll Be $22.95

Product Description

Product Description

AKA Elisabeth Esselink. This Record is Made Entirely from Bootlegged Samples from Jazz, Classical and Pop/Rock Concerts.

Amazon.ca

The way that Elisabeth Esselink, aka Solex, creates her très moderne dance music is both disarmingly simple and ingenuous. ForPick Up, her second album, the songstress holed out underneath a second-hand record store in Amsterdam for three months, venturing out only to bootleg live concerts (classical, jazz, pop) on her hand-held tape recorder. To these samples--cut-up and cleverly dispersed--were added live drum pattens and a curiously disembodied female voice, plus a few off-kilter atmospheric noises. The result is bewitching and genuinely disorientating. Tracks like the chunky "Dork At 12 O'Clock" and bewildering "That'll Be $22.95" sound like a disco-fied, stilted take on Japanese high-voiced pop, with the surface gloss and sheen amplified to the nth degree. You could call Elisabeth the female Beck ... only she's way too original for easy comparisons. Excellent. --Everett True

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I am not really a fan of contemporary "electronic" music, but ever since I picked up (no pun intended) this CD on a whim a few weeks ago, it has not left my CD player. Solex is the most refreshing and original "band" that I have ever had the pleasure to hear, and having discovered them purely by accident just makes this CD all the more special.
Solex is definitely not just another pretentious "electronica" outfit putting out boring, repetitive techno beats with pseudo-hip samples bleeping and blooping all over the place. In fact, this barely sounds like an "electronic" album at all. Elisabeth Esselink has an amazing talent for "playing" her samples as if it were a real life musical instrument (and from what I understand, she actually does NOT use sequencers when recording or playing her songs live and triggers all the samples manually, which makes her talent all the more amazing). In fact, if you didn't know that the bulk of the sounds on her records come from sampled bootlegs of live musicians and obscure "unsellable" CD's and LP's, you would think that Solex is an actual "band", with real musicians playing all the parts. What sets Solex apart from the typical breed of electronica yawnmeisters out there today is that Esselink actually can write a compelling SONG, complete with memorable, insidiously catchy melodies, shifting drum patterns and very unusual, yet highly compelling vocal stylings. The fact that the samples she uses are *really* cool (theres a LOT of neat samples of different jazz licks) just adds to her already-solid composition skills.
Admittedly, her lyrics are ridiculous. But that's part of the appeal of Solex.
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Format: Audio CD
I am not really a fan of contemporary "electronic" music, but ever since I picked up (no pun intended) this CD on a whim a few weeks ago, it has not left my CD player. Solex is the most refreshing and original "band" that I have ever had the pleasure to hear, and having discovered them purely by accident just makes this CD all the more special.
Solex is definitely not just another pretentious "electronica" outfit putting out boring, repetitive techno beats with pseudo-hip samples bleeping and blooping all over the place. In fact, this barely sounds like an "electronic" album at all. Elisabeth Esselink has an amazing talent for "playing" her samples as if it were a real life musical instrument (and from what I understand, she actually does NOT use sequencers when recording or playing her songs live and triggers all the samples manually, which makes her talent all the more amazing). In fact, if you didn't know that the bulk of the sounds on her records come from sampled bootlegs of live musicians and obscure "unsellable" CD's and LP's, you would think that Solex is an actual "band", with real musicians playing all the parts. What sets Solex apart from the typical breed of electronica yawnmeisters out there today is that Esselink actually can write a compelling SONG, complete with memorable, insidiously catchy melodies, shifting drum patterns and very unusual, yet highly compelling vocal stylings. The fact that the samples she uses are *really* cool (theres a LOT of neat samples of different jazz licks) just adds to her already-solid composition skills.
Admittedly, her lyrics are ridiculous. But that's part of the appeal of Solex.
Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
The art of sample-collision has, over the course of the past two decades, moved from the remote, exclusive province of musique concrete inheritors like John Oswald and Christian Marclay, to the more populist terrain of hip-hop and the diaspora electronica of ambient, techno, and turntablism. The widespread availability of samplers and sound-manipulation tools has been largely responsible for this shift, analog "cut-and-paste" having been replaced by digital "sample-and-hold." In the field of popular music, the cross-application of these styles is still relatively infrequent, limited mostly to records like Who's Afraid [Art of Noise 1984], Escape from Noise [Negativland 1983], and Music With Sound [Tape-Beatles 1991] -- seminal works where chunks of audio verite collapsed, exploded, and superimposed themselves in ways that were anything but seamless. But the crowning achievements of this era are behind us, and their crucial tricks -- the almost accidental innovation, their sense of logic-defying discovery -- have been lost in a post-electronica sea of smirking breakbeat-jockeying.
Enter Elisabeth Esselink, aka Solex, with a debut album (Solex Vs The Hitmeister), recorded secretively in the back room of her Amsterdam record shop, that exuded a willful ignorance of the emergent principles of sample-based music: If anything, it sounded like Christian Marclay pulverizing a stack of Liliput, Delta 5, and Slits records and gluing them together willy-nilly. What's more, she actually sang -- neither the two-word happy-house sloganeering of club music, nor the abstract angst of alternative/industrial, but hilarious, subtle dissections of human discomfort. It was a beautiful thing.
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