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The Pinball Effect: How Renaissance Water Gardens Made Carburetor Possible - and Other Journeys Paperback – Aug 1 1997

3.9 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Back Bay Books; Reprint edition (Aug. 1 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316116106
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316116107
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.9 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 454 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #527,760 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

From Amazon

Follow the bouncing ball, James Burke-style: spice trading in the Middle Ages leads to the European tea-drinking craze, which helps instigate the development of the science of natural history, which in turns inspires the creation of the coal miner's safety lamp, which is somehow related to the battle between the Monitor and the Merrimack. From there we go to North Carolina cotton industry, Thomas Edison's very first electric power station, air conditioning, glass manufacturing, and laser beams. The end result? The smart bombs used during the Gulf War. Burke, who wrote Connections (the book and the television show), revels--or better, wallows--in the accidental nature of the march of discovery. Despite a penchant for playing it loose and free with scientific and historical accuracy, Burke has compiled a fascinating look at the great matrix of change and transformation that humans have created for themselves. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Picking up the theme of his bestselling Connections and utilizing cross-chapter margin references that imitate computer hypertext, Burke investigates the dynamic interplay of scientific discovery, technological innovation and social change in a dizzying, mind-expanding adventure that explores the crosscurrents of history. One chapter follows a trail from slavery in America to English Quaker abolitionist Sampson Lloyd's nail-making business to German-American immigrant engineer John Roebling's wire suspension bridges (including the Brooklyn Bridge) to rustproofing with cadmium to nuclear reactors. Accident, luck, greed, ambition and mistakes abound as Scientific American columnist Burke tries to demonstrate the interconnectedness of all things. Another typical chapter unravels the serendipitous interactions among Cyrus Dalkin's invention of carbon paper, Edison's telephone (which used sooty carbon black in the transmitter), the rise of suburbs, X-ray crystallography and DNA. Often as maddening as a pinball game, this nevertheless unique and exciting odyssey may change the way you look at the world. Photos.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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on December 7, 2002
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